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What kind of wild berry am I growing?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 32
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I went for a walk in the yard and saw this berry bush.
The plant is about 10-12 ft tall.
the younger leaves have a cloth like texture and the older leaves are shiny and smooth.

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pollinator
Posts: 756
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Nice bush! Really like those deep green leaves. What part of the world are you in? I've never seen a bush like that. The berries make me think of gooseberries because of the shape and the veins/ribs you can see under the skin. The leaves don't look like anything I've seen.
 
Johnny Gisson
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I think it is a honeysuckle bush.

looks pretty close to me.
 
steward
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Location: Maine (zone 5)
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Looks like honeysuckle to me too. I cut a lot of it out from under our productive trees. I've never seen anything eat it and it spreads pretty fast. I cut them as close to the ground as possible just after they flower. I suppose once it was dead and dried out you could use it as dead hedge material. Maybe chip it and mulch with it?
 
Johnny Gisson
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It is invasive I got many of them that need to be cut down and it grows sky high as well. Too bad it has no edible purpose.
 
Johnny Gisson
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It has been identified by a horticulturalist as a Asian Honeysuckle.

Amur honeysuckle

http://www.invasive.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=1237033

inedible and invasive
 
Johnny Gisson
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Craig Dobbelyu wrote:Looks like honeysuckle to me too. I cut a lot of it out from under our productive trees. I've never seen anything eat it and it spreads pretty fast. I cut them as close to the ground as possible just after they flower. I suppose once it was dead and dried out you could use it as dead hedge material. Maybe chip it and mulch with it?



When the leaves are young they look a bit different than the older leaves. Fooled me to think it was a different plant.
I didn't realize this was honeysuckle. That is one of the most invasive plants I ever seen.
I will cut them down now before the berries wind up in the soil!
 
Posts: 175
Location: Timisoara, Romania, 45N, 21E, Z6-7
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This is interesting.

I was just seeing this plant planted in a park, growing in a shrub form.
Maybe 4-5 bushes at some feet away from each other.
Some had orange fruit while others dark red.
Have no idea what flowers looks like.

I searched the genus and, to me at least, looks more like tatarica than maackii.

It didn't look invasive where it was planted for ornamental purposes.
On the other hand, i haven't seen any honeysuckle invade anything except to stretch out and climb whatever trellis/tree was available but the plants i've sen were self supporting shrubs, not vines.
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Posts: 149
Location: Northern California Mediterranean climate zone 10b
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Honeysuckle does have a use; it's medicinal!  Most plants are useful in some way.

http://bearmedicineherbals.com/a-new-infatuation-wild-honeysuckle.html
 
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looks like honeysuckle.  There are a variety of medicinal uses for honeysuckle berries and leaves...aren't you lucky!  You can Google them on line( try bearmedicineherbals.com). When ever you see a plant on your property, remember nature, in her infinite wisdom is attempting to fulfill a niche..so take the time to work WITH nature if you can instead if managing nature.

honeysuckle can make a great barrier and can harvested to treat colds, flu, fevers,..lots of uses...some have efible berries depending on the species so it is a good idea to accurately identify what you have.  Great in soaps and as strewing vines also!
 
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