brand new video:
       
get all 177 hours of
presentations here.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Are Jerusalem Artichokes still viable if soft when planting?  RSS feed

 
Michael Longfield
Posts: 95
Location: Southern IL zone 7
6
books toxin-ectomy trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
After jerusalem artichokes sitting after harvest, they can quickly turn soft if not properly stored. If they do turn soft, are they still viable for planting?

Thanks
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 4026
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
172
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And I would like to add a question. What is the best way to store them, so they will not get soft or rot?
 
Craig Dobbson
master steward
Posts: 1921
Location: Maine (zone 5)
228
chicken dog food preservation forest garden goat hugelkultur rabbit trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I guess it depends on how wilted they are but I've found that they are pretty tough to kill. The best storage is in the ground attached to the plant. Every time I've tried to store them, they last a week at most and then they go soft and are best suited for pigs or replanting. It's best just to harvest what you plan on eating within the next day or so. Once the ground freezes, you're kinda locked out unless you mulch super heavy around the plants. I'd plant whatever you're not comfortable eating and don't be surprised if you have a forest of Sunchokes again next year.

I planted six tubers 4 years ago and now I have a hedge of them. The first year yielded about 10 gallons of tubers. I fed most of them to the animals and then replanted about a gallon of them after they went brown and wilty. Since then I've been able to pull about 5 gallons of tubers per 2 feet of hedge without decreasing the next years yield. As a matter of fact the "occupied space" expands annually. The hedge is about 3 feet wide and 30 feet long or so and growing. Animals eat the whole plant too so that's a plus. I'm not a fan of them actually but they make a nice wind break and nutrient trap.
 
Michael Longfield
Posts: 95
Location: Southern IL zone 7
6
books toxin-ectomy trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have heard that you can extend their life span by storing them in wet sand, or in slightly damp soil. Which makes sense, they naturally live in the soil all winter, so if you can replicate that environment, they will be eating quality much longer. I will be experimenting with that this winter. I have some in a soil/sand mixture. I have been told that they should last a few months with this method.
 
Michael Longfield
Posts: 95
Location: Southern IL zone 7
6
books toxin-ectomy trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for the response!!
 
Roger Taylor
Posts: 104
Location: New Zealand
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I bought a kg on the internet, they came wrapped in newspaper. I put them behind the door in the washhouse, out of the sun, where it would have been cool. I planted them several months later and they were not soft. I also had some yacon stored in the same place, which were in a plastic bag within the newspaper. The yacon were rotten, because of the plastic. Planted some of them out, and they still took.
 
We're all out of roofs. But we still have tiny ads:
Mike Oehler's Low-Cost Underground House Workshop & Survival Shelter Seminar - 3 DVD+2 Books Deal
https://permies.com/wiki/48625/digital-market/digital-market/Mike-Oehler-Cost-Underground-House
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!