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Dustin Hollis
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I would like to try growing some mushrooms in my unfinished basement using long hanging bags with spent coffee grounds that Starbucks gives away free. Is there any risk of the spores infecting my home? I only say this because I have a timber-framed house with no drywall. Also, I noticed that Racial Mycology is out of stock. When are more expected? Will it be available on Amazon?
Thanks!
 
Dave Dahlsrud
Posts: 498
Location: North-Central Idaho, 4100 ft elev., 24 in precip
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books food preservation fungi hugelkultur trees
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I think it kind of depends on what kind of 'shrooms you plan on growing down there along with what kind of timber your home is framed with, whether they will try to colonize your walls or not. I've grown shiitake, and garden giant in my log home with no problems. I guess if there is some sort of finish on your timbers that would make a difference as well. I think by in large that moisture levels in your logs and home would not be conducive to fungal growth though.
 
Dustin Hollis
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Ok, them no worries on moisture. It's very dry here in Utah, and the wood is finished.
 
Amit Enventres
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Location: Ohio, USA
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Hi!
So, spores are EVERYWHERE anyway. The reason we don't see mushrooms everywhere has to do with conditions. If you make your basement the ideal mushroom growing environment, including the walls, you will have a problem. If you keep your mushrooms sealed and separate, let's say in a garbage bag, then there won't be a problem, no matter how many spores the mushrooms give off. Now, as to the health of bringing in a bunch of spores in an enclosed space, I'm not sure about that. You may be able to grow out the mycelium in the basement and move them to an open-air environment during spawning, or harvest prior to spore ejection so we may never need to answer the health question.

Good luck!
 
John Saltveit
gardener
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I would agree with Amit and Dave. I would only add that some people take the mushrooms outside just when the mushrooms are forming, because that's the only time they produce spores. Also some wouldn't grow oysters inside due to heavy spore load, but shiitake and wine cap are probably less problematic.
John S
PDX OR
 
Peter McCoy
Author
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Yes, I concur with everyone.

Radical Mycology will be back in stock in early May. It will be on Amazon around then as well.

Cheers
Peter
 
220 hours of permaculture video, freaky cheap! http://kck.st/2q6Ycay.
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