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Can I Plant a Cherry Tree Next to a Rose Bush?  RSS feed

 
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I have, growing wild on my property, a native Nootka Rose bush. I seems to love to spread, and that doesn't really bother me because I don't have to worry about my supply of rose hips and petals going away. The only problem is that it is about 2.5 feet from where I'd like to plant my Bing Cherry tree. Will they interfere with each other and make one or the other more unhealthy or disease-prone? Anyone have any experience or knowledge? Thanks!
 
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I've seen lots of rose hips near all kinds of fruit trees and they were healthy old tree bearing healthy fruit.
My only concern is harvest of cherries which can be a pain if you don't have enough room - fighting your way through thorns to get to the fruit.
 
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As long as the cherry tree will not shade the rose, you are going to be fine with the placements.
If the rose is in the way of harvesting the cherries, a trellis might be the way to go for the rose, the rose you mention is a climber and will really like a trellis to get the canes away from the ground, which will also reduce any disease issues.
 
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:As long as the cherry tree will not shade the rose, you are going to be fine with the placements.
If the rose is in the way of harvesting the cherries, a trellis might be the way to go for the rose, the rose you mention is a climber and will really like a trellis to get the canes away from the ground, which will also reduce any disease issues.



Hmm, maybe it isn't a nootka rose, then. It is only about three feet tall, and spreading by rhizomes, but at a very slow rate. It also doesn't, for that matter, make normal rose hips--they are brown and tiny. Is it just in a bad spot, or diseased, or just a different wild rose than I know about? I'll have to post a picture of it come summer to see if anyone can identify it. I'll make sure, for now, to keep it pruned back from the cherry so it doesn't interfere too much with the picking, and to help prevent the spread of disease.

Aljaz Plankl wrote:I've seen lots of rose hips near all kinds of fruit trees and they were healthy old tree bearing healthy fruit.

That's really good to know!

Aljaz PlanklMy only concern is harvest of cherries which can be a pain if you don't have enough room - fighting your way through thorns to get to the fruit. [/quote wrote: Good point (or points, if we're referring to the thorns on the rose bushes )! I'll make sure to keep it pruned back from the cherry.

 
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I'll second Aljaz and add that that is my experience regionally as well.
 
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This is a description of Rosa Nutkana or the Nootka Rose.

Nooka Rose is a Northwest native extending from northern California into Alaska. It is best known for its attractive pink blooms, and red rose hips that persist in the winter.

Morphology:
Nootka Rose is a fast-growing, deciduous, erect shrub that can attain a height of 6’ with an equal spread. New plants arise from the mother plant via underground runners.

Leaves are pinnately compound, with five to nine ovate and serrated leaflets. At the base of the leaves is a pair of thorns. Leaflets are arranged in an alternate fashion.

Flowers appear from May through July. They are pink, about 2” across and subtle but sweet smelling. Each flower has five petals and five sepals.

Stems have varying numbers of thorns.

Flowers give rise to red fruit known as hips and are large (½” - ¾” long) and round.

Adaptation:
Nootka Rose grows in both full sun and partial shade. It can tolerate flooding and can grow well on a host of different soil types. Summer drought does not have a real effect on this species.
 
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