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My stumps are erupting!

 
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Location: Fennville MI
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The past week or so, many of the stumps in my back yard, from trees taken down in May2012, have been exploding with mushroom flushes.
Here are some pictures and I have no clue what varieties these might be.

image.jpeg
[Thumbnail for image.jpeg]
mushroms
image.jpeg
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and more
image.jpeg
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and a different stump.
 
Peter Ellis
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Location: Fennville MI
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oops! duplicate pic.
Here is another view.
image.jpeg
[Thumbnail for image.jpeg]
should have been second pic above
 
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Cool. Looks like at least 3 species on the same stump. You might check the yellow one for sulfur tuft Hypholoma fasciculare. The others I have no idea.
John S
PDX OR
 
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The previous post was almost certainly right about the small ones being sulphur tufts (inedible). I would disagree that there are 3 distinct varieties of mushrooms however.
The second to last photo is most definitely (100%) two clumps of Honey Mushrooms (Armillaria genus). One of them is totally rotten.

The larger shrooms at the base of the tree next to the sulphur tufts appear to be very large weathered Honey mushrooms as well (this part I'm 95% sure).
Honey Mushrooms are edible but the taste varies (mediocre to really good) depending on what type of tree it is parasitizing.
The stems are tough and peel like string cheese. Often people will only harvest the caps. This is a good mushroom for beginners who have done a little homework (reading field guides).

A note to novice Mushroom hunters: please send us a photo of: a) the gills up close and b) the stem, above view isn't enough.

David Aurora is the Bees Knees for the record and one of my heroes. His books are worth their weight in Gold.
 
Peter Ellis
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As it turned out, the button types in the photos opened up over a few days into even bigger "shelves",identical to the others.
Assuming they flush again while we ate at this house, I will have to go through a thorough identification. If those are indeed an edible variety, we missed a couple of pounds, easily...
 
Jed Vraiefaux
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Upon closer examination, the smaller ones have too thick of stems to be sulfur tufts. It would seem that they are all honey mushrooms.
This experience has 3 lessons built into it:
a) The power of suggestion: The previous post said sulfur tuft, so that's what I saw (I might have concluded that anyways to be fair, honey mushrooms are strikingly similar from above when young). Group think is particularly dangerous in politics and mushroom hunting
b) The need for up close stem and gill photos. Spore print photos are nice also. Spore prints ARE A MUST for your own purposes if you plan on eating anything and are going the self-taught route
c) Mushroom collecting requires extra patience. I am fully self-taught from books (no mentors or classes). A good rule is to FULLY 100% ID a mushroom and then wait until the next season before attempting to eat it (at which point you FULLY 100% ID it again)

PS If you are Midwest/East Coast I highly recommend Gary Lincoff's Books
 
Peter Ellis
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I appreciate the advice and recommendation. No need to worry, I am mushroom paranoid, no chance of trying anything without a solid and confirmed id.
My base assumption is any wild mushroom is deadly.
 
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