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Bacteria, Fungi and Nematodes Oh My!  RSS feed

 
gardener
Posts: 5719
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
810
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
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hau Natasha, as you have discovered, when we use the anaerobic concoctions they become aerated simply by the act of pouring them through air to the soil, and that soil also contains air so what was anaerobic becomes aerobic.
Earth worms make tunnels in the soil and that also allows more air to get down to where they are doing their jobs, if you have worms you have aerated soil.

I love your compost heap method, it works extremely well.
I use straw bales much the same way, adding spent coffee grounds to increase nitrogen three to four weeks prior to planting which gets the interior of the bales composting.

Redhawk
 
Posts: 71
Location: Cape Town
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Thank you, Dr Redhawk, for your explanation! It makes perfect sense now. Also for your tip about the coffee grounds, I will try that next time.
By the way, building compost heaps is my favourite occupation. Could do it all day if I weren't called away by pesky distractions like the need to make a living :)
 
Posts: 86
Location: Spain
forest garden fungi urban
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Can anyone, suggest mycorrhizas inoculum brands that sell reliable products. There are so many around.
I am looking for a product that can be useful for inoculating fruit trees like olives and almonds and also some N-fixers shrubs
I understand that I mainly need endo-mycorrhizas but most products come as a mix of endo and ecto mycorrhizal fungi, which means that I will have less of what I really need even though the other types might play other roles in the terrain around.
Also what is the minimum count of propagules that need to be in the product?

Some of the products also come as a powder that becomes like a gel when mixed with water, which seems to be good for bare root plants, still I am not sure what amount of product of this type I may need to buy for X amount of trees, since they say you need to coat the tree roots with the gel-like substance, still some of the brands sell like 1 liter bottles and don't know how many bottles I may need especially if I have to submerge the root system into this gel-like fluid..and I'd also need to have a big enough container for the tree roots to be dipped into the stuff....

Do you think that I may need both the gel type of inoculum for the bare root plants AND the pellet type for container raised plants, or the pellet type can be used in both cases?

Cheers
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 5719
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
810
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
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hau Antonio, I personally only purchase mycorrhizae from Mushroom people like Fungi Perfecti (Paul Stamets company), there are several out there to choose from, all will provide a nice mix of ecto and endo species that are fresh.

I prefer the dry types, powder or pelletized, they are most likely to last you the longest time in storage conditions. These are spores not growing fungi so I can wait for up to five years to use them up.
When I plant with mycorrhizae, I just sprinkle some of the powder onto the roots I've exposed for the purpose (one or two pinches is plenty), then I put the soil back in the hole and water the plant in well.

Once again I want to stress that the most reputable mushroom folks are the place to buy from.
I've seen a lot of junk offered on the internet from non mushroom people.

Redhawk
 
Antonio Scotti
Posts: 86
Location: Spain
forest garden fungi urban
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Thanks for your feedback Bryant.
Would you be able to share names of other brands that you consider reputable, and what I need to look into the product to be able to tell if I may want to buy it or not (I mainly need arbuscular m. many brands sell a mix of arbuscular and ectomycorrhizas + bacterias and humic acids or even vitamins)? I have read that powderized mycorrhizas of endomcorrhizas usuallly doesn't work well because the process of creating the dust (grinding?) destroys the spores which are quite "big". On the other hand I have seen some brands that sell micronized  products but don't know exactly what that means and if they are usually a different process than grinding.

Regards
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 5719
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
810
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
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Mycoapply

Kelp4Less

SoilNoc

EcoVam

I have used granular types only, not micronized (a form that seems to be a gimmick to me)
Currently I have some plants in containers that I am growing my own mycorrhizae in so I can use already active spawn.
When I pull some soil for use as inoculant I simply replace the soil in the container with fresh soil, do try to disturb the root systems as little as possible. (I use a 3/4" pvc pipe piece to pull plugs from the containers, I only pull 3-4 from each container, about once per two month period)

Nearly all plants on earth rely on mycorrhizal fungi for nutrients and moisture.
Many plants are extremely dependent and can struggle to survive without the beneficial fungi (grapes and roses are examples).
Most plants use the “Endo” types of fungi that physically enter into roots.  
Pines, Oaks and a few others use “Ecto” types that form a sheath around the roots.

Redhawk
 
Antonio Scotti
Posts: 86
Location: Spain
forest garden fungi urban
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Thanks Bryant
In case you have a bare root tree to plant, how do you use these granular types in order for the spores to make good contact with the tree roots?
Do you just dilute them in water and wet the roots?...I was just thinking (right now) to do a gel like solution with agar-agar and water and mix the mico-powder/granules with this gel so that it could stick to the bare roots...
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 5719
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
810
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I like to wet the roots of the bare root tree and sprinkle the granules on after I've set the tree with the roots spread out. The mycorrhizae go on then I start to fill the dirt back into place, water in at half way full (the planting hole) then fill the rest of the way and water in a second time.
I do it this way because it allows me to have more control and less waste of my mycorrhizae.
I always use an ecto/endo blend of mycorrhizae mostly because I don't want to bother with having to keep track of three quantities and it also gives the opportunity for full symbiosis to occur faster, which is very beneficial to the tree and surrounding plants.

Redhawk
 
Antonio Scotti
Posts: 86
Location: Spain
forest garden fungi urban
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In some of the products that I see around, some have a variety of endo mycorrhizas (4 to 7), some only put one (usually glomus intraradices).

I am just wondering how probable it is that all these other varieties can be found in all continents.
For example I doubt that Paraglomus brasilianum will be found in European soils....(just by the name), but I am quite ignorant about all the others (G. mosseae, G. aggregatum, G. etunicatum, etc.) I ask this because if I'd know that certain varieties don't happen to live in european soils than I could avoid alltogether buying a product that has them, because this will have less propagules of the ones that will most probably work. I know this is usually done so that the mix is general enough so that one or the other will surely work, but there will be less propagules of each...

On the other hand are these others (other than G. intraradices) also be able to adapt to different type of conditions, so that if they are unleashed in a foreign environment than their original one, can do their job as well so it may make sense to have them after all)?

Does anyone know of any good source of info on this?
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Posts: 5719
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
810
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
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On every continent you can locate most every species of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF), there are some locations (ie peat bogs) where these organisms will not be found because of a too high acidity, but usually right next door will be soil that contains many of the AMF species.
Paraglomus brasilianum is not just found in the amazon basin and other parts of South America, it is found from the southern tip of Argentina all the way to the start of the northern polar cap.
While it is true that no one particular species will be found all over in the same or even similar quantities, there will be a few examples of it found in root zone samples.
Nature creates wide diversity for the purpose of maintaining the life cycle and that means that some species of AMF and / or endomycorrhizae will be present in every sample of roots taken in thriving ecosystem soil samples.

Commercial products should contain as broad a cross section of Mycorrhizae as possible so that within that packet, there will be species that thrive and do their job well.
Once a mycorrhizae gains the first foot hold, it will reproduce rapidly (very similar to how fast bacteria will multiply in perfect conditions) and spread to all the roots in its surrounding soil, this will continue for as long as there are non containing roots and that includes the roots of nearby plants.
In the matter of one year one healthy mycorrhizae spore can populate an area of one acre as long as there are fresh roots to infiltrate or coat, depending on if the fungi is endodermic or exodermic, and if both types are present, all the better because the roots will then have the complete mycorrhizal complement.

All the published papers I've found on this phenomenon are pay to read at the microbiology journal sites.
 
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