• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Another Hugel Newb.

 
Aj Hans
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I put in my first (container) garden this year, and it's doing well enough. While surfing the 'net for info, I stumbled over a few sites describing hugelkultur. Well, heck, I have a tractor and whatnot, and it sounds like a great idea, so starting yesterday evening, I dug in a bed.
First layer:




Second layer, nice pre-rotten cottonwood.






Third layer, neighbor's grass clippings, yard waste, and etc. That's four scoops from my little Kubota compressed into the bed of my crawler.





Now, I know that I should soak it well with water before burying it. I don't have any manure, but I do have a few lbs. of ammonium sulfate. Should I go ahead and spread a pound or two over the pile to boost the nitrogen?

And, what the heck should I plant on it in July?

 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2295
76
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You don't have to throw any ammonium sulphate on it unless you plant to plant it with a high feeding crop, like corn. If you still have time in your zone to plant winter squash, try that. I have had some nice results with July hugels that I have planted to butternut squash.
 
Aj Hans
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks. I'll throw some squash and maybe some black raspberries on it and leave the rest fallow until winter veggie time.
It's bigger than it looks in the pics, about 7'X15'.
 
Shane McClellan
Posts: 7
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
sepp holzer recommends planting right away but speaking from experience I would dump as much water for as long as you can to saturate your mounds so as to promote deep root sets and minimalize the need for irrigation. Also it is good to see the mounds with a poly culture that will have a variety of root depths especially something with some serious root length to it so as to help pull up the moisture hidden down within. It looks like you did an excellent job layering so I imagine the rest of your plans will turn out stellar as long as you continue on that path. Happy hugelkulture and please keep us updated!
 
Roy Hinkley
Posts: 200
Location: S. Ontario Canada
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It doesn't look like you added any soil between wood layers so there will be a lot of settling as the voids fill in. Water well, fix up the surface depressions, and cover crop with clover till fall planting.
 
Aj Hans
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I didn't put any soil between the layers, but my layering plan was large, non-rotten material on the bottom, small non-rotten material in the middle, rotten wood on top of that, followed by my neighbor's grass clippings and yard/garden waste.
Watering and laying down some clover sounds like my next move. Thanks for the advice.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic