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Looking for Prunus angustifolia (Chickasaw Plum) Varieties

 
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Anyone growing Chickasaw plums? I've only been able to find one variety that is available, which is Guthrie. I'm looking for: Newman, Caddo Chief, Lonestar, Wild Goose, Helm, Robinson, Mariana Weaver, Golden Beauty, Jennie Lucas, and/or any other promising selection/cultivars.
 
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Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
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I grow angustifolia here, where they grow wild and are known as "sand plums" -- just one of their many regional names. Honestly I had never heard of any of your named cultivars before; people go wildcraft them along the back roads or they transplant a few wild ones into their yard and wait for a thicket to appear (which is what I'm doing).

Here in early summer when they ripen I should have a bunch of seeds to share. But I don't have any source info for the cultivars you are looking for, sorry!
 
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Dan Boone wrote:I grow angustifolia here, where they grow wild and are known as "sand plums" -- just one of their many regional names. Honestly I had never heard of any of your named cultivars before; people go wildcraft them along the back roads or they transplant a few wild ones into their yard and wait for a thicket to appear (which is what I'm doing).

Here in early summer when they ripen I should have a bunch of seeds to share. But I don't have any source info for the cultivars you are looking for, sorry!



I grow a selected yellow one here in Houston. I call it Rohde after the late fruit explorer who found it. Bob Randall
 
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I've got a really suckery one that I've been grafting peaches, plums and nectarines onto. Actually just posted a video today. Check it out: http://www.floridasurvivalgardening.com/2015/05/video-of-nectarines-peaches-and-plums.html

The fruit taste good but it hasn't set very many yet.
 
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There's a variety of wild Chickasaw plum here on my new homestead just east of panama city, fl. Produces good edible quality fruits as is from wild stock. Personally like them just as much as improved cultivars but then my palate is easy to impress. Would be into other varieties from elsewhere in the south. Maybe a trade is in order if anyone is interested.

Reach me at cderek83@gmail.com

Thanks!
 
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I have one Chickasaw plum tree. I planted it in summer of 2016. The winter of 2017 was miserably warm (for chill-hour-needing plants, not comfort-craving humans) and everything bloomed early. It probably had 300 blooms on it that all dies when the late freeze arrived. I noticed yesterday (Jan, 2018) that it looks like the blossoms are starting to open early again, and that means they will most likely be killed by another late freeze. I wonder if it will do this every year. At least it will feed my bees.
 
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Hi David,
Oikos Tree Crops sells Wild Goose:  https://oikostreecrops.com/products/edible-fruits/plums/wild-goose-plum/
Cheers
 
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