• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Plant ID Extravaganza! Thanks!  RSS feed

 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#1
wildflower-5-best.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-5-best.JPG]
wildflower-5-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-5-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#2
wildflower-6.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-6.JPG]
wildflower-6-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-6-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#3
wildflower-7.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-7.JPG]
wildflower-7-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-7-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#4
wildflower-4.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-4.JPG]
wildflower-4-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-4-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#5
wildflower-3.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-3.JPG]
wildflower-3-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-3-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#6
wildflower-2best.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-2best.JPG]
wildflower-2-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-2-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#7 some type of goldenrod? with a soldier beetle.
wildflower-2.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-2.JPG]
wildflower-2-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-2-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#8 Another goldenrod?
wildlower-4.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildlower-4.JPG]
wildflower-4-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-4-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#9
wildflower-3.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-3.JPG]
wildflower-3-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-3-foliage.JPG]
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#10
wildflower-1.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-1.JPG]
wildflower-1-foliage.JPG
[Thumbnail for wildflower-1-foliage.JPG]
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1155
Location: northern northern california
71
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
wowie that is an extravaganza...

actually i am stumped or unsure on many, but this is what i got for you -

#1 looks a lot like wild lettuce in the foilage, but not in the flower. some rare type of wild lettuce is my guess

#2 reminds me of a hibiscus, particularly the seed pod photos. so some kind of hibiscus or malva family.

#3 i dont know the name, but i recognize it by having weeded it out.

#4 i think it is sedum, that seems to be one of the more common types? pic of sedum

#6 is bindweed ish, morning glory, bindweed.

# 9 is it monarda ? some kind of bee balm, or bergamont?
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
leila hamaya wrote:wowie that is an extravaganza...

actually i am stumped or unsure on many, but this is what i got for you -

#1 looks a lot like wild lettuce in the foilage, but not in the flower. some rare type of wild lettuce is my guess

#2 reminds me of a hibiscus, particularly the seed pod photos. so some kind of hibiscus or malva family.

#3 i dont know the name, but i recognize it by having weeded it out.

#4 i think it is sedum, that seems to be one of the more common types? pic of sedum

#6 is bindweed ish, morning glory, bindweed.

# 9 is it monarda ? some kind of bee balm, or bergamont?


Thanks Leila! #1 is definitely something in the Aster family. I think you nailed #4. My first thought on #6 was bindweed, but I couldn't find any flowers in pictures that matched exactly. Definitely Morning Glory family at least, I'd say. While #9 is similar to bee balm/bergamot, I am familiar with those. It may be related, but is something different, I think. Thanks for your help!
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1155
Location: northern northern california
71
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

hey cool. well we got closer on a few, maybe some more answers will come in.

of all of them i would be most interested in # 2 . i love the hibiscus family.
or maybe it is from the extended cousins of that family of plants. its very large, with okras and cotton being distant relatives, mallows, alcea althea then theres stuff like malopes, and other types. i dont know all of them but those pods i have seen something like them before...on a different kind of plant with different flowers though...


but those seed pods are pretty distinctive.

malvaceae seed pods

 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1155
Location: northern northern california
71
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
ooo i think i found it ======>>>

Abutilon theophrasti

or at least much closer, maybe??

or other related plant :

Abutilon indicum

 
Joylynn Hardesty
pollinator
Posts: 291
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
27
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#10
Eupatorium serotinum Late Boneset
http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/prairie/plantx/late_bonesetx.htm
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
leila hamaya wrote:ooo i think i found it ======>>>

Abutilon theophrasti

or at least much closer, maybe??

or other related plant :

Abutilon indicum



Whammo! Nice Leila! It cracks me up when an article lists a plant as both "invasive/damaging" AND Edible. lol Apparently the leaves can be eaten. I find this is the case with many so called weeds.
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Joylynn Hardesty wrote:#10
Eupatorium serotinum Late Boneset
http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/prairie/plantx/late_bonesetx.htm


I thought it might be Boneset of some sort. Thanks Joylynn!
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1155
Location: northern northern california
71
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Brendan Danley wrote:
leila hamaya wrote:ooo i think i found it ======>>>

Abutilon theophrasti

or at least much closer, maybe??

or other related plant :

Abutilon indicum



Whammo! Nice Leila! It cracks me up when an article lists a plant as both "invasive/damaging" AND Edible. lol Apparently the leaves can be eaten. I find this is the case with many so called weeds.


i really cant see why anyone would think this one, or any of the wild mallows, was invasive /damaging. one of the awesome things about the hibiscus/mallow/etc family is that they are all edible. and every single part of the plant is edible, roots, stalk, leaf, seeds, and flower, of every single hibiscus/mallow/malva/althea/alcea/etc are all edible.
this starts to change once you get over towards the cotton side of the extended family though.

but even the common wild mallow, this one gets bad rap for being a weed/invasive, and i think its pretty good tasting.
i never weed it out, its a nice ground cover, and i like to pick a few of the better looking leaves for a big salad with other greens. the little flowers are yummy too...

but then in some parts of the world, that experienced starvation at some point they can still remember, and were then saved by eating tons of the mallow plant (malva neglecta "cheeseweed") hold it in high regard and actively cultivate it....ahhh a mallow ramble, but something from the random junk drawer of my mind, i remember reading about this, and i liked it =)
 
Rose Pinder
Posts: 410
Location: Otago, New Zealand
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#3 looks like willow weed, whatever your local Persicaria spp is.

http://naturewatch.org.nz/observations/381867
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rose Pinder wrote:#3 looks like willow weed, whatever your local Persicaria spp is.

http://naturewatch.org.nz/observations/381867


Thank you Rose! According to my field guide we have 18 species of that genus in the Ozarks. Some type of "smartweed." Thanks for your help!
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
here ya go Leila!

Dwarf-Mallow.JPG
[Thumbnail for Dwarf-Mallow.JPG]
 
mitch brant
Posts: 70
Location: Western Pa
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some of these are already answered
1. Prickly Lettuce
2. VelvetLeaf
3. Smartweed of some type
4. Stonecrop/Sedum
5. False Foxglove
6. Bindweed of some type

Agree with the previous poster about Common Mallow and Hibiscus (including Rose of Sharon). Most, if not all of them are edible.
 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 398
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
23
books dog food preservation forest garden goat trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
1 -- Looks rather exotic. I have no idea.
2 -- Velvet leaf (Abutilon theophrasti ) The oil is valuable, and the seeds are edible cooked in soups
or dried and powdered for flour. The fiber from the stalks make a good substitute for jute. It is kind of invasive, however -- it grows all over in our garden and I tend to pull it up since I don't really have a way to press the oil or make string. Maybe someday...
3 -- Knotweed (Polygonum spp. )
4 -- Flowers look like wild garlic (Allium sp.) but those succulent leaves are wrong. Almost looks like a butterflyweed of some sort too, but I'm guessing it is actually a sedum.
5 -- Smooth yellow false foxglove (Aureolaria flava) Beautiful plant! It grows wild in our woods and is always a pretty thing to happen upon when out walking. Hummingbirds love them.
6 -- Wild sweet potato vine (Ipomea pandurata) -- has edible, starchy roots.
7 -- Saint Johnswort? Unless this photo is an extreme close up of only one flower on a spike. (Or could be St. Andrew's cross -- they look very much alike. Hypericum spp.)
8 -- Definitely a goldenrod -- (Solidago spp.)
9 -- Joe Pyeweed (Eupatorium purpureum) A great butterfly plant.
10 -- Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) Related to Joe pyeweed and another good plant for the butterfly garden. Apparently native Americans used it for healing broken bones, though it has other uses in the pioneer pharmacopia as well.
 
mitch brant
Posts: 70
Location: Western Pa
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Deb Stephens wrote:
6 -- Wild sweet potato vine (Ipomea pandurata) -- has edible, starchy roots.
Yes. You are right. Bindweed lobes are higher on the leaves.

7 -- Saint Johnswort? Unless this photo is an extreme close up of only one flower on a spike. (Or could be St. Andrew's cross -- they look very much alike. Hypericum spp.)
Doesn't St. Johnswort have fewer petals? St. Andrew's even has fewer petals.

9 -- Joe Pyeweed (Eupatorium purpureum) A great butterfly plant.
Looks like Knapweed of some sort. The coloring is more like Ironweed, but the leaves are wrong, and I never seen Joe Pye Weed with multiple leaflets, but I may be wrong. Also flowers for Joe Pye weed are not as generally as deep purple as those shown.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
pollinator
Posts: 291
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
27
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I do not think #1 is prickly lettuce, though the leaves are similar. OP pic has far fewer petals, and they are more ovate. Here are several pics of prickly lettuce, in diferent stages:
http://www.toronto-wildlife.com/Plants/Aster_family/lettuce/more_prickly_lettuce.html
Brendan, how do the flowers appear when going to seed?



Re: #10 This is not common bonest (Eupatorium perfoliatum), though one source I found gave it similar uses to common boneset. Uses for common boneset: http://medicinalherbinfo.org/herbs/Boneset.html Notice the leaf axils in the following pics, I think table 37 is the best representation: http://www.henriettes-herb.com/galleries/plants/eupatorium.html Common boneset has 2 opposite leaves fused togeter around the stem or branches of the plant.


Late Boneset has petioles, or a short stem distancing the leaves from the branches of the plant. See second pic. http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/prairie/plantx/late_bonesetx.htm

 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 398
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
23
books dog food preservation forest garden goat trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
mitch brant wrote:
Deb Stephens wrote:
6 -- Wild sweet potato vine (Ipomea pandurata) -- has edible, starchy roots.
Yes. You are right. Bindweed lobes are higher on the leaves.

7 -- Saint Johnswort? Unless this photo is an extreme close up of only one flower on a spike. (Or could be St. Andrew's cross -- they look very much alike. Hypericum spp.)
Doesn't St. Johnswort have fewer petals? St. Andrew's even has fewer petals.

9 -- Joe Pyeweed (Eupatorium purpureum) A great butterfly plant.
Looks like Knapweed of some sort. The coloring is more like Ironweed, but the leaves are wrong, and I never seen Joe Pye Weed with multiple leaflets, but I may be wrong. Also flowers for Joe Pye weed are not as generally as deep purple as those shown.


Mitch, I don't think #9 is knapweed -- unless possibly spotted knapweed. The flowers look similar, but knapweeds have basal rosettes and the flowers are usually held on kind of straggly-looking, slender stems, and the leaves are lobed -- more finely cut and/or "pointy" at the ends. Ironweed is very similar, but usually has elongated, slender leaves with rough hairs on the surface. The flowers are more right for ironweed though. Anyway, I'm not positive about the Joe Pye Weed ID, (I constantly confuse it with ironweed for some reason) but it looks like one or the other more than knapweed. The leaves don't really look exactly right for any of them, though. My best guess at this point is Missouri Ironweed (Vernonia missurica).

As for St.Johnswort and St. Andrew's Cross -- you're right. I wasn't paying close attention to the number of petals, just color, the thick cluster of stamens and overall shape. (It was late, what can I say? ) It would help to know the size of the blooms. I couldn't tell if this was a closeup of one bloom in a group or spike, or a single flower at normal distance. Looking a bit more carefully, I think it may, indeed, be a goldenrod of some sort. Hard to tell without a shot of the whole plant, rather than the closeup alone. There are a LOT of Solidago species, so several shots at different distances would be helpful. Guessing it could be Solidago virgaurea, but that is only a guess based on the petal numbers and shape.
 
Brendan Danley
Posts: 111
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow! Thank you all so much for your awesomeness. A few things to consider…

#1 This one has been a total pain in my butt! I am pretty sure it is not prickly lettuce as the leaves are smaller and flowers are not yellow and have 9 petals. The flowers are very similar to False Garlic, but with 3 more petals. I will check out the seeds and gather more info.

#6. We have Ipomea pandurate in the bottom of the property and these flowers are much smaller,. There are only maybe ½” across. Certainly the same family, but I’m pretty sure what is pictured is not Ipomea pandurate. I’ll attach a picture for comparison.

#7 is, in fact, a close up of one flower on a spike. I think it may be Solidago petiolaris. Woodland Goldenrod, but I am not positive.

#9 Mitch, my first thought was also Ironweed, but the leaves look different. Both Ironweed and Joe Pye Weed have thinner leaves from my experience. The calyx also seems to be different. I will check the stem to see if it is hollow or not next time I go out there. More info seems to be in order.

#10 I am not sure that the leaves have the coarse teeth along the leaf margins like Late Boneset does. Maybe could be Tall Boneset, Eupatorium altissimum? I need to get another pic to see how many prominent veins there are along the length of the blades. 3 would be tall, while 1 would be late.

I think we've got the others licked. 
wild-potato-vine-copy.jpg
[Thumbnail for wild-potato-vine-copy.jpg]
 
Hester Winterbourne
Posts: 219
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b)
16
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would still take some convincing that #9 is not some sort of knapweed, whatever the leaves look like. The scaly bracts behind the flowerhead are so distinctive.
 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 398
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
23
books dog food preservation forest garden goat trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hester Winterbourne wrote:I would still take some convincing that #9 is not some sort of knapweed, whatever the leaves look like. The scaly bracts behind the flowerhead are so distinctive.


I'm still not sure. Notice the similar leaf type on #9 and #10. Both Joe pye weed and boneset are Eupatorium species, and those leaves are so similar that I can't help thinking they are in the same genus. Plus, if you look closely at Joe pye weed, the bracts are very much like knapweed, so they would easily confuse someone. It would be nice if we could get a more distant shot showing the entire plant, as well as a wider angle closeup on the leaves so we can see the tips. That might help solve this particular ID problem.
 
I would challenge you to a battle of wits, but I see you are unarmed - shakespear. Unarmed tiny ad:
Video of all the PDC and ATC (~177 hours) - HD instant view
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/paul-wheaton/digital-market/Video-PDC-ATC-hours-HD
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!