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Instead of working for free or for min wage, why not own land for the rest of your life?  RSS feed

 
Nick Hummel
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Looking to start a permaculture farm in North Florida, land is very cheap there, the property we're looking at right now is $875 and acre for a 40 acre property. We are looking for other people who want to join us in this endeavor. The idea is to have a large scale permaculture farm on the whole property, and then each individual or group that buys the land with us will have their own acre or two to homestead and do what they please. There are massive advantages to this property. For one, its $875 per acre, you could even purchase one acre with us if you'd like, the more people the better. Think about it, that's such a small amount of money to own land for the rest of your life and be able to build a house and homestead. Escape the debt trap and live free! The property is also a wetland, so there is massive amounts of water, the idea is to do earthworks to build out ponds and control the flow of water, think about the fertility and possibilities of this! Aquaculture opportunities abound! Also the climate is incredibly warm and allows for year round growing.

I have worked on permaculture farms for free, worked on organic farms for minimum wage, and still don't have my own land to see my vision through and have security for the rest of my life. I'm ready to make the leap and I need other people who want to do the same. Contact me for more info.
 
Jay Kepple
Posts: 33
Location: Dubuque, ia
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I'm ready!
 
Gioia De Amanti
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Can you give some more information about the property you are looking at?

Wetland - hmm - How high above sea level? - How is the profile of the property?
- What is growing there currently? How has the land been used priorly?
- Where exactly? Can you link to google maps?
- Is subdivision possible? - or how many habitations are allowed to be built on this land?
- Would it be a land trust? .....

Lots of questions to be answered...

 
Ken Peavey
steward
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Location: FL
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Pitch me
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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I think the number one question should be, --- Is it legal to convert this to anything other than a wetland?

Number two ---  Should it be preserved as a wildlife sanctuary ?

Often, the answers are 1. No   2.

Yes
.......
I suspect that the local council has already ruled on this in the past.  Best to check that out before proceeding.
 
Ken Peavey
steward
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Location: FL
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If I had specifics I could do the necessary checks.
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 567
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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Cool project! Glad you're moving toward freedom.

You might kickstarter it. Even if you can't get other owners to commit, doesn't have to hold you back. If you can get 1 acre you can support yourself. 2/10 of an acre was enough for the Dervaes's, in a cooler climate.

For wetlands, are there legal restrictions?

For handling overly wet areas, there were some good threads about that. geoff lawton had a video recently about dealing with floods, but your case is probably different. You want to build up. IF you can find dead logs and drag them to your land and just build up, build hugel beds, that might be good. Vines? something that will trellis up trees? Fast-growing trees--black locust if it's allowed, willow (you can grow them from a twig! and some grow FAST--there was a spiral willow that grew like 20' tall in five years), hell moringa olifiera will grow in that climate and even fruit! you can get seeds on ebay. Morniga I think would grow 9' in 11 months or something crazy like that, it's one of the fastest growers, and a great food supply too, rich in vitamins and minerals, grows in poor soil. That one needs draining, so it would have to be planted on the higher ground, but it would still soak up water once cut down and made into a hugel bed at the end of the year. Growing biomass on your land would save you having to drag it from faraway.

Keep us posted on how this goes! if this way tdoesn't work out there are millions of other ways to get where you want to go. Way to think outside the box! Oh, if it's legal wetlands, start the conversation with the board anyway, maybe they will see that you can add benefit to the wildlife in the area more than if it were bought by a developer. At least a permie is on the same basic page as the EPA/environmental board.
 
Joe Moraca
Posts: 10
Location: White Springs Florida 32096
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I wonder if you have fully researched this before posting? What county is it? I think things may get complicated quickly with the land in a "wetland" or 100 year flood plain if you plan on "subdividing" to allow individual ownership of the land so don't count on that. Also most counties are very strict on septic systems and 'rules' if you want electric power. I am in Columbia county near where Ken lives and just went through the "full process" in the past year.

I am sure there are ways it could work with shared ownership and off grid living.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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