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The first edibles of spring are emerging  RSS feed

 
Ginger Keenan
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I am writing to report on the first edibles of spring that are emerging. There are hundreds of acorns just starting to sprout. Just like sprouting almonds, chia, or any nut or seed, the nutritional values for sprouts is higher than the dormant form. I would guess that much of the tannins leached out over winter.

My planted perennial french sorrel has emerged and is a family favorite that we fight over

The leaves of the common daisy have barely emerged and taste AMAZING.

The daylilies have leaves that are ready to harvest.

The chickweeds looks ready to nibble on too.

What have you found that is ready to eat in zone 4-5?
 
Kim Hill
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I am in Zone 5 and have been eating off the land for a few weeks now. So far I have popping up dandelion, wood sorrel in tiny amounts, French sorrel in large amounts, walking onions, garlic sprouts, hosta shoots, lettuce seedlings from seeds sprinkled out last fall and enough mint and lemon balm leaves along with raspberry leaves for a nice cuppa tea daily. My started plants went into the ground last weekend consisting of brussel sprouts, kohlrabi, cabbage, broccoli and kale. I can snip off leaves to add to green smoothies daily as well. The fruit trees are just starting to break bud as well! Maybe spring is finally here.
 
Dandridge Smith
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Location: N 38.24324 W -77.312036 Central/Costal Virginia Zone 7a
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I am in 7a and have also been eating fresh/wild for quite a few weeks (eating all winter from unheated covered raised beds); violets, field garlic, chickweed, dandelion, clover, day lilies, hostas, sorrel, etc. . . . . the 8 raised 4x12 beds under hoops/1 layer of agrifab all winter; very protected placement - flanked between two outbuildings east & west and a very old well established grape vine on the north side a wind break. All beds were planted with cold hardy crops in Sept, most are now bolting or already blooming/going to seed as we've had a few 70F+ days already. Apple, plum, apricot, mulberry & peach trees leafed & bloomed - fig trees got burnt again by late frost, so will be late coming out.
IMG_0069.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_0069.jpg]
over wintered raised beds 04/2015
 
Ginger Keenan
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Dandridge,those greens look amazing! Our last snow pile just melted away yesterday...
 
Feidhlim Harty
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Location: Ireland
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Hi Tracy, and thanks for bringing this to the light. Here in Ireland, we've got fresh dandelion leaves coming up; along with nettles, sorrel and some "weeds" that are popping up in our beds and tunnel - land cress, fennel, garlic chives, garlic greens, All of which are fairly neglected, but coping well despite being mostly volunteers in the garden.

If anyone near the Ennis area is reading this, we've a Wild Food and Forging talk coming up this Wednesday Feb 22nd. See Garden of Eden Projects Ireland facebook page or wildkitchen.ie for details
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
pollinator
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Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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I found this picture with help of google, and the English name of it too (I only knew it in Dutch: 'kleine veldkers'). This bittercress is growing between the tiles in the front yard (and many other places in the neighbourhood).
 
Hans Quistorff
pollinator
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Location: Longbranch, WA
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I believe that  land cress and water cress are phenotypes. When the seed grows in soil it rapidly bolts to seed gefore the land dries out but in running water it grows into large masses rerooting many times. If someone has a waterfall fountain or aquaponic system could they please run an  experiment by transplanting one int the water and see wat happens.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
pollinator
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Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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bike dog forest garden urban
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Walking along the back alley I saw the first small leaves appear of Aegopodium podagraria. I don't know what you call it, the Dutch name is 'zevenblad', meaning 'seven leaf'. It's one of my favourite wild edibles. Young leaves can be used raw in a salad or potato mash, when they're a little larger they can still be cooked, f.e. in soup, saut├ęd / stirr fried, or used as herbal tea.
Here a photo from wikipedia
 
jeff bankes
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I have been putting chickweed and wood sorrel on my burgers instead of lettuce.
It's awesome !
 
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