• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Mycorrhizal varieties for Bur Oak??

 
klorinth McCoy
Posts: 101
Location: Southern Manitoba, Canada, Zone 3B
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can anyone help me with some ideas of what I should look for when inoculating Bur Oak acorns?

I would like to start planting acorns that have been collected locally. But I would also like to inoculate with a couple different fungi that are edible. I like to make sure that everything I put into my property has more then one purpose. It would be great to collect mushrooms that I could use for cooking.

What varieties are a good match for Bur Oak in zone 3B?
 
John Saltveit
gardener
Posts: 1999
61
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't know specifically for zone 3 but many of the boletes are mycorrhizal and could work with that. I would check with a local or equivalent mushroom organization in zone 3 if you do'nt get a good answer here.
John S
PDX OR
 
klorinth McCoy
Posts: 101
Location: Southern Manitoba, Canada, Zone 3B
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So the King Bolete grows around here apparently. Looks like that is a good candidate. I just need to find a source of spores or mycelium I guess.
 
klorinth McCoy
Posts: 101
Location: Southern Manitoba, Canada, Zone 3B
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I found a list of species that grow in the province. Only problem is that the names are the common colloquial names. Good place to start though.

So here is the list:

apricot jelly mushroom
bear's head tooth mushroom
beefsteak fungus
black morel
chicken of the woods
comb tooth mushroom
common puffball
fairy ring mushroom
golden chanterelle (aka chanterelle)
hedgehog mushroom

hexagonal-pored polypore
horse mushroom
indigo milk cap
ink cap
jelly ear (aka wood ear)
king bolete (aka cepe)
lobster mushroom
meadow mushroom
mica cap
oyster mushroom
[i]shaggy mane

yellow swamp russula
yellow-gilled russula[/i]

I would really appreciate opinions of what people prefer on this list. I'm already a big fan of Chanterelles, so those would be great to grow. And the King Bolete appears to be a given. I only have experience with thee or four of these though so I need input from others with lots more experience.
 
Fred Tyler
garden master
Posts: 355
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
241
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Several years ago I was helping a researcher at the University of Minnesota collect mycorrhizal fungi that grew in association with bur oak. He was tracking species distribution and density. He said there were over 200 species that associated with bur oak. He didn't say how many of those were edible, but with that many, there's bound to be a few good choices. Maybe i can try and track him down.

Klorinth: most of the mushrooms on that provincial list are saprophytic, so would not be good choices unless you were inoculating logs and not acorns.
 
klorinth McCoy
Posts: 101
Location: Southern Manitoba, Canada, Zone 3B
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you Fred. So I guess that might mean that almost any of the mycorrhizal fungi that I find locally will be good for the oaks.

I will try to find time to harvest some mushrooms from the stands near here. That way I can be sure of the right stuff. I was just hoping to get an edible one. I may not find any King Bolete. At least it isn't a for sure thing.
 
We find this kind of rampant individuality very disturbing. But not this tiny ad:
2017 Permaculture Design Course and Appropriate Technology Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!