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Soccer Field/Football Pitch  RSS feed

 
Starr Brainard
Posts: 39
Location: Duluth, MN
books dog urban
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What would a permaculture soccer field/football pitch look like? Is it AstroTurf so you don't waste water and maintenance energy? Is it waste water irrigated sod? Is it a sand field? I would love to hear people's thoughts.
 
tim rew
Posts: 13
Location: Cortland, NY USDA zone 5
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It would depend on location... here in the northeastern USA, it's just a big polyculture lawn, although you could get into the nitty gritty about how you mow it I suppose. It may take a while to mow an entire soccer field with my two foot wide rotary mower, even if that's the greenest option for my tiny lawn.
In Egypt, well, I have no idea. I assume it isn't sand, since nobody really wants sand kicked in their eyes (except volleyball players I guess), and AstroTurf has a lot of embodied energy, but it might still beat natural turf unless you have an awful lot of greywater not already being reused somewhere better.
Or maybe it really is sand, with sport goggles for all the players??
Hopefully someone with experience in arid climates will chime in. I think it's a great question.
 
Landon Sunrich
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Starr, you are in Cairo? Which side of the river? How far from?
 
Kelly Smith
Posts: 704
Location: In a rain shadow - Fremont County, Southern CO
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how often would it be used?

if it were to be infrequently - the pitch could look like a meadow during "normal" times and then mowed to make a field for "fun" times.

could you stack other functions into the space?
 
Starr Brainard
Posts: 39
Location: Duluth, MN
books dog urban
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I ask the question both in general curiosity for options around the world, and also for a specific site I am working on in Egypt. The place I am looking at is a public park in the southern Nile Delta. It's agricultural land irrigated with Nile water that is carried to the village by canal, but water conservation is still important. Currently the field there is just compacted earth and sand.

In my googling I found this the information below. It's an artificial sod company that uses organic infill. I wouldn't say these guys qualify as permaculture, but it might be the closest a person can get for a professional grade field (luckily not what I am going for).
http://www.geoturfusa.com/g/products/organic-infill/
http://www.geoturfusa.com/g/why-geo/environment/
 
Landon Sunrich
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Location: Western Washington
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Starr,

That's great as I can only answer from a standpoint of general curiosity!

I know it can get really really dry there at times. I was stranded in the Archeological Museum there in Cairo back in that Giant dust storm of '07! That Organic Infill is not going to do anyone any good if it dries, fries, and blows away to someplace else.

Seems to me like one of the best things to do might be to ring the field with trees. Figs or Dates perhaps? I mean for a start. Perhaps bare compacted earth really is the best solution for the area too. I mean if it gets a lot of food traffic and people are satisfied playing on it that is. Sounds like a great project. I'll have to keep the Idea on my mind. Maybe someone who actually knows what they're talking about in that setting will chime in, you never know. I bet Geoff would have a thing or two to say on this matter.
 
Mike Patterson
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Location: nemo, 5a/b
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We play soccer on clumpy, rutted out former pasture/prairie, and I must say, it is quite a different game. Remembering where the small multiflora rose bushes are makes good zonal defense.

-WY
 
Rebecca Norman
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Landon Sunrich wrote:Perhaps bare compacted earth really is the best solution for the area too. I mean if it gets a lot of food traffic and people are satisfied playing on it that is. Sounds like a great project.


That's what I think, too. Where I live is a desert and people play all the games on bare compacted earth: cricket, football (soccer), etc. It doesn't tend to kick sand up into your eyes if it's compacted, and in this environment everyone's used to that surface.
 
Jd Gonzalez
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Location: Virginia,USA zone 6
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I would explore using Zoysia grass , Bermuda grass or Buffalo grass. All of these require little water once established.
 
We should throw him a surprise party. It will cheer him up. We can use this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - boots-to-roots
https://permies.com/t/59706/permaculture-bootcamp-boots-roots
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