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Jean Pain Method  RSS feed

 
steward
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Here is a video of a Jean Pain system working in the winter in Vermont.

http://vimeo.com/57148852

Sorry, no embedded video.
 
pollinator
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We have a 200 yard pile with a few thousand ft of tubing going through it. Water goes in at 40f out at 140f. Were not doing the methane digester yet.
 
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From reading over Jean Pain's website, they sell multiple chipper shredders that chip the thin limbs (1/8 inch or smaller in diameter) into fine chips.
Are there any chipper shredders here in the States that have similar functionality as his low end models?
I have two big old brush piles of dead pecan/peach limbs. Was thinking of sorting through and chipping some of the small branches if practical for the purpose of surface composting for my orchard. Wonder if it makes a difference that the small limbs have been dead for awhile or if small green branches just cut are the key ingredient here. Don't have a chipper currently so is reason I was asking, and wanting to start with one up to the task.
 
pollinator
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Cal Burns wrote:From reading over Jean Pain's website, they sell multiple chipper shredders that chip the thin limbs (1/8 inch or smaller in diameter) into fine chips.
Are there any chipper shredders here in the States that have similar functionality as his low end models?



Check out Patriot chippers.
 
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We're putting up a yurt with limited access to utilities. We have access to plenty of wood chips. Lots of wood shavings too from a local mill. Wood shaveings are free and easy to haul. They bag them up and fork lift them right into the truck bed. Great! All I have to do is return the big bag.

Manure is another issue. Humanure, yes. Animal manure more difficult. Alot of people in our area are suffering from using manure in their gardens that is laced with broadleaf herbicides from the hay fed to animals. So i'm skeptical of most places where i can get a load of manure- easy access to lots of manure=barn=animals eating lots of hay. So, i'm wondering about the nitrogen source for a compost hot enough to heat water through a cold Colorado winter. Of course, the pile will need to be big big so that the center is nice and hot even if the outside is cold. Thoughts on this? We have access to coffee grounds, green grass/plentiful weeds... other ideas? What ratios produce the hottest compost?


Thanks!
 
gardener
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Urine is always a nice easy source of nitrogen, but it depends on how many urinating humans you have, and how much wood chips you're trying to compost. I haven't found any exact ratios, but common sense would let you say whether the number of contributors you have would make any serious impact on the amount of wood chips you've got.
 
graciela ellis
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Urine could definitely be an element, not enough supply fro our small family for the size of the compost pile we will need though.
 
Adrien Lapointe
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I just watched this video where they interview Jean Pain's nephew. I thought it was pretty interesting when they talked about producing methane from the pile after it is done producing heat.
 
pollinator
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Was reading this thread to try to ensure we aren't producing methane from out compost pile. (Methane is 20x worse than CO2 for creating greenhouse effect, according to Dancing Rabbit's webinar, which I recommend by the way, it's pretty good info and they're a great cause--dancingrabbit.org I think)

Can anyone say how can you _make sure you burn up all the methane_ from a (poorly maintained, overly nitrogenogenous) pile? My housemate is an avid dumpster diver and gets so much stuff and we don't have enough carbon to keep up. We may be able to get hold of some sawdust, but haven't yet. Are there other ways? if I go out there with a candle will I burn my eyebrows off? if i put a bucket over it will I be making art?
 
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