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What is the single most important thing you’ve learned since finding Permies?

 
pollinator
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I realized today, I barely know what I’m doing half the time, but I’ve had to have saved $500 in supplies & lumber since finding Permies.com;

I feel like I’ve become more creative and willing to try things because of this and it’s been a tremendous help.

The statement that changed my brain was “turn your backyard into homedepot” 🤯

I was just curious what other peoples most valuable lesson has been on their Permie Journey as I am confident I’ll learn that much more from this question being answered.
 
gardener
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I can't say there is one single thing so much as a trickle of things. I find little gems within posts when I least expect it.

Try new things

Observe, observe, observe

How "be nice" (the core rule of Permies) looks different to different people, so be even nicer.

Practical things, like how to keep the land from drying out when there's a summer drought. Or avoid eating cooked paw paw fruit.

 
master steward
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What a great question Chris!
I've learnt so much too. Not always what I thought I would be learning when I came to this site either...
In practical terms, I've learnt a lot about soil biology, and realised how much more there is to learn. I've not reached Fukuoka's do nothing gardening extreme yet, but hope to find out how my soil/climate wants to be treated and have bought myself a soil microscope to see what effect I'm having.
Maybe the biggest thing was that the soil microbes need the plants as much as the plants need the soil microbes. I always thought of weeds as being in competition, and only useful as mulch, but actually they also keep the soil biota population buoyant in between crops. It's just a matter of having 'weeds' that are in balance and controllable (ha ha! easy I don't think!)
Unexpectedly I've also learnt a fair amount about communication, as Nikki says above. Also a little bit of coding in putting pictures and tables in the posts, and (since becoming staff) a little about Search Engine Optimisation. Although that's not what Permies is about, by getting higher in the results we can help Paul infect more minds in world domination and make the future a better place.
I've also learned how much we can learn from others in different parts of the world. Even in completely different situations there is always so much similarity too. I think the more we participate the more we get out, and others too.

source
 
master steward
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Permaculture

Before finding the Permies Forum I had never heard the word.  Actually I still have not heard the word, though I have read a lot about the principles of permaculture.

I have learned so much from the folks here on the forum.

I have met a lot of wonderful folks that enjoy the same things I enjoy.

I have learned about Rocket Mass Heaters, mushrooms, wood chips and coffee grounds.

I have learned the difference between green mulch and brown mulch.

I have learned about humanure, wofati, and earth berms.

I have learn who these folks are: sepp holzer, geoff lawton, and
masanobu fukuoka.

Though these are all part of permaculture after all.
 
pollinator
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I am not alone.
 
Chris Vee
pollinator
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Nikki Roche wrote:I can't say there is one single thing so much as a trickle of things. I find little gems within posts when I least expect it.

Try new things

Observe, observe, observe

How "be nice" (the core rule of Permies) looks different to different people, so be even nicer.

Practical things, like how to keep the land from drying out when there's a summer drought. Or avoid eating cooked paw paw fruit.



…but if you HAD to pick 1 thing… 🤓
 
Chris Vee
pollinator
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Ara Murray wrote:I am not alone.



& you’re loved and so appreciated Ara 😊
 
Ara Murray
pollinator
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Thank you Chris and everyone else for being the family I would choose.
 
pollinator
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Chris you basically said my answer in your question - The most important thing I've learned is that we are all just muddling through (and this applies to more than just permaculture), doing the best we can with the information we have at the time, and when you see someone who seems to know what they're doing it's just because they've gone out and made the mistakes already and learned from them. The people who move forward do so because they are willing to muddle through no matter the mistakes.
 
pollinator
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Probably simply that I am not the only one trying a bunch of ideas and learning as I go.
 
pioneer
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I now know I can design a food and medicine garden on much less land due to permaculture principles and practices to be able to sustain a large family group.

I've learned more about rocket mass heating so I can keep that family warmer on less fuel.

I've found a community I can feel proud to be a part of because there are teachers around every corner happy to assist, and others ready to listen to what I have to contribute; and plenty of folks who have fun with silly stuff, so there is balance to all the serious things.

And it doesn't matter where in the world you are, what your personal situation is, all are welcome as long as you are sensible about kindness.
 
pollinator
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My best lesson: go with nature.
 
master steward
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I've been hanging around permies for over 10 yrs, so it's pretty hard to reduce it to a "single" most important thing. That said, I have been quite impressed by the SKiP program and have tackled projects that I might not have tried because of it, although generally in connection with other regular threads on permies.

That said, right at the top of the list:

I've learned that there are permies out there that will help me with any problem I encounter - free advice, free encouragement, free step-by-step coaching, and when I don't understand, I know I can ask questions and get more info and more answers.
 
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The most important?? HMMM...that I am not alone in the world! That somewhere the knowledge of our rural ancestors still matters. My Great Grand Parents lived for decades on their homestead without indoor plumbing or electricity. I grew up on that same homestead. The place was a self sustaining wonderland. Root cellars...one was dug under the house...not a basement, the house was on logs balanced on piles of flagstone to level, smoke house with sod roof, thick stone walled milk cooler building under the shade of a big poplar tree...never got over 45 degrees, hand crank milk separator, an under ground pig shelter, large rabbit hutches, milk sheds, sheep barns, Saddle "house" for all horse gear, Wooden graineries with the wall studs on the outside so they were more mouse proof, 2 steel round graineries, chicken house and brooders, turkey brooders (very interesting), blacksmith shop, cobbler shop, butcher shop, gardens, fruit trees, good coral system, 3 wells...one stock and garden well dug next to a seasonal creek.... recharged by spring run-off, 2 holer privy, wood cook stove and coal fired furnaces to heat the house, large clothes line, mechanic shop, amazing compost piles...and horse drawn to tractor etc farm equipment.
I am now homesteading for 18 years, building with all non-electric hand tools, building a non-electric all natural material home in about half of a large pole barn. Deep respect for all those who try for a simpler life, good info and great folks on Permies!
 
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That there isn't *one* correct solution to a "problem." I've really also learned that my definition of problem is often just how I'm viewing the issue I'm displeased with!
 
master steward
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If forced to select only one thing …..it is that there are still many nice people left in the world.
 
pollinator
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Woodchips and more woodchips.  Do what nature does in the forest.  Rinse repeat.
 
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gardener
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People tell you your ideas won't work and call you crazy when they are 2 steps or more below you on the eco-scale. It just means you are more advanced in understanding the systems than they are. Likewise, if you think someone is crazy, they may be two or more steps above you, so learning a bit more may be warranted before deciding.
 
pollinator
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The importance of organic matter in soil. I started reading Permies when I first heard something about hugelkultur. Then I read Redhawk's soil series, which transformed how I garden.
 
pollinator
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After finding permies, I realized that I was spending so much time at being angry at bad guys, which kept me from building a better world in my backyard. I have learned to recognize that anger, and to turn it into a wooden spoon, an appleseed planting event, a chat with my chickens, an investigation into cast iron, or when I feel lazy to just go out and let the nature monster kidnap me :D In short, I have learned to be in my backyard and actually do something!
 
pollinator
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I have learned that I am far from alone - even in my own neighborhood! That's hugely encouraging!!
 
Bring out your dead! Or a tiny ad:
FREE Perma Veggies Book! - Learn how to grow the most delicious and nutritious food with the least amount of work.
https://permies.com/t/238620/perennial-vegetables/FREE-Perma-Veggies-Book
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