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Lettuce and Greens

 
                                    
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Anyone have any tips on growing lettuce and greens in the winter?  Wondering if this is something I could grow inside?  I have plenty of big windows and a woodstove. 
 
Brenda Groth
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Location: North Central Michigan
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i have a tiny greenhouse that is just packed to the brim with lettuces and greens right now..i have a path down the center of the 6x8 greenhouse of bricks and it sits on the pex we have buried for our woodstove..one side of the greenhouse is devoted to mesclun and mixed leaf lettuces and greens for salads, one corner is spinach, the end is swiss chard and a few carrots and the other corner is radishes and broccoli, the other entire side is sugar snap peas, mustards, Kohlrabi and some other greens and a few more radishes and one struggling rosemary that didn't like being moved...enough greens for the two of us for salads or greens every day with the cut and come again type of harvesting.
 
jacque greenleaf
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Location: Burton, WA (USDA zone 8, Sunset zone 5) - old hippie heaven
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Last winter, I grew lettuce indoors under shoplights. Once the plants got going, we had all the lettuce the two of us could eat.

If it's warm enough for you, it's warm enough for lettuce. Even if your house goes below freezing at night and the lettuce is limp in the morning, it will recover in time for dinner. I am not sure though that window light will be sufficient. I used two shoplights, each with one cool white and one warm white tube, and grew eight lettuce plants in an Earthbox. This winter, I'm going for two Earthboxes, so I can try some radishes and green onions.
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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Location: Oakland, CA
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Fava bean sprouts are enormous compared to other sorts of sprout, are cold-tolerant, and are a fairly mild sort of greens. Like all sprouts, they don't require much light; growing "micro greens" (more like meso greens, in this case) might require more light, but I think the window might be enough.
 
                                    
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Oooh, the greenhouse sounds great.  I hope to have one someday.  This year I put in raised beds and they are much easier.  I am filling them with organic manure now. 

I will have to try growing some stuff inside this year and see what works.

I have done some sprouting before.  It is great nutrition in the winter when everything else is lacking.

Thanks!
 
Brenda Groth
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Location: North Central Michigan
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pop some plastic frames over the raised beds (hoops and plastic sheets, hoops can be made of nearly anything, strong wire, tubing, etc)..and you'll have a cold frame, your lettuces should grow a long time i there, just remember to vent it if it gets too hot
 
                                    
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Well I decided to do my lettuce and greens inside.  I got some good seed and soil.  One little seed has already popped up.  I wonder how bright a light bulb I need to keep on them inside?  The natural fertilizers in the soil will be good for a while, then I will have to move on to fish food or something....something less stinky inside would be a plus!
 
Jordan Lowery
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how cold does it get at your place? we grow lettuce just outside and it gets cold rain and snow( only for a few days at a time) and have more than we can eat, it pretty much grows itself with the winter rains and all.
 
Paula Edwards
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Eliot Coleman wrote whole books about that. The four season harvest and I think there is one which is called the winter harvest.
And he is very thorough.
 
Paul Cereghino
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Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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In addition to Coleman, Binda Colebrook's 'Winter Gardening in the Maritime Northwest' is a classic for maritime climate... always good to say where you are growing in your signature line...
 
Roses are red. Violets are blue. Some poems rhyme. But this is a tiny ad:

The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers:
http://richsoil.com/cards


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