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Very early spring?

 
Posts: 63
Location: North Idaho, zone 5a
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We have an unusually warm February here. Temperatures are about 10C (20F) above normal, reaching 14C (57F) during the day. My perennials are waking up at least a month (or two?) before they "should" - currants, honeyberries, autumn olives, even some raspberries have swollen buds or even new leaves.
I've read somewhere about putting snow in the root area to prolong dormancy... but it looks like it's too late already. Will try to cover at least some plants when it is snowing or freezing hard.

Will they survive? Or, on the contrary, are we going to have a wonderful year with much longer than usual growing season?
 
Posts: 1576
Location: Fennville MI
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Will have to wait and see. It could mean a terrible year for the fruit crops that get clipped by a hard frost when they are budding/blooming.
 
Posts: 145
Location: Yakima county, Washington state
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we seem to be getting the same thing in the yakima county in washington, the bulbs are coming out, and we are located in the cooler parts of town.
One question, have you noticed the dramatic difference between our childhood memories of our weather?
 
Wi Tim
Posts: 63
Location: North Idaho, zone 5a
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I have only lived here for a few years. But others say there was no winter like that in the past 20 years.
 
master steward
Posts: 17291
Location: Pacific Northwest
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We've had no "winter" here in Western Washington. No snow at all since November, and some of the warmest months on record. We've even been up in the mid 60s--in January! Everything has buds, and bulbs are popping up. The flies and spiders and slugs are all up and moving. I even planted peas on January 29th, in case we never got any snow/really cold weather. Every few (5-7?) years we get depressing (to me who loves snow) winters like this, but none quite so warm, as the records show. Hopefully next year we'll get more colder weather, snow, and mountain snowpack. We'll also, I hope, get enough rain this spring and summer to not have drought conditions...
 
Posts: 166
Location: Kentucky 6b
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It's more of a yoyo effect over on the eastern side. We'll get a day in the 50's followed by a week with a high of 20, it's weird to say the least. Past few winters have been like this actually, though the previous winter was quite warm. Bad thing is I started planting my forest garden last fall so I've been keeping my fingers crossed none of the new transplants breaks dormancy
 
pollinator
Posts: 3171
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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In the past 2weeks we have gotten 70+ inches of snow. My backyard has a snow dept of 40+ inches. I am happy though this means that my mascadine grape are insulated and protected, same for my asian persimmon. They survived last winter and hopefully this one too.

Fall planting is the best, if the flower buds die back, then it just means that you will not have to manually kill the fruits and all the energy will go into root production like it ahould so that the next year it will have a good root system to handle the nutrient demand and weight demand of fruits.
 
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