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Brendan Danley
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#1
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Brendan Danley
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#2 Maybe not-fully-opened Violet Bush Clover? Not a very good foliage shot. I'm pretty sure the leaves were trifoliate.
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Brendan Danley
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#3 Growing in the shade on the side of my house.
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Joseph Lofthouse
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#2 looks like "Sweet Pea" to me. At my place they are perennial. They make seeds, but I've had a hard time growing them from seed.
 
Brendan Danley
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:
#2 looks like "Sweet Pea" to me. At my place they are perennial. They make seeds, but I've had a hard time growing them from seed.


Thanks Joseph! That looks like it to me too. This one was just growing wild on the edge of our forest.
 
Hester Winterbourne
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Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b)
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#3 are the leaves scented? looks like a double flowered feverfew.
 
Hester Winterbourne
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#1 looks most like a member of the Borage family, like Green Alkanet, but the flowers look too fleshy somehow. would help to know what continent these are on! I agree #2 looks like a perennial sweet pea.
 
Brendan Danley
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Hester Winterbourne wrote:#3 are the leaves scented? looks like a double flowered feverfew.


Thanks for the help Hester! The leaves of #3 are scented! Quite a nice scent too! Are there varieties of this that don't have the yellow center? I never noticed this plant with any yellow but I may have missed it.

#1 was found in North America, in the Ozark Mountains. I am stumped on it so far. The flowers do remind me a bit of borage type flowers, but they are much smaller than most in that family I am familiar with.
 
Hester Winterbourne
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I'll admit that if it is double feverfew, it's an unusually green-flowered one, but I don't think it would be outside the bounds of possibility given that other members of the chrysanthemum tribe have been bred with green flowers. Very pretty anyway!
 
Brendan Danley
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Hester Winterbourne wrote:I'll admit that if it is double feverfew, it's an unusually green-flowered one, but I don't think it would be outside the bounds of possibility given that other members of the chrysanthemum tribe have been bred with green flowers. Very pretty anyway!


Can you use the double flowered feverfew the same as the regular old one? I would guess yes...
 
Hester Winterbourne
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Brendan Danley wrote:

Can you use the double flowered feverfew the same as the regular old one? I would guess yes...


I would also say yes, especially for any uses of the leaves. I would guess that with the flowers, depending on which part of the flower contained the active ingredient, the effect might be slightly different.

I used to be fascinated by this plant as a child, it seeded with prolific abandon in my back garden, but was the single flowered golden leaved variety. Now a golden leaved double would be the best of both worlds!
 
Mike Turner
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Location: Upstate SC
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#1 is Cynoglossum virginianum (wild comfrey)
#2 is Lathyrus latifolius (perennial pea)
 
Brendan Danley
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Mike Turner wrote:#1 is Cynoglossum virginianum (wild comfrey)
#2 is Lathyrus latifolius (perennial pea)


Thank you Mike!
 
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