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Coywolf -the new predator on the block

 
gardener
Posts: 842
Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/coywolf-meet-the-coywolf/8605/
Met the Coywolf

they are everywhere
the hunters think they are a "government plot" to thin the deer herd
I think they are Nature's plot to thin the deer herd
and to reduce the groundhog population

I haven't see any but have seen tracks and heard them at night

anybody else want to share experiences with them?
 
Posts: 20
Location: New-Brunswick, Canada
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Without looking too deep into it, those look like the coyotes we've had here in New-Brunswick for decades. They do kill a lot of deer in winter, and even some moose. They breed like rabbits, and when the population reaches the carrying capacity of the habitat, they all either die of starvation, mange, or distemper. Its pretty gruesome. We are at the low spot in the cycle now, very few fox or coyotes around. But they always bounce right back.
 
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This has popping up for years, while coyotes and dogs can and have bred the offspring is sterile just like a mule. I'd have to research it but there's a reason animals grow bigger in northern climates, it's called ? Law, they grow more body mass to withstand the colder weather,it's the reason them northern boys say our Texas whitetails ain't much bigger than their rabbits.
 
martin doucet
Posts: 20
Location: New-Brunswick, Canada
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Yes, I know what you mean Tracy, about some animals growing larger in northern climates, but this is not the case.

There has been genetic testing done on our coyotes, they have timber wolf ancestry. Probably from when they moved through Ontario and Quebec from the prairies. And I assure you, they are definitely not sterile.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4665
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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What's S.S.S ?

The ones in St. Catherine's Ontario look like a smaller wolf. They venture right into the city. Timberwolves stick to the shadows even in sparsely populated farm and forest areas. They avoid human contact.
 
martin doucet
Posts: 20
Location: New-Brunswick, Canada
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Miles Flansburg wrote:S.S.S


Lol. The third S isn't necessary here.
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