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Troy-Bilt Tomahawk Wood Chipper/Shredder model 47285 -- anybody have an operating manual?

 
gardener
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Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
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Garage sales pay off if you go to enough of them. Here's today's treasure:



It's an 8hp Garden Way Troy-Bilt Tomahawk chipper/shredder from about 20 years ago, 1997 list price $1,249 dollars. I bought it off a nice old man of about 80 who was holding a "living estate sale". His claim is that it was only ever used one time. I paid: $145. Condition appears very good, no visible wear on any parts, 8hp Briggs and Stratten 4-cycle motor has oil and turns easily by hand without vibration. Haven't been able to fuel it or start it up yet because of weather and prior commitments today that have kept me from playing with it. I think I got a great deal even if I have to tinker with the motor; if it starts, runs, and chips, I got a spectacular deal.

But I'm not posting here to gloat about a fine day out bargain hunting. I want to beg for a copy of the operating manual for the model #47285 if anybody has one. I've checked all the usual internet suspects and nobody has the manual for this model, although there's a manual for a very similar earlier model here that tells me much of what I want to know. But still, if anybody has a manual in electronic format, I'd love to get a copy. And if you've got a paper manual, I'd be happy to pay postage both ways so I can scan it and put a copy up on the web.

I have lots of wood chips from off the property (thank you Davey Tree!) but I'm also clearing a ton of brush and saplings and I already have plenty of brush piles. So my specific application is to turn brush from my food forest area into mulch that will be left in place to suppress weeds and grasses, improve soil, and hold moisture.

Nonetheless I am aware that the downsides (from a permaculture perspective) of running a gasoline wood chipper are not inconsiderable. They include:

1 - noise and pollution from burning fossil fuels
2 - consumer-grade chippers tend to be slow and labor intensive
3 - there may be better uses for the whole wood (brush piles, hugels, mushrooms)

However I don't have the machinery I would need to bury hugel-wood in the amounts I'm generating, it's a lot of work moving brush from where I'm cutting it to where I have room for brush piles, and it's a lot more efficient to generate mulch where I need it (in the areas I'm clearing) than it is to haul it by hand across the property. My bottom line is that the machine was a bargain and I believe it will help me get where I want to go faster than I could get there without the machine.

But I could sure use a manual. Post here or PM me if you can help out with that. Thanks!
 
steward
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Not an Operators Manual,. but here is an online parts catalog:
47285 Parts Manual

They do have exploded views of most components.
 
pollinator
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SCORE!!!

There are only a few things to worry about on those:

Carb. It is a BS engine and you need to keep the carb from gumming up.
Bearings. Grease gun if they are greasable, check them if they aren't.
Knives. Keep them/it sharp. The mounting bolts will freeze up and make it very hard to change the blades. I am learning that one the hard way. Mine need sharpening and can't get them out right now.
Belt. Keep it tight.

You will love the shredder even more than the chipper! Weeds, brush, leaves, you name it, it goes through the shredder to make compost 10x faster than before.

 
Dan Boone
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John Polk wrote:Not an Operators Manual,. but here is an online parts catalog:
47285 Parts Manual

They do have exploded views of most components.


I did find that, but forgot to link it here. It helps! But I really want to get my hands on the operating manual; one of the things that should be in it is the incredibly tricky procedure for rotating the cutting flail knives, which are supposed to have four different cutting edges (corners) that you can rotate between before the knives become completely worn out.

R Scott wrote:
Carb. It is a BS engine and you need to keep the carb from gumming up.



We used the little Briggs & Stratton engines for a ton of purposes when I was growing up, including rototillers, water pumps, and suction dredges for placer gold mining. I've got a lot of familiarity with them and so I'm not worried about managing their quirks.

R Scott wrote:
Bearings. Grease gun if they are greasable, check them if they aren't.



Another reason I want the owners manual, for the precise recommendations re: lube. But I can manage without of course.

R Scott wrote:
Knives. Keep them/it sharp. The mounting bolts will freeze up and make it very hard to change the blades. I am learning that one the hard way. Mine need sharpening and can't get them out right now.



As mentioned above, with a ton of disassembly work one is supposed to be able to rotate the knives. Not looking forward to that task, though.

R Scott wrote:
Belt. Keep it tight.



That one is actually funny. Internet commentary seems about evenly divided between "this thing eats belts" complainers who don't mention paying attention to belt tension, and "belts last forever if you get them adjusted right" people. Obviously I shall strive to be among the latter.

 
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Location: Northeast Oklahoma, Formerly Zone 6b, Now Officially Zone 7
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Go to source for manuals for almost anything, ManualOwl. Check the model number... Troybilt manual
Make sure your firewall and AV are on and up to date, went for one manual and the bells and siren went off on mine, no harm but got my attention. Hasn't happened since.
 
Dan Boone
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Eric, no joy for me at that link, but thanks for cluing me in to that site anyway!

Limited tinkering time today and I am going very slow, looking for gotchas and checking everything I can think of that might need to be tended to on a machine that's been sitting for so long. Good thing, too! When I popped the shroud off the air filter, I found that over the years the mud dauber wasps had colonized the heck out of it:



Starting at the Briggs and Stratton page, I got a part number for the filter, worked some internet part number interchange sites, and eventually came up with a NAPA auto part number. Called the three NAPAs closest to me and struck pay dirt on the third one, about 16 miles away. Zipped over there before they closed for the day and got back just before dusk. Didn't have time to drain and replace the ancient motor oil, but I just *had* to try starting it up. Put fuel in, pulled the cord, got a pop on the second pull, choked it on the third pull, sputtered on the fourth, turned the choke back off and it fired right up on the fifth pull. Turned it off instantly (because I didn't do the oil yet) and checked again in five minutes; it started on the first pull that time. I was feeling pretty happy about my purchase by then!

Tomorrow I have to check for fuel leaks (high probability of dried out, deteriorated, or leaky gaskets in the fuel and carb systems), drain whatever old oil remains, and put nice clean oil in. Then I should be ready to chip!

 
Dan Boone
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Making progress. Small hitches. Got the oil changed. Filled with fuel. Discovered that plastic fuel tank is made from two halves with a bonded seam, which has split and now leaks. I'm pretty sure I can find an adhesive that will re-bond that seam.

Was aware that this unit was missing its "optional" discharge screen (a piece of curved spring steel with holes, available in various sizes). Some sorts of material are said to chip OK without a discharge screen, the function of which is to hold the wood in the shredding chamber until it is sufficiently reduced to fit through the screen. Howevever, several runs of my test material today (flexible green brushy saplings) proved that my stuff tends to get frayed and ejected as large/long shreds and twigs, up to 24" long. I will want a discharge screen. This is going to be a challenge.

First step: Find the right parts catalog. This turns out to be the right one for the 47285. From it, I learn that this is the "Non I/C Standard" model, which means it's the model that doesn't have the "Industrial/Commercial grade" Briggs and Stratton engine. It's also known (this we learn from the link John Polk provided) as the "Tomahawk VI", which is a designation that matters on some parts lists and interchange diagrams.

Second step: Identify the right model numbers. These turn out to be:

1900321 (standard 3/4" holes discharge screen)
11531k (optional 3/8" holes discharge screen)
11532k (optional 1" holes discharge screen)
11573k (optional 1.75" holes discharge screen)
11575k (optional horizontal bar grate for shredding)

Third step: find any of these parts. So far, searched ebay (no current listings, one just sold two days ago, I have set alerts on all these part nos) and amazon (no hits). General internet searches turns up only industrial keyword spam sites and a couple of legit catalogs with "unavailable" or "out of stock" designations on all these part numbers.

Looks like ebay is going to be my best bet. Now for some patience, until I get hits on my alerts...
 
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Dan,

Did you ever find the Operator's Manual?  I have it.  I also have a solution for the belt problem of wearing out.

Russ
 
Russ Herring
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Some info on the Tomahawk chipper.  I have had one since 1995.  I now have 3 of them.   There are 16 free-rotating flails mounted on 4 bars.  Each flail has 4 cutting edges (one on each corner).  When flails wear down, they get smooth.  You can reach down into the hopper and feel them.  These flails can be rotated to expose a new cutting edge.  To do this, a roll pin on each of the 4 bars that the flails mount on must be driven out.  The bar can then be driven out from the engine side and flails rotated or replaced.  Brent Chalmers sells them on ebay.  The chipper knife can also be replaced or sharpened.  The chipper chute must be removed for that.  The location of the flails and spacers must be duplicated especially near the chipper blade.

The belt wears out quickly for two reasons.  First, the idler arrangement and the fact that the belt must act as the clutch stinks.  As does the belt as it screeches during startup.  This removes rubber, makes the belt loose, and eventually shreds the belt.  The second reason is that the idler pushed on the back of the belt.  These belt are not designed for that.  It bends two directions on every revolution.  That makes it hot and heat wears out belts.

I fixed both problems.  I removed the engine pulley and replaced it with a v-belt centrifugal clutch.  I replaced the idler with a v-belt idler that pulls on the belt.  I attached a spring to the idler handle to provide pulling force against the idler which tightens the belt just like on a car engine.  The result is that the belt is not the clutch anymore.  When the engine is started, it has no load on it until it reaches 1800 RPM at which point the centrifugal clutch begins to engage.  This spins up the shredder cage smoothly.  No belt slippage.  When you turn off the engine, the whole assembly spins down to 1800 RPM where the clutch disengages and the engine stops while the cage spins freely down to stop.  Works great.

Russ
 
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Dan-great find! I have a super tomahawk that I bought new a few decades ago and carted all over the country with me, love the machine.  Years ago I bought a grinding wheel that is good for sharpening carbide, it allows me to sharpen the blades fast and easily, just need a square edge on the flails.  You can turn each flail 3 times to use each of the cutting edges, I do a lot of reprocessing free tree mulch and get stones a lot, which quickly dulls the cutting surface, sometimes also dulls the cutting surfaces not in use.  I have some flails that are original and thru sharpening, look quite different from the new ones, not bad for 30 yrs of use.  I bought a complete set of replacement flails years ago when Troy built laughed at me for using an antique!  You can still find them for around $2-$3 per flail online.  It takes me less than an hour to change out the flails, I tie up the discharge chute lid so it is easy to reach the cage, and use a punch, to remove the pin holding the shaft in place.  You have to rotate the cage to slide the shaft out the access hole in the side.  I do one shaft at a time to keep track of alignment of spacers and flail position, I also dont drive the pin all the way in so it's easier to get out the next time.  It's a bitch to hold the cage steady and drive the pin out with hammer and punch when the cage wants to rotate, a piece of wood jammed in the hopper helps with this.  

I have replaced the Phillips flathead screws holding the cutting bar in place a few times with Allen type flathead screws so you can use a socket wrench with extension to get them out easier, works well.  I use a small awl to clean out the Allen recess of woody debris first.  

I have processed 2 1/2" - 3" limbs, fresher ones are easier than old dried out ones, but you might want to wear gloves and hang on tight as the chipper will vibrate the heck out of your hands while you push the limb into the shoot.  

I removed the rubber protective gadget on the hopper many years ago to make it easier to load leaves and coarse wood chips, i would be careful as the chipper literally rips material out of your hands into the hopper.

I bought 3 screens and a mesh bag as accessories with my super tomahawk, I use the smallest screen for dried leaves, the medium screen for all around chipping and shredding, and the large opening screen for course woodchips.  I used the bag once, a waste of time unless you just process a bushel of material, I find the machine too heavy to move around for just a little stuff, so I gather loads of debris or 4-6 yds of rough wood chips and process all at once.

I replied to a post on permies some time ago about someone wanting to process wet or green garden waste, I found a manual online and saw the bar type grate recommended for wetter material.  I tried to find the bar grate, but no luck.  I hate processing wet material, I found that if you add wet stuff, it just clogs the screen, but if you add a pitchfork of drier stuff right after wet stuff, it works better.  Shredding without a screen is almost pointless since the screen holds the material in the machine till it reaches the size of the screen holes.  Chipping may be ok with no screen since the knife has already it up the material.

I always use a screen, even when chipping.  Also, I will gather twigs and jamb them all together into the chipping chute, I find it does a better job, doesn't bog down the machine, doesn't rip the material from your hands (a little scary), and you don't get as much blow back out the main hopper (more of a problem for me since I removed the safety gadget)

Glad to hear of the mod referenced above to help save on belt life!  I found a dozen belts on eBay some years ago when I couldn't find the originals anymore.  Not sure if the original ones were made differently to allow pressure on both sides,  but they certainly last longer than ones not made for the Troy built.
Hope you enjoy it
Kevin
 
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Russ Herring wrote:
I fixed both problems.  I removed the engine pulley and replaced it with a v-belt centrifugal clutch.  I replaced the idler with a v-belt idler that pulls on the belt.  I attached a spring to the idler handle to provide pulling force against the idler which tightens the belt just like on a car engine.  The result is that the belt is not the clutch anymore.  When the engine is started, it has no load on it until it reaches 1800 RPM at which point the centrifugal clutch begins to engage.  This spins up the shredder cage smoothly.  No belt slippage.  When you turn off the engine, the whole assembly spins down to 1800 RPM where the clutch disengages and the engine stops while the cage spins freely down to stop.  Works great.



Russ - do you have any pics of your idler conversion? I love this idea. I just bought me one of these chippers (only have the 3/8 screen which I found clogs really fast trying to shred leaves/twiggy stuff).  My chipper  blades have been sharpened but I'll check on the flails.  I was initially thinking about drilling out my 3/8" screen to larger holes. I'm not sure if I'll ever need a 3/8" screen but man - screens are running $150-$200 on ebay right now and I paid $350 for the chipper.
 
Nathan Stewart
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Looks like I'll be doing the clutch mod - broke a belt with about 4hrs run time.

Also, for anyone thinking about modding screens - the steel is way harder than I expected it needs to be. (In fact, for a containment grate I would have expected a very mild steel to absorb energy.) The screen I had scoffed at any drilling attempts.  A plasma cutter might work, but I'll just keep the 3/8 screen for leaves (higher reduction) and fab up a rebar grate for wet/rough much.
 
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http://www.brentchalmers.com/Manuals/472655-447267and47276_OwnersManual.pdf
 
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I used to have a shredder by "Bush Hog" company It didn't require any manual to operate.
 
Posts: 469
Location: St. George, UT. Zone 8a Dry/arid. 8" of rain in a good year.
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Oh fun, I got me a 47285 just a couple of weeks ago off craigslist for $225 (down from asking price of $250).

Of course I googled the model, and no surprise the firs thing that came up was this thread on permies!  Awesome.

Really cool old local gardener, told me he was the second owner.  Said it just needed a spark plug/tune up, a new belt, and an oil change.  It looked to be in great condition, so I got it.

I got it home and started inspecting it.  The air filter was in pretty bad shape so I searched all around town for a replacement air filter but couldn't find one anywhere.  Eventually went to a specialty store and they ordered me one for $25, which is ridiculous for a tiny air filter in my opinion, but it is an original Briggs and Stratton filter.

Also went to Napa, and a couple of other parts stores looking for a belt.  I knew it was a special belt due to it acting as the clutch as well as a regular belt but the sales people couldn't find what I needed.
Finally found and ordered it from the last parts store I went to.  It was $16.

After I replaced the spark plug, got the new belt on, and replaced the oil, I gave the carb a shot of starting fluid and gave a couple of pulls.  It fired right up, and died.  After a couple of times of this, I kept spraying a bit of starting fluid into the carb to keep it running, and then the bowl to the carb starting leaking like crazy.

So then I went on Amazon and saw that new carbs are cheap, so I bought a new carb for $16.  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082V26TSN/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

So today I installed the new carb, and got it running pretty good.  I'm not sure if it's running great (holy SH!T it's loud!), but it's running enough to shred a 1" fresh branch I cut to test it.  I think I'll need to flip the blades or sharpen them because I had to push on the branch pretty good to get it to feed into the hopper thing.  

Anyway, thanks for the thread and the information in it.  I was actually able to use the links in this thread to cross reference the belt I got, and some other useful information.  Just contributing what I can.

IMG_20201230_153055444.jpg
Model 47285 8hp Briggs and Stratton
Model 47285 8hp Briggs and Stratton
IMG_20201230_154842592.jpg
Model number.
Model number.
IMG_20201230_134946683.jpg
New air filter vs. old.
New air filter vs. old.
IMG_20201230_134932051.jpg
New vs. old air filter.
New vs. old air filter.
IMG_20201230_134852931.jpg
Air filter number.
Air filter number.
IMG_20201230_134839245.jpg
New generic carb.
New generic carb.
IMG_20201230_154738128.jpg
New belt I used.
New belt I used.
IMG_20201230_154718999.jpg
Mulch from fresh 1" fruitless mulberry branch.
Mulch from fresh 1" fruitless mulberry branch.
 
Joshua Bertram
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Okay, so I dug a little deeper into the machine today.  I pretty much knew the main blade needed to be sharpened.  For one, it was hard to push a 1" freshly cut branch through it.  The other thing that had me a little worried was that the chipper seemed more like a shredder.  I'm sure nesting birds would really appreciate the pasta like long fibers of wood, but from what I've seen, actual chips seem to be what comes out of other machines.

So I figured I'd sharpen the main blade today, and then it would be fine.  No.  The main blade is a wreck.  It's been rounded to the point where I'm just going to toss it in the garbage.  I took some pictures of it on a flat surface, and the middle has about an 1/8" depression in it, and is very badly rounded.  The 8hp engine has probably been worked a lot harder than it should have been for quite a while.  I found a blade on Amazon that I hope will fit it.  It's another $40 bucks into the nickel and dime game, but hopefully the blade works and that's the last purchase I'll have to make for a while.  Here's the blade I just ordered.  It's supposed to get here before the end of the month.  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00V7NRZ48/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1  The dimensions seem to be exactly the same as my existing blade.

Then I figured I'd inspect the flails.  In all honesty I didn't know what a flail was until today.  Yeah, those were all rounded off too, but thankfully the other three cutting edges were still good on them.  
Oh my gosh, what a pain in the ass to flip them around.  I had to contort my arms in all kinds of strange ways to get the bits back together right.  I took pictures of each of the "axles" or whatever as I went.  I could see getting really confused about how they would go back together if one didn't do that.  

IMG_20210101_120624336.jpg
Back side of main blade on a piece of flat steel. It's supposed to be flat.
Back side of main blade on a piece of flat steel. It's supposed to be flat.
IMG_20210101_120744574.jpg
Front of the same blade. There should be no light coming through where the blade rests on the steel.
Front of the same blade. There should be no light coming through where the blade rests on the steel.
IMG_20210101_161746618.jpg
Flails on the axle shaft before being flipped around.
Flails on the axle shaft before being flipped around.
IMG_20210101_155840679.jpg
All of the flails were rounded like this.
All of the flails were rounded like this.
IMG_20210101_155922824.jpg
Thankfully the flails have four cutting sides to them, and my set still has three good sides.
Thankfully the flails have four cutting sides to them, and my set still has three good sides.
 
Nathan Stewart
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My Briggs was barely running - I swapped the carb/plug/air filter and it would cough along for 10-15 seconds. Compression was down around 60 so I swapped the engine with a Harbor Freight 8hp Predator. If you do this, the Predator engine is a 1" shaft (there's a 6.5hp engine for a lot less with a 3/4" shaft,  but IMO the 8hp option is what separates this machine from the toys currently available under about $2k).  The Predator shaft is about 3/4" longer, the bolt holes line up with the Briggs, but you'll need about 1/2" of spacer to keep the tensioner bracket bolt from keeping the engine from mounting flush.  Fired up and works like a champ.

I did look into the Centrifugal Clutch, but for this class engine it's about $70-100, and I'd just spent $300 on the engine. My plan is to see how it is on belts - if I'm going through more than a belt a season I'll replace the pulley with a clutch. For anyone looking the closest thing I've been able to find so far appears to be Hilliard (LD4P-60), which is a 1" shaft, 3.7"OD v-belt pulley clutch rated for up to 13hp. I found it for about $75 at https://www.mfgsupply.com/h1p37.html.

Unfortunately, I only have the fine mulcher grate, and they're right pricey. I've thought about welding up a grate from rebar to give something like 1/2-1" holes for general mulching. I'd consider boring these out but it seems to be hardened. I suppose I could still take my neighbor's plasma cutter and just connect the dots to make a bigger mesh.
 
Nathan Stewart
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Predator Mount
IMG_20210304_163211189.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20210304_163211189.jpg]
 
Nathan Stewart
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The thing is a beast. We were feeding rotted 6" LOGS ito the shredder with the grate off and it was just churning out pulp.  A few cedar knots weren't decomposed enough to shred, and it'd kick the belt out of toggle. The belt adjustment on mine is really tempermental. I finally got the adjustment unstuck but it's prone to vibrating out of engagement unless the spring is backed all the way out.

Also - my drive and drum pulleys are aligned but the tensioner pulley isn't - it's on the pulley but almost at the edge. I ordered that centrifugal clutch after the amount of belt wear we observed after just an hour of operation. I'm sure it's wearing faster because it keeps popping out - and every engagement/disengatgement adds to the wear. When it comes in I'll try to get the idler pulley lined up better too.
 
Nathan Stewart
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Aaagggh. Does anyone have an unexploded photograph view of the belt tension lever assembly? The diagrams are a bit too exploded, hard to see which bolts And spacers go where in the levers.
 
Nathan Stewart
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Got it back together. My tension lever was popping out at the slightest vibration. I had to run it almost all the way out, then back the locknut out to compress the spring more. The same screw controls both travel and load. I don't think I would have figured it out if had hadn't removed the engine mount.

Also sharpened the blade, (had been done incorrectly long ago and was now duller than a butter knife) and flipped the flails (never been done. Some were so worn you couldn't make out the original shape). Way better. The tensioner popping up randomly was beyond annoying and probably not helping belt life.
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My lever is also not staying engaged.  Do you have a picture of where the nylon lock nut is supposed to be?  
 
Nathan Stewart
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I don't have a picture of where it's supposed to be, but the length of the rod threaded into the round end stop sets the travel, and the lock nut position sets the spring pressure.

My idler is touching the drive pulley. Don't know if that's ok, but the belt can still be pulled by hand so I don't think it's hurting the belt. That ensures the lever goes through toggle and the spring is holding it closed instead of making it pop out. Then, to get more spring pressure, back the lock nut out towards the handle to load the spring more without changing pulley engagement.

This is a difficult with the lever assembled, and easiest if you remove the engine mount from the chipper. I had to back the screw all the way out from the end stop to set the lock nut. There just isn't a lot of room to get a wrench in there  behind the idler.

My centrifugal clutch arrives today. Sure hope it means  less belt fiddling.
 
Nathan Stewart
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Clutch has no set screws, and requires a washer/bolt to  retain it. I guess that means it's free to float into alignment with the belt before it rusts into place (locktite orange).

As I mentioned the pulley is 3.7" instead of 4". I had to adjust the tensioner quite a bit. It could probably do with a 1" shorter belt (0.3 x π).  Short answer is it seems to work. I do think retaining the lever is a good idea, because if you jam the barrel it can smoke a belt in a hurry.

Overall, I think it's an improvement. I'll have to think about the pull idler mod, but it's doubtful I'll do anything unless I still think it's eating belts.
 
Nathan Stewart
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Im going to try a collar on the shaft to hold the clutch in alignment, but I'm not sure the clutch is a great idea. It gets really hot. I think it's a fine idea at startup, but if the shredder bogs down it slips. I think it's better to just let it kick the belt out of toggle (assuming that was a design feature and not just a maladjustment of my tension lever)

I didn't swap the belt tensioner to pull instead of push, but that's probably a good idea ( but I think it requires a v pulley instead of the stock idler)

We got about 10 hrs on the first blade sharpening. I was hoping the flails would get me 30 years per corner, but they're already showing signs of wear.  
 
Joshua Bertram
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Location: St. George, UT. Zone 8a Dry/arid. 8" of rain in a good year.
134
trees bike greening the desert
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So I finally pruned most of my urban yard last week and had a large pile of branches to chip in the wood chipper.
Fired it up for the first time since I last posted and it ran great.  It sucked the wood in with the new blade and made really clean cuts.  The largest branches (less than 3", but more than 2") it ate with ease, but I did have to control the rate of feed so as not to stall the motor out.  I did stall it out a few times, but it was from putting too much thick debris in the top.  
The belt held up great for about one and a half hours of constant running.
Very happy with the machine overall, the only thing I'm disappointed in is how small the pile of chips is.  
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Mainly mulberry, desert willow, and ash branches.
Mainly mulberry, desert willow, and ash branches.
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In about an hour and a half it turned it all into a small pile of chips.
In about an hour and a half it turned it all into a small pile of chips.
 
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Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
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This thread has been one of the most helpful in getting my Tomahawk running smoothly. The issue I had the most difficulty with was the proper adjustment for the clutch. The tension screw needs to be 3/4 to 3/16 exposed when the lever is engaged, that setting along with a kevlar reinforced belt and a couple of other adjustments and I have been chipping, chipping, chipping. So far I've gotten about 10 yards of chips without a belt failure. I made a video on what I did as it's kind of hard to explain without visuals - YouTube
 
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I stumbled onto this thread last week and have learned a few things.   Thanks to all who contributed.  My 47254 had been out of service for a 5 or 6 years due to a carb issue.  This weekend I replaced the carburetor with one purchased on Amazon. The carb kit came with a new air filter, so I changed that, then cleaned the plug and changed the oil. It fired right up on one pull.  I produced a bushel of wood chips in a few minutes. I'll need to sharpen the blade.  The flails look fine.      If anyone is still looking for a manual  this might be what you need.  http://www.brentchalmers.com/Manuals/1989Troy-BiltTomahawkChipperShredderOwnerOperatorManual.pdf
It may not be the same year, but it is most definitely the right machine.  Jim P
 
Nathan Stewart
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This thread is the sole reason I have an account on the forum. It's been the single most helpful resource on internet for getting this thing running.

Serrated nuts may be a great idea for a chainsaw bar (wish Stihl used them), but so far I've had all four bolts mounting the engine bracket to the chipper and one of the tensioner arm bolts walk off in about 20 hours of running. I replaced the engine bracket bolts with nylon locknuts. I'll have to do the same for the tensioner bracket, butbfor now it's got some clear nail polish thread locker.
 
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Hey, I have my original manual from when I bought my own way back then. It is in excellent condition,  so I could copy it all for you!  Let me know! Thanks, Bob
 
James Pasquill
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If the manual is for the model year we have been discussing here, 47254, 47255, I'd like a copy.  I think I have all the info I need from a a manual for an older version, but it would still be good to have the right manual.      

I assume you have all found this, but just in case, the company that bought Troy Bilt has some parts available, including belts.  http://www.chalmersindustries.com/ChipperParts-s/143.htm

Also, Rustoleum makes a Troy Bilt Red spray paint.  https://www.lowes.com/pd/Rust-Oleum-Gloss-Troy-Built-Red-Spray-Paint-Actual-Net-Contents-12-oz/999977810 Now that I have my machine running well again, I will touch up the paint, remove the rust, and hope for another 10 years or so.   Jim
 
James Pasquill
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BTW, the Gates 6929 belt is available at chain auto parts store like O'Reilly. They are about $10 more than ebay or Amazon, but if you need one in pinch, they are in stock at least in stores in my area.

Has anyone found a cover that fits this machine?  All I can find are too short.  I want to upgrade from a plastic tire bag.
 
Nathan Stewart
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No. I bought a tarp. The intent was to cut it to fit, but I haven't done that yet. Harbor freight's camo tarps are polyethylene which doesn't glue. The vinyl ones are more durable and can be glued. My plan is to just cut it and put grommets in to hold and then see if I can use an iron to melt the seams, but mostly for looking nicer/durability - as long as there are no seams on top it should keep water out. I like camo tarps for outdoor equipment. It's not invisible of course, but it stands out less than a giant red machine I left in the woods on the edge of my property. If you don't care about that then get the heavy duty silver vinyl ones and cut/glue to your heart's content.

I keep a cedar stick that was too tough for the chipper and lay it across the top, running through the handle of the pusher block so that it has a peak to shed water rather than collect in the chute.
 
James Pasquill
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Thanks for the idea on cutting up a tarp to fit. I've just wrapped it in tarps and shock cord in the past, which often blow off, and that has contributed to the rusting.


Another question, what are you all using for lube on the bearings and shredder mechanism?  The manuals I have seen don't mention that as part of general maintenance. It seems to me that a machine that is 30 years old and often left exposed to the elements, ought to be lubed.  
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