• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Jay
  • Anne Miller
  • Jocelyn Campbell
stewards:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
gardeners:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Daron Williams

What plants can we make leaf curd out of?  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 1550
Location: Denver, CO
53
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm trying to experiment with leaf curd; extracting the protein and vitamins from leaves, while leaving behind the fiber and water, so that leaves can actually become a staple instead of a vegetable.

What leaves work? Can I just use any edible leaf, or are there certain necessary characteristics? I'm especially wondering about dandelions and linden or lime (Tillia) trees.
 
Gilbert Fritz
pollinator
Posts: 1550
Location: Denver, CO
53
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There is very little information online, I don't know why. It seems that an important topic has been skirted around. Maybe I will understand the lack of interest once I actually try it!

Anyway, my scanty findings seem to indicate that any non-toxic leaf can be used. I've found a reference to using ash and linden trees, so that is what I will try first. I've got to find some food grade muslin, much tighter then cheesecloth.
 
Posts: 944
Location: Graham, Washington [Zone 7b, 47.041 Latitude] 41inches average annual rainfall, cool summer drought
35
 
Posts: 82
Location: Providence, RI, USA
18
forest garden trees urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Gilbert Fritz wrote:There is very little information online, I don't know why. It seems that an important topic has been skirted around. Maybe I will understand the lack of interest once I actually try it!

Anyway, my scanty findings seem to indicate that any non-toxic leaf can be used. I've found a reference to using ash and linden trees, so that is what I will try first. I've got to find some food grade muslin, much tighter then cheesecloth.



Did you ever try this with linden? I am tempted to try it in the spring and am curious about your results.
 
pollinator
Posts: 133
Location: Zone 3-4 (usually 4) Western South Dakota, central Black Hills
30
bike books building cattle chicken dog food preservation homestead hunting cooking sheep
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here’s one search result I’m sure you’ve seen... but what the heck? It’s interesting, I think. http://fergustheforager.co.uk/2009/06/208/ I’ve never heard of leaf curd, never even dreamed of such a thing, so thanks for bringing it back up. We don’t have that much here in the way of abundant, unused vegetation (brittle area, usually), so I won’t be trying it, but interested in what you come up with from your experiments.
 
Karl Treen
Posts: 82
Location: Providence, RI, USA
18
forest garden trees urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cindy Skillman wrote:Here’s one search result I’m sure you’ve seen... but what the heck? It’s interesting, I think. http://fergustheforager.co.uk/2009/06/208/ I’ve never heard of leaf curd, never even dreamed of such a thing, so thanks for bringing it back up. We don’t have that much here in the way of abundant, unused vegetation (brittle area, usually), so I won’t be trying it, but interested in what you come up with from your experiments.


Thank you! Yes, I will be trying it once the leaves come out. ;)
 
Gilbert Fritz
pollinator
Posts: 1550
Location: Denver, CO
53
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I did try; but I didn't have any proper equipment, so all I ended up with was a few tablespoons of green slime . . . which was the leaf protein, I guess. It didn't taste like much of anything, just a bit grassy. Mixed in with a grain of some sort and spiced properly it might have been fairly good.
 
Posts: 71
Location: zone 6a, ish
21
food preservation forest garden fungi homestead cooking trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I remember reading something in a pamphlet like 20 years ago about using hemp and marijuana leaves for a "tofu-like food," which I can only assume is leaf curd.  I wonder how well they stack up for protein content.
 
Posts: 74
Location: Hamburg, Germany
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It does seem very like tofu - blend and strain once and reserve the liquid, boil and strain a second time and reserve the solids.  I think I'm going to see how much damage I can do to my nettle patches this year with this.
 
If you open the box, you will find Heisenberg strangling Shrodenger's cat. And waving this tiny ad:
2019 PDC for Scientists, Engineers, Educators and experienced Permies
https://permies.com/wiki/100059/PDC-Scientists-Engineers-Educators-experienced
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!