• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

oyster mushrooms straw substrate help please  RSS feed

 
Brooks Mattox
Posts: 13
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I started these oyster mushrooms from organically grown store bought ones. I took tissue from inner part of the mushroom. (Strain unknown) but I think it is the pale oyster. The ones one cardboard colonized in approximately two weeks and the in BRF and Ver. took about three and a half weeks. I got some gallon clear plastic bags and filled the with pasteurized straw. Two of the three bags got green mold so I discarded them. I am left with one bag and it seems to be not colonizing as fast as it did on the cardboard and BRF and ver.. I keep the temperature around 65-70 degrees F. They are growing slowly but surely. I was just wondering when do I know they are fully colonized and ready to fruit. I added some pictures. If anyone has any helpful tips and tricks and I'd be very appreciative. If you need to see more pictures to understand where I stand I'd be more and happy to add. THANKS!
1425949574101.jpg
[Thumbnail for 1425949574101.jpg]
oysters in straw substrait
1425950468466.jpg
[Thumbnail for 1425950468466.jpg]
 
Landon Sunrich
pollinator
Posts: 1703
Location: Western Washington
21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When it's fully colonized it will be a white netted mass.
 
John Saltveit
gardener
Posts: 2049
62
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yeah the mycelium will hook everything together in a clump. It will all look white. It will be throughout.
John S
PDX OR
 
chad Christopher
Posts: 299
Location: Pittsburgh PA
9
chicken duck forest garden fungi trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There is a website, shroomery dot org. That is mostly drug related, but have an outstanding forum, which I have found the best and most accurate information when it comes to fungi.
But, er to Mt experience, the bag looks like you have some cobwebs. No good. But good news is. Oysters love being outside. So let that bag colonize mold or not. You can make some spawn, spores, ect. I just wouldn't recommend eating what looks like to me, in my experience; mold. Let it grow nonetheless, it will smell like a big ball of mushers when it's done. I recommend a nice bath and cold shock before you pin those bags.
 
Wi Tim
Posts: 63
Location: North Idaho, zone 5a
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tried several times to start with store-bought mushrooms, and did not have any luck. Sooner or later, all of them got moldy. (I blame not having a sterile environment). And the ones that got moldy later, still grew very slowly from the very start.
As a result, at this point I find buying grain spawn more economical. I then multiply it by sterilizing more grain in a pressure canner; so I can use more grain to inoculate the straw and it gets colonized really fast.

Did you make little holes in the bag so that the mycelium can breath? It does not look very healthy to me...
 
Brooks Mattox
Posts: 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes I put several small holes in the bag. When I look at it up close it is white throughout. Little fine hairs connect ing it all together. The pictures don't do justice for it. My phone don't take the best pictures. I tried to add the photos of the BRF and ver and cardboard spawn I started. It had a mild sweet smell and the stuff was caked together tightly but the images would not upload kept saying error. The problem I think I'm having is, the bottom 1/4 of the bag has to much moisture. also since I brought the temperature up to around 75-80.degrees it seems to be growing faster. I'll try to take a better picture of the what I believe is mycilum growing throughout the bag.
 
Wi Tim
Posts: 63
Location: North Idaho, zone 5a
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Then maybe adding holes near the bottom could help get rid of the excess water?
 
Brooks Mattox
Posts: 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes I tried that seems to be doing better. Thanks for all the help guys. Do any of you guys know anything about adding gypsum to your substrate for quicker colonization?
 
John Saltveit
gardener
Posts: 2049
62
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It is generally recommended. I have added some to an outdoor bed. Some species have recipes.
John S
PDX OR
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!