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Natural Building in Ohio  RSS feed

 
Bethani Wilson
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Hi all! I am very very interested in building a natural home, and have been researching specifically cob and straw bale houses for 2years now. I'm curious if anyone here knows of any natural homes in Ohio? And curious what anyone would recommend building in ohio? Also do you know what is in line for building permits, codes, zoning etc in Ohio? Curious the cost of building a cob or straw bale all together, and the cost of getting plumbing and electricity! Sorry for a MILLION questions! THANK YOU!!! -Bethani
 
Bethani Wilson
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Thank you so so much Mike!! You are extremely helpful!!!
 
R Nichols
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I recall seeing one in Burton Ohio too... I may be able to find a link if you want and that is close to you?
 
Bethani Wilson
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We are in Toledo Ohio area.

Also which natural building method do people recommend?
-which method is fastest?
-which is the strongest / most durable?
-which method is least likely to freak out buiding inspectors etc?
 
R Nichols
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Bethani Wilson wrote:We are in Toledo Ohio area.

Also which natural building method do people recommend?
-which method is fastest?
-which is the strongest / most durable?
-which method is least likely to freak out buiding inspectors etc?


A lot depends on your building type/style, weather conditions, how cheaply you want to build it AND materials available. Most cob type structures can be made water proofed and strong enough to last hundreds of years under maintained conditions.
 
Terry Ruth
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Bethani Wilson wrote:We are in Toledo Ohio area.

Also which natural building method do people recommend?
-which method is fastest?
-which is the strongest / most durable?
-which method is least likely to freak out buiding inspectors etc?


The place to start if in a building code enforcement area is with the local BSO(Building & Safety Office) for the latest code since they can change at any time. We can go round and round to answer your questions but if they won't allow it what good is it. Strawbale has been recently added to 2015 IRC in the appendix so you have what is called a "prescriptive path" to comply not needing a Pro Engineer to stamp drawing's If they have adopted it, if so that is the least resistant path. Much of NM, AZ, CA has "Earth Construction" codes, again, If your BSO will adopt. All those methods if followed and inspected by experienced people can yield a good design_build depending on local sourcing and skill level of the trades to perform the work.

The state of OH has adopted 2009 but that can change this year depending on what your local jurisdiction has adopted in part, full, or not at all so check. There are no earth construction codes in it. Looks like OH has also adopted an energy code (IECC) a designer needs to be potentially aware of as well.

https://law.resource.org/pub/us/code/safety.html

If code does not allow any of your preferred methods you have to hire a licensed pro engineer (PE) perhaps and Architect, most BSO's allow that. The next hurdle will be getting past any restrictive covenants.
 
Dale Hodgins
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A timber frame or post and beam frame, with straw bale infill is something that most people will recognize as a house. Using one of these, will alleviate many concerns that the building department may have. Once they are satisfied that it won't fall down, issues such as how to attach and preserve the bales can be dealt with.

Cob walls without insulation, are suited to warmer climates than are found in Ohio.
 
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