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Who else wants to keep listening to Pauls podcasts?

 
master steward
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all podcasts/videos are on hold. I have been bonkers about getting links to my cast iron article. I suppose until I have "enough", there will be no podcasts/videos.  This is a job that has been put off too long.

Is there a place here where you talk about your own history



A bio page: http://www.richsoil.com/paul-wheaton.jsp

Why not write a quick summary of your Gaia's Garden podcasts so far and include a link to the podcast as well?



I think that's a great idea.  How about if you do that?  Then you can have the money AND help build my empire!  Yes!

i was going to write adam carolla an email and i tried but i couldnt find anyway to email him or a contact phone number.



Thanks for trying.  It does seem that stuff like that is what helps build the empire. 

i did try to put a link up at the yahoo! groups forum for the csa that i used to manage



Excellent!  All of those links add up.  Thanks!

For the last few days, and probably for a while in the future, I'm bonkers about links for the cast iron article.  If you find places to mention that, that would help to resolve my current obsession.

maybe it would be helpful for you to listen to more podcasts yourself



Maybe.  But it's a bit like telling somebody that doesn't like brussel sprouts "maybe it would be helpful for you to eat more brussel sprouts yourself."

SLOW DOWN



Well, I've stopped.  It doesn't get much slower than that.  If I never feed this thing I have about cast iron links, then I won't make another podcast.

Control the length of each episode - One hour is about right. Less if appropriate.



I have some people saying the opposite.  And I have some people saying 15 to 20 minutes.  And some people saying two to three hours.  I think I'm gonna stick to however long it ends up being.

Be a guest on other podcasts - obviously you know this after being on spearco's survival podcast. I will recommend you as a guest to some other podcasters, and I would encourage any others on this forum to do the same.



I think that sounds smart.  This might be worthy of a whole new thread here in the tinkering forum.

Have you thought about putting up a paypal donte button, or something like it? I know I would donate...



I have a similar idea.  But mostly because I had the super awesome idea a few years ago and then found somebody that implemented it and I really want to support them.  More news on that when I've implemented it on my end.

Think about your audience and the use of the F-bomb.



If I heard that my Aunt Donna Lee listened to my podcasts, the F-bomb would be gone.  Until then, I enjoy using the full beauty of the english language.






 
pollinator
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I keep listening to Paul's podcasts and spreading the word because quite frankly when I listen to how Paul thinks about things, I'm opened to a fresh perspective. 

Lots of "AHA!!" moments for me listening to Paul think about stuff.

Paul, I think you not being a podcast consumer actually makes your podcast extremely special.  Other podcasts are highly commercialized, lots of whoring of sponsors, podcasters who are pseudo-experts that are actually talking out of their buttholes, or just plain boring.



 
paul wheaton
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I'm thinking of whoring sponsors.

I've spent a lot of time over the last couple of weeks doing a lot of dirty work.  I suppose if I had sponsors, then I could take the money and give it to somebody that is more of an expert at this dirty work.  Of course that's a whole nuther bottle of shit I don't want to get into.

I'm feeling 008.


 
pollinator
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I notice that, as of tonight, all links on permies, richsoil, and in the daily-ish emails to the podcast page or to any individual podcast appear to be broken.  Instead, they all direct you to the article on Diatomacious Earth.  Excellent article, by the way.

Surely this must be a glitch.  I see in this forum that Paul is just recently committed to taking a break from making new podcasts (oh no, I love your 'casts!), but surely this is no reason to intentionally cut off access to the archive of older podcasts...?

BTW, I am a noob to permaculture and struggling against a number of difficulties and handicaps to build a sub-urban homestead for myself, by myself.  I've read a couple of good books, but I feel like half of my knowledge and guidance on the subject - including tips on what books to buy next! - have come from listening to your podcasts.  So please, don't take too long a break from them : )  I need to become much more active in the forums as well - this is my 1st post, ever, and I've only explored just a few of the past threads - but I am way too short on time right now.  The podcasts are much easier for me to work in to my schedule.

Thanks,

~ Matthew N., southern transplant
 
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Wow Paul,

I LOVE YOUR STUFF.  I'd say that your content has almost single-handedly catapulted my understanding of Permaculture.  I started with watching some stuff on Bill Mollison and Fukuoka.  I read some books, but your stuff was über-motivating!

I've been speaking to groups of people in my area about these things and pointing them to Permies.com (I didn't even realize that richsoil.com existed until recently).  My groups are about 60-80 people and my mailing list is in the hundreds.

I don't have a site going yet, but we've been installing keyhole gardens at members' homes, drawing names and going to that house next.  We've installed over 10,000 sq ft of keyhole garden space in the last 6 months.

I'm reading Gaia's Garden ONLY BECAUSE OF YOUR PODCASTS and I LOVE IT!  I've been taking notes from your podcast directly into the book.  They are much appreciated. 

I'm only out here today because I finished chapter 6 and wanted to hear the podcast.  I can't find it.  The page keeps going back to the diatomatious earth article (I love that one too). 

All I can say is, I've become a permie-nut thanks to you and your videos.  I already see some of the older ones and get nostalgic. 

Permies.com and Paul Wheaton have literally changed my life!  I mean, Hügelkutur alone has revolutionized my food production.  I pretty much base everything I hear and read on a wheaton-scale.

Do, hang in there.  Over the summer, I almost always crash and burn.  It's the heat, slight dehydration, I don't know...  When fall rolls around, I'm renewed!

I loved your Spirko appearances, but I found you on YouTube way before that. 

So, I'm officially going to work on getting your skillet article linked as many ways as I can.  I'm a web developer and I'll get my programmers to load up the web with these links!  I hope you'll have to hang on to your hat in the next few days!

Your SHIT ROCKS!
 
paul wheaton
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testing ....

it looks like all links are working as expected except for links to the blogs/podcasts

could folks please verify this for me? 

Here is a link to the lawn care article.  Does it take you to the lawn care page?

 
paul wheaton
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So, I'm officially going to work on getting your skillet article linked as many ways as I can.  I'm a web developer and I'll get my programmers to load up the web with these links!



Very excellent news!  thanks! 
 
Matthew Nistico
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Roger that: your link did take me to the lawn care article.
 
Matthew Nistico
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...and ditto Sunshine's sentiments, for sure.  Your shit DOES rock!

Thanks for all you contribute to the wider world.
 
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Matthew - good for you. I keep telling people that we should reclaim the suburbs, since they once were farmland. I am in a small town and I envy the big lots in the suburbs. I have no lawn !!!  I added new beds each year until it was gone. It's a mixture of flowers, herbs, fruits and veggies, with the raggedy-looking stuff in the back. But our town is pretty funky (Fayetteville, AR) and we even have cows in town. IMO Mama Earth suffers as much from snooty people as evil people - forbidding clothes lines and such. Ridiculous.

I used to live in the boonies and had deer, snakes, chiggers, ticks, stray cows, crows. I have none of that in town. Just cats and armadillos. Everything has a trade off.

Paul - the links work for me.
 
Matthew Nistico
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@RitaSparrow - Thanks.  And wow, yours is a pretty funky town, indeed.  Cows are fine, but clothes lines are not allowed?  LOL!  If I were given a tiny urban lot like yours, I'd probably do the same: reduce my entire lawn to a walking path between garden beds.  Sounds like your previous residence in the boonies would have provided many more horticultural opportunities.

I guess calling myself "suburban" is appropriate.  I actually live within city limits, but my "city" is a small college town in a rural setting.  If you saw my property, you'd probably say "country road."  Yet I wouldn't call myself "rural," either, since my lot is only just under 1 acre and I definitely have to take impact-on-my-neighbors into account in all of my plans.  I would guess the total area I am bringing into cultivation (i.e. that does not have a house or driveway or fringe of woods on it) is a little under half an acre.  So, that sounds pretty typical of the burbs, right?  I sure don't think of it as a big lot worthy of envy.

At least I am highly secluded: my neighbors are close on two sides, but there is little of my land that is in direct line of sight from just about anywhere.

~ Matthew N., southern transplant

P.S. You have armadillos in Arkansas?  I had no idea.

P.P.S Thanks for fixing the links, Paul!
 
Rita Vail
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Matthew - sorry I was not clearer. I was referring to those towns /cities that outlaw clothes lines and front yard gardens. Luckily, mine may have too little regulation. Actually, it's fine. Arkansas was once famous for rural dumping and yards full of old cars and appliances, but not so much now. I have barking dogs and loose cats, mostly, some drunken university late-night antics, and too many mercury-vapor street lights that make me long for the country.

I haven't yet solved the conflict of wanting to live remote (again), at least where I can see the stars, but I would then drive more. In town, I get by on one tank of gas a month. And I do understand that people want to live in the wilderness, but then it is no longer wilderness if people live there with utilities, roads, etc. And I do appreciate being able to garden without deer and chiggers. I wish I could just be content.

The main problem is that I have no room to plant fruit trees. I have two figs, a blueberry, some rasberries and strawberries, but not enough to do more than graze on them. I am thining about selling my place and living on someone else's farm and working for free for the privelge of living and eating there, maybe in a Tumbleweed tiny home on wheels.

Anyway - we grateful if you have room for fruit, can see the stars, and are not too constrained by neighbors - and have decent soil, good rainfall, and are not in a flood plain underneath a volcano. 
 
Matthew Nistico
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@RitaSparrow - Ahhh, the challenge of being content with what one has.  That vision of the greener grass has plagued mankind since the dawn of time, has it not?  Good luck with that ; )

RitaSparrow wrote:
I am thinking about selling my place and living on someone else's farm and working for free for the privelge of living and eating there, maybe in a Tumbleweed tiny home on wheels.



Hey, bring it on!  My "farm" is a little bit on the small side, and still in its embryonic stage for sure, but we can work something out.

And I had to look up Tumbleweeds.  I have a friend in Asheville, NC, purchased plans for just such a tiny home on wheels (maybe from Tumbleweed!) and is planning to start construction this coming week, as a matter of fact.  My hat goes off to anyone who can live successfully in such a space for the long haul, though I can see some of the appeal, too.  ...but this is probably a topic for a different thread in a different forum.

Best wishes to you, fighting off the stray dogs and drunken college kids.  Hope that someday you get your backyard orchard, one way or another.

~ Matthew N., southern transplant
 
Rita Vail
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Actually, to get back on-topic - I would love to hear some pod casts on how permies get along with the wild critters peaceably, and still get enough to eat - and also - the permie approach to shelter, for people, animals, and plants, especially if you are having to modify an existing home place. There are bits and pieces around dealing with insulation, wood stoves, cooling and food cellars, but it would be exciting to interview different folks focusing on how they solved  problems, and avoided problems through design.
 
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I have listened to all of the podcasts and most more than once.  I have now reevaluated how i look at my land and the areas I avoided, thinking there was no potential.  How dumb I've been.  The podcast, articles and this forum have been a great help.  Keep the podcasts coming.  Thanks!   
 
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