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Cultivation of Commercial Soy  RSS feed

 
Charles Laferriere
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Location: Quebec, Canada - 4b/5a
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What does it imply?

Not in the sense that I'm planning to do that, but a part of the land I'm acquiring was cultivated for soy two years ago.

I'm wondering if someone knows which chemicals are involved in commercial soy cultivation.

Then it'll be the cleanup game.

Mischivious-Charles-with-misleading-title
 
Charles Laferriere
Posts: 103
Location: Quebec, Canada - 4b/5a
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EDIT!! TOPIC SHOULD BE SOYY --- Not SOIL. SOY. Can't edit it now.



Frankly, I'm finding it rather strange that it's hard to find this information? The soy fields are EVERYWHERE where I live.
 
Zach Muller
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I am not a soy farmer, but i did some searching around and found some names. Unfortunately commercial soy can be a very nasty business.


Table 1. Toxicity ot Common Insecticides and Nematicides
Used on Soybeans to Birds, Mammals, and Fish
________________________________________________________

Insecticide (Brand Name) Birds Mammals Fish

acephate (Orthene) M L L
aldicarb (Temik) Hc H EH
Bacillus thuringieinsis NT NT L
carbaryl (Sevin) L L M
chlorpyrffos (Lorsban) H L EH
esfenvalerate (Asana XL) L L EH
ethoprop (Mocap) Hc M H
methomyl (Lannate) H H H
methyl parathon Hc H H
permethrin (Ambush, Pounce) L L EH
thiodicarb (Larvin) H H M
tralomethrin (Scout) L L EH
________________________________________________________
Wildlife hazard is based on the following toxicities:
H(Highly toxic) = LD50 less than 30 mg/kg and/or
LC50 less than 500 ppm.
M(Moderately toxic) = LD50 greater than 30 and less
than 100 mg/kg and/or LC50
greater than 500 and less than
1000 ppm.
L(Low toxicity) = LD50 greater than 100 mg/kg and
LC50 greater than 1000 ppm.
NT(Not toxic)

Fish 96-hour LC50 toxicities are as follows:
EH(Extremely toxic) less than 0.1 ppm
H(Highly toxic) 0.1 to 1.0 ppm
M(Moderately toxic)1 to 10 ppm
L(Low toxicity) greater than 10 ppm.

To convert fish toxicities to pounds of active
ingredient per acre-foot of water, multiply
by 2.7.

c = Active ingredient (not necessarily a specific
product) has caused wildlife deaths.



source
 
Charles Laferriere
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Location: Quebec, Canada - 4b/5a
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Hey Zach,

Thanks for the input.

I'm amazed that information is not more rapidly "out there"? I couldn't find anything regarding the topic on google!!

So, now let's see the real damage.


acephate (Orthene) M L L
Half-life: 3-6 days

aldicarb (Temik) Hc H EH
Half-life: 24 hours
Evaluation: No data were available from studies in humans.

Bacillus thuringieinsis NT NT L

carbaryl (Sevin) L L M
Half-life: few minutes

chlorpyrffos (Lorsban) H L EH
Half-life: 60h

esfenvalerate (Asana XL) L L EH
Half-life: 0.5 day to 1 day

ethoprop (Mocap) Hc M H
Half-life: may range from 3-56 days

methomyl (Lannate) H H H
Half-life: 3-14 days

methyl parathon Hc H H
Half-life: 6.5 to 13 days

permethrin (Ambush, Pounce) L L EH
Half-life: 7 to 9 days

thiodicarb (Larvin) H H M
half-life: up to 78 days in pH5 envr.

tralomethrin (Scout) L L EH
half-life: soil: 64 to 84 days, water 4 to 36 YEARS?!

Source is: https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound

Well, half life varies a lot regarding the environment. But roughly, the only two that can be potentially fucking up soil for the long run is LARVIN and SCOUT.

More coming sooon...

Sherlock-Charles-Holmes
 
Charles Laferriere
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Location: Quebec, Canada - 4b/5a
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Tralomethrin - SCOUT

Environmental Fate/Exposure Summary
Tralomethrin's production and use as an insecticide is expected to result in its release to the environment. If released to air, a vapor pressure of 3.6X10-11 mm Hg at 25 deg C indicates tralomethrin will exist solely in the particulate phase in the ambient atmosphere. Particulate-phase tralomethrin will be removed from the atmosphere by wet and dry deposition. If released to soil, tralomethrin is expected to have no mobility based upon a Koc range of 43,796 to 675,667. Volatilization from moist soil surfaces is not expected to be an important fate process based upon an estimated Henry's Law constant of 3.9X10-10 atm-cu m/mole. Tralomethrin is not expected to volatilize from dry soil surfaces based upon its vapor pressure. Tralomethrin's half-life in soil has been reported to have a range of 64-84 days. If released into water, tralomethrin is expected to adsorb to suspended solids and sediment based upon its Koc. Volatilization from water surfaces is not expected to be an important fate process based upon this compound's estimated Henry's Law constant. An estimated BCF of 250 suggests the potential for bioconcentration in aquatic organisms is high. Base-catalyzed second-order hydrolysis half-lives of 36 and 4 years were estimated for pH values of 7 and 8, respectively. Occupational exposure to tralomethrin may occur through inhalation of dust particles and dermal contact with this compound at workplaces where tralomethrin is produced or used. (SRC)


Thiodicarb - LARVIN

Abiotic Degredation
The rate constant for the vapor-phase reaction of thiodicarb with photochemically-produced hydroxyl radicals has been estimated as 13X10-12 cu cm/molecule-sec at 25 deg C(SRC) using a structure estimation method(1). This corresponds to an atmospheric half-life of about 29 hours at an atmospheric concentration of 5X10+5 hydroxyl radicals per cu cm(1). Thiodicarb undergoes hydrolysis in the environment with half-lives of 78 days, 32 days and 12 hours at pH 5, 7 and 9, respectively(2). Thiodicarb undergoes photolysis in water and on soil, with respective half-lives of 8 days and 37 days(2).

Same source.
 
John Wolfram
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Location: Lafayette, Indiana
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Charles Laferriere wrote:
carbaryl (Sevin) L L M
Half-life: few minutes

This might be a bit off. Most of the articles/spray regimens I have seen for carbaryl put its half life at a couple days.
http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/carbgen.pdf
 
Charles Laferriere
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Location: Quebec, Canada - 4b/5a
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I stand corrected. Thanks John.

Still, a few years after cultivation has stopped, it seems that there are no long term impacts.

And that, my friend, sparks a lot of joy and hope in my heart.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Charles Laferriere wrote:What does it imply?

Not in the sense that I'm planning to do that, but a part of the land I'm acquiring was cultivated for soy two years ago.

I'm wondering if someone knows which chemicals are involved in commercial soy cultivation.

Then it'll be the cleanup game.

Mischivious-Charles-with-misleading-title


Question number one is where on planet earth are you? That has loads to do with what may have been used in soybean production on this land.

Most likely Urea was poured on the soil along with roundup and an insecticide mix. If the farmer used a crop plane, you might be able to find out exactly what was distributed by that manner.
If you have the barns from the previous operation or can get access to those barns, you will find the containers currently being used and they are most likely the exact same ones used on the land in question.
With out knowing the local of this land it would be guess work at the highest level to offer up anything further.
 
Charles Laferriere
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Location: Quebec, Canada - 4b/5a
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Hi Bryant. And thanks for the input.

Im in quebec, canada.

The ex owners of the house were giving away theland to be cultivated, in altrrnance of corn and soyfor seven years. The ex owners never received a penny. Im not too big on small town gossip but it was cultivated by the dairy farmer on the corner and apparently his operations are rather sketchy (under the table as we speak of here) which is highly hypocritical considering that dairy is largely govt subsidised. Anyway i shouldn't judge as i dont know the whole story...
But regarding the land andproducts used ill keep posted and try to get back asap.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Then you could possibly go for a visit and ask for a tour of his operation, which would allow you to observe what containers happen to be laying about.
Best case, he would tell you through answering your questions, normally I don't find such cooperation out in the field, but that's here in the USA.
Either method would give you at least clues as to what has been used over those years.
That will help you in determining the right remediation steps to take.

We have helped a few new "organic" farms here, by telling the previous users of the land that we are setting up the land for organic farming and need to know what materials were used and for how long so we can remediate the land for certification.
Usually when we take the new farmer along, we are afforded some truths which are very helpful in developing the plan of remediation.
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