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if it looks like raspberry and taste like one is it a raspberry?  RSS feed

 
Gregory Silling
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Location: Northeast - 5B
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Some bird, bear, deer must have volunteered this years ago and for awhile it was just a couple of thorny stems...

I always meant to take it out but it provided a natural barricade to an abandoned stairway that had become mossy and dangerous. this year it suddenly became very productive.

We think its a rasberry plant.

thanks for the help!

Greg
rasberry-1.jpg
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Rasberry-2.jpg
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David Livingston
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Are you sure you have the correct pic ?
 
Gregory Silling
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lol David

here are the correct pics

Thanks

Greg
rasberry-a.jpg
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rasberry-b.jpg
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Mike Cantrell
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It's not necessarily a raspberry, but it is safe to eat. All compound berries (the ones made up of a cluster of little sacs of juice with a seed inside) like blackberries, raspberries, and mulberries are good to eat. Some taste better than others, but they're all safe.
 
Charli Wilson
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cat chicken urban
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Raspberries tend to be upright, blackberries tend to sprawl along the floor and spread.

Also, raspberries- when taken from the plant the middle of the berry comes out and stays with the plant (like a white cone)- with blackberries the cone stays in the berry and you eat it.

You can get red blackberries, and yellow raspberries- just to confuse things. All are good to eat.

From that picture and the sprawly habit of the vine I'd say it was a blackberry of some kind, but I could be wrong.
 
Hester Winterbourne
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I don't think there is a member of the genus Rubus which ever did harm to anyone. This one in particular looks a bit like a wineberry. However, the "compound berry" theory isn't quite true because I've seen honeysuckle berries do a pretty good imitation. Just saying.
 
Gregory Silling
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Location: Northeast - 5B
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ok here is the berry and yes the cone stays behind... as usual I do not tend to send enough info the first time around, and Im not sure this is gonna change anything but heres the photo... I have also discover an area about 20' x 30' in the woods chock full of these brambles and berries

thanks for the lively debate... I appreciate everyone taking the time to chime in.

That is my 12 years old hand and She is about 5'6".

Rasberry-c.jpg
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Mike Cantrell
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Hester, what species of honeysuckle, do you know?

Tartarian honeysuckle has two berries joined, but that shouldn't fool anybody. I haven't heard of any others, but I'd love to know about them if they exist.
 
Hester Winterbourne
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Oh yum!
 
Bryant RedHawk
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certainly look to be raspberries. in the genus there are several different species some sweet and some bitter. Blackberry, Raspberry, Wineberry, Thistleberry, Cloudberry, Dewberry are just a few that are eaten widely.
 
Gregory Silling
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these are yummy a good balance of sweet/sour !! This is my best gardening ever .... I did nothing they are all volunteers...whatever they are! Now should I let them stay wild or should I prune/ train... will that result in a better yield and more manageable... meaning not have to work around canes growing any which way? thanks for all the input...
 
Charli Wilson
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Ok, now I say wineberry too! they're a brilliant colour!

Wineberry plants tend to have 'hairs' rather than spines... but then the 'hairs' are rather spikey so its a small distinction!
 
Bryant RedHawk
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If you like them, I would certainly make them more manageable and perhaps even put them on trellises. On our Farm we had over two acres of wild Blackberries which were nothing but bitter, we are still pulling and digging them out, leaving just a little patch here and there for the bees. Nothing else is attracted to them so we are removing most all of them, by hand and shovel and pick. Eventually we may plant some better cultivars or Boysenberries which I prefer to eat.
 
Hester Winterbourne
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Mike Cantrell wrote:Hester, what species of honeysuckle, do you know?

Tartarian honeysuckle has two berries joined, but that shouldn't fool anybody. I haven't heard of any others, but I'd love to know about them if they exist.


Our native honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum it wouldn't fool anyone who had any gut feeling for plants, I know, but it could fool a young inexperienced child. I'm just being pedantic really
 
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