• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Most productive perennial vegetables?  RSS feed

 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9696
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
176
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would like to add more perennial vegetables to my garden, but I don't want to waste space on low producers. So far for me the most productive are Garlic Chive, Walking Onion, Canada Onion, and Elephant Garlic. As you can see, alliums grow well for me, but I don't need more of those, really. The next most productive is Canna, but I think the tubers are yucky so we won't be eating it unless starving. I'd like some perennial carbohydrates. I have Sunchoke, but it has not been a great producer for me so far. Maybe I should try another variety? I think I have "Stampede" but I'm not certain.

Let me know what are your big producers. Thanks!
 
Cristo Balete
Posts: 428
Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
12
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think you could do this in zone 8. I have some chard plants that are 4 years old. They get clumpy, and thick at the woody base, but I trim the clumps so there's air space between them, cut off any stems that are shooting out and bolting, and keep feeding them, and they produce lots of big leaves. They can take some low temps, but probably not continuous freezing. I've got Fordhook and Ruby chard. I don't really like the rainbow chard. I think the heirloom ones have better flavor.

Look into Asian greens. I had one bitter green that bolted into a tall, amazing blue flower, yet it came back every year. I need to find the name of that again.

Malabar spinach is also called perpetual spinach, http://www.kitazawaseed.com/seeds_malabar_spinach.html

If you have a mild winter area and you keep cutting off the bolting stems as soon as you see them, you can keep a lot of greens going as if they were a perennial.

 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9696
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
176
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks! I was able to keep some Collard plants like that for a couple years. I will definitely try it with the greens I'm growing now. Most greens survive our warmish winters.

I have Malabar Spinach but I think it is a tropical plant, isn't it? Probably won't make it through the winter without special care.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
garden master
Posts: 2339
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
434
bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

In my garden, commercial sunroot varieties produce about 13 pounds of tubers per plant. That scenario is if they are dug every year so that they don't get overcrowded. I always miss a few tubers, so they regenerate themselves, and I weed them out so that plants are spaced about 18" apart.

 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9696
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
176
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's very encouraging, Joseph! I'm looking at "Supernova" variety of Sunchoke.
 
Cristo Balete
Posts: 428
Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tyler, it might be worth setting up a small greenhouse to overwinter greens. I have a path down the center of mine, and the beds on either side are layered compost piles that stay hot to keep the temps up. Greenhouses cut the windchill. All you have to do is keep them a couple degrees above freezing for greens, which is pretty easy in Zones 8 and 9.

A PVC hoop house is not expensive. It uses 20 foot rebar hoops that 1/2" PVC is then slid over the rebar, and the rebar is put into the ground at 12 feet apart, hoops every 3 or 4 feet. A couple pieces of rebar going horizontally on either side at 3 feet up from the ground, another 2 feet up from that, and one running the length of the top, wired together, all covered with 1/2 PVC because the rebar cuts through plastic, is cheap and quick and can be added to if you want. I have made mine 7 feet in the center so I can go in easily with a hat on. The door is wide enough to accommodate a wheelbarrow.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9696
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
176
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for that suggestion, Cristo.

 
Joylynn Hardesty
Posts: 199
Location: Officially Zone 7a, nearer 6b, SW Tennessee
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The zone map says that I am in 7a. I think I am becoming 6b. At any rate, I can keep turnips, mustard, and kale alive all winter in my garden. Sometimes there are perhaps 4 weeks that they look REALLY sad, but they recover when it warms up into the daytime 40s. Chard will perish in the garden. But uphill in front of the east facing house, I too have had 4 year old chard. So zone 8 ought to easily do this. It seems micro-climates abound.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6150
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
193
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 876
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
yacon is ridiculously productive.
 
Dave Dahlsrud
Posts: 498
Location: North-Central Idaho, 4100 ft elev., 24 in precip
26
books food preservation fungi hugelkultur trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It seems like tree collards might be a good choice: http://www.bountifulgardens.org/Tree-Collards/products/141/
They should do pretty good in your climate. Also I've had potatoes come back for me for three years in some of hugel mounds and I'm in zone 6, so I bet you could perennialize spuds there. Just don't dig them all up, kinda like you would do with the sunchokes.
 
chip sanft
Posts: 380
Location: 18 acres & heart in zone 4 (central MN). Current abode: Knoxville (zone 6 /7)
26
bike books dog
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sweet potatoes produce edible greens as well as the tubers and they grow like mad when they like a place. The winter here is too cold for them but some kinds are supposed to be hardy in zone 8. And they're cheap, so experimenting wouldn't cost you a lot.

And while not a vegetable (but then neither is a tomato), figs seem possible, and you can do a lot of veggie-like things with them, before and after they're rip. Our fig tree just finished its second season without producing (Luke 13:6-9) but people nearby generally get great results without much effort, provided they beat the birds.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9696
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
176
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These are some great suggestions, thanks! I've had moderate luck with Sweet Potatoes, and I think with a little more effort I could do better. They also seem to perennialize pretty well; again with a little more effort they'd probably do that better too.

With Sweet Potatoes and Sunchokes I'd be getting a good amount of calories growing. I tried once with Yacon and it died, but I think the soil might not have suited (heavy clay) or it might get too hot here.

 
Cristo Balete
Posts: 428
Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I forgot about a great one, asparagus. The crowns are available when all the other bareroot plants show up. The easiest I've grown is Mary Washington and Jersey Giant. I start the crowns in a gallon pot to make sure they get a good rootball on them, then plant them out. It helps to put them where you walk often because they will completely disappear in the winter, then when they start coming up it's time to cut them in the late spring. They will keep shooting spears for about a month, and they must be cut at about 8-10 inches so they won't turn into ferns. Then let the last few spears grow into ferns so it can feed the crown for next year's growth. The ferns get quite tall, sometimes 5 feet.

once established they are quite drought tolerant. When I first started my garden here 20 years ago I put asparagus in a place that didn't turn out to be a garden, and they are still coming up 20 years later, even though they don't get much water except winter and spring rain. They are much more productive, of course, with manure and mulch in late fall and early spring. Make sure there's no raw manure on them 6 weeks before you expect them to sprout. Basil, parsley and tomatoes are good companion plants for asparagus, but mark where they are so you don't hit them with a shovel when working around tomato plants, keep them a couple feet apart.

After cutting the spear, bend and snap the bottom part of the spear to find where the tough part ends and the tender part starts.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9696
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
176
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cristo Balete wrote: I had one bitter green that bolted into a tall, amazing blue flower, yet it came back every year. I need to find the name of that again.


Was it Chicory?



I have some Asparagus plants in an area which is no longer a garden and they keep growing without care. But the deer get them because I haven't put a special little fence around them!
 
Cristo Balete
Posts: 428
Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tyler, that is the style of flower, all right. Mine was really dark blue. Must have been a relative of chicory. And it came up just like that, too, abandoned and where it's dry, made it through two years of no water from me, and not much from Ma Nature. Thanks for the pic.

The weeds grow up around my original asparagus patch and the deer don't find it until late summer, and they only eat the tops, it hasn't seemed to slow the plants down. Neither do the weeds coming up around them, they do just fine. It's just the I forget to go out there in time to cut them, they are out of the sphere of effort when things get busy in the spring.
 
dirk maes
Posts: 69
Location: belgium
4
fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Runner beans, perennial and a bit cold tolerant, mulching helps. Gives a good yield.
Sweet cicely. More a herb then a vegetable but the whole plant is edible. Leaves, green seeds and the root cooked.
Lovage . A good celery substitute.
Rumex patientia. Patience dock, "garden patience", "herb patience", or "monk's rhubarb". Early spring/ late winter it gives a good harvest of large, slightly sour leaves.
 
dirk maes
Posts: 69
Location: belgium
4
fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Look here :
thevegetablegarden.be
 
Rose Pinder
Posts: 410
Location: Otago, New Zealand
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
how about globe artichokes?
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9696
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
176
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've grown Globe Artichokes but they are not especially productive and it turns out we don't really like them! Still, it was fun to grow them for a couple years. Now I'm growing Cardoon but have not eaten it yet.

 
luke allen
Posts: 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Check Bountiful Gardens Tree Collards
Grown in Willits, Ca.

 
Casie Becker
garden master
Posts: 1401
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
103
forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It won't help with you not liking artichokes, but I cooked the flower stalk as well as the actual artichoke and it came out just as tender as the artichoke heart, but there was a lot more of it. Seems like by eating only the flower head our artichoke industry is ignoring 75% or more of the good eating on that plant.
 
Roberto pokachinni
pollinator
Posts: 1214
Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
77
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi hugelkultur solar trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Seems like by eating only the flower head our artichoke industry is ignoring 75% or more of the good eating on that plant

The leaves of the globe artichoke are also edible.

You could put them in a strong flavored dish like an Indian curry, or a spicy Thai or Mexican dish, or mixed mashed in a savory spiced Mediterranean stew, heavy on your alliums so that you are not repulsed by the taste!
 
Bryor Newton
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Would it be possible to grow Green Globe Artichoke in Indiana, well i know it would be possible but would there be enough harvest and a good taste to make it worth it?


Feel free to use this coupon for you're help and if you need seeds. = ]

Use Coupon Code "Permies" for a 20% discount
Green Globe Artichoke: RaiseSeeds



RaiseSeeds.com




 
Benton Lewis
Posts: 109
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I have some Asparagus plants in an area which is no longer a garden and they keep growing without care. But the deer get them because I haven't put a special little fence around them!

Thought of using fishing line to scare deer away? Apparently, its too thin for them to see and scares them away when they bump into something invisible
 
Cristo Balete
Posts: 428
Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These are not technically perennials, but where the ground doesn't freeze, garlic and potatoes keep coming back. I planted some garlic 20 years ago, and I've never had to plant it again, there are always the little "seeds" of garlic and potatoes left behind. The tiny garlic "seed" takes two years to mature, but once you get three years into tending a patch of them, they will keep coming. there's also top-setting garlic that puts the seeds up in a sort of flower clove at the top of a stem if left in the ground. Knocking off and covering those little seeds will start them up again the next spring.
 
Mike Cantrell
Posts: 552
Location: Mid-Michigan
28
bee books duck food preservation forest garden hunting solar trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How about stinging nettles (the vegetable that will bite you first!) ?

They're a weed here.

Super nutritious, very tasty, and I find them hearty or satisfying or something, in a way that other greens aren't.
 
PI day is 3.14 (march 14th) and is also einstein's birthday. And this is merely a tiny ad:
2017 Homesteaders PDC (permaculture design course) & ATC (appropriate technology course) in Montana
https://permies.com/wiki/61764/Homesteaders-PDC-permaculture-design-ATC
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!