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Share what you know about honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos)

 
gardener & author
Posts: 620
Location: South Alabama
99
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"I think the easiest way to eat them is processed thru livestock."

Are you talking about eating the livestock... or picking the seeds out of manure piles?

KIDDING
 
Posts: 288
Location: Deepwater northern New South wales Australia
1
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R Scott wrote:We have some that drop caltrops (4-6 thorns shaped like a jack, no matter which way it lands there is a thorn sticking UP). They will go through 12 ply tractor tires, and any boot other than vietnam era punji boots. Those trees have to die, I will resort to chemicals if I have to. But I am learning to appreciate them in other areas. If I could keep them thornless I would have a lot more of them.


why not remove the thorns and use them for somthing productive;;;;(treating bowel cancer!!!)
 
                              
Posts: 9
Location: SW Mo working in Kabul Afg
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Spent a lot of money on tractor tire repairs, even had a Dr visit to deal with an infection from a thorn in my shoulder.
But with that said, They are a beautiful wood when milled but do have a tendency to split and crack with worked.
I am working some right now to make my posts for my barn. Oh and to deal with the tires, I had them all foam filled
 
andrew curr
Posts: 288
Location: Deepwater northern New South wales Australia
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Does anyone know anything about using gleditsia sinensis for anthelmentic /vermifuge???.
would it be possible to use Tricanthus???
I ve heard that the bark is used
 
pollinator
Posts: 137
Location: Eastern Ontario
38
cattle trees tiny house composting toilet wood heat greening the desert
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Has anyone ever coppiced Honey Locust?  Black Locust will coppice like nothing I have ever seen. I wonder if Honey's do?
 
gardener
Posts: 3441
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
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forest garden trees woodworking
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Not puposefully, but in clearing brush with loppers I’ve often topped small trees, intending to return with a larger tool. Young trees, anyway, thrive under this treatment.  I have a truce with the older trees on my property; we wage war in the airspace below nine feet in altitude so that I can walk without being shredded, and they can live unmolested in the volume above that.  The initial battles (where I fight those long spiked horizontal limbs back to the trunks) are never bloodless!

If you live with these trees, titanium insoles are a great thing to have.
 
pollinator
Posts: 561
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Personally.I like the bean.

cover them in water, bring to boil, pour off tannin water.
again, cover the beans with water, bring to a boil, pour.water off.

dry the beans and store.

this process makes a very mild bean which I've used in chili
The bean is so mild, I've used it as a cereal too with honey.

Lastly, I made a coffee by roasting the bean
 
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