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optimal geometries in tiny houses  RSS feed

 
Jake Parkhurst
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Hello Dan!

I was wondering if there are particular geometries that you try to promote in tiny house design. I currently live in a dome and I have found it inconvenient to have walls that aren't straight up and down. However, since a tiny house is so small and demands that you use every nook and cranny, I could see a normally tricky geometry having its benefits. (Example: I saw a circular bedroom in a tiny house that had lazy suzan style drawers and book shelves.)

Thank you,
Jake
 
Rose Pinder
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Location: Otago, New Zealand
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My experience of building and living in a tiny home is that square is better. Consider a corner and how much storage space you get from a square compared to a circle. However, much of this comes down to how much stuff you have and how many people are living in the home. I like to optimise storage, so I go for square.

I also found that square was much easier to build and design (compared to say a bus refit with curves).
 
Dan Louche
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I agree with Rose. With a tiny house on wheels you are confirmed to a maximum 8'6" wide and 13'6" tall. So the most of that area you can fill the better as far as maximizing living space goes. Event a gable roof is not as efficient at filling the area as a shed style roof, which we often recommend to those trying to get the absolute most area in their loft.
 
Jake Parkhurst
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Rose and Dan,

Ok, I suspected that rectangular geometry would work out to be the easiest to work with. That being said, a) have either of you found occasions where curves were better suited given the circumstances, and b) do you have tips (or suggested resources) for working with curves if the need should arise?

Thank you both for your advice!
Jake
 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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The kind of roof a "gypsy" wagon has seems great, almost flat, comparable to a shed style roof.
Using right angles is like painting everything white, every thing matches, more or less.
I am curious , has anyone here used built a "reverse loft" , bed on the floor , kitchen or whatever above?
It seems like this would save steps, which could save room, and be more convenient.
 
Jake Parkhurst
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Hello William,

Not exactly what you described, but the bedroom is down below:


 
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