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micro propagation

 
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Does anyone know anything about micro propagation? Is there any reason to avoid plants or trees that have been grown using this process. Here in Uruguay some of the fruit and nut trees that are available through nurseries have been grown from micro propagation and apart from what I have read I do not have enough information to make an educated decision on whether to use this kind of product in a food forest project I am currently working on.

Thanks
 
pollinator
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Location: Bothell, WA - USA
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Micropropogation is used commercially for trees in orchards - especially new varieties with very limited supply of genetic material..
I haven't heard any issue with it beyond the higher cost ..
 
gardener
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Micro propagation is simply another term for cloning a plant from a small bit of material.

We (the Nursery industry) use this method to get more plants from a limited amount of genetic material which we are developing.
There are no ill effects of using plants propagated by the methods used.

Agar is the normal growing medium until there is enough material grown to transplant into a soil or other substrate.
The method usually is incorporated when we need a set of plants with the same DNA to get a seed program going, starting specimens can be as small as a clipping from a leaf tip, to as large as a whole leaf.
These are then placed in an agar that is prepared with 6% hormone, 12% B-Complex, and some proprietary cloning liquid, the clippings are held in place till the agar mix sets and holds the material in position.
Once there is enough cellular growth, the clones are placed in potting mix that contains rooting hormones and bottom heated to induce good root formation.
Once the roots are formed and the plants are potted up, they are treated just like any seed sprouted plant.
If you buy a plant created this way, it will be at least 6 months old but more likely trees will be at least two years old.
 
Bruce Kirk
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Okay great,thanks for the information.
 
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