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Urban plants with dog pee  RSS feed

 
Ronaldo Montoya
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Hi, at this moment im staying in barcelona for a couple of months and i been walking around the streets looking the plants in the parks and gardens and i discovered there are some edible plants.

I found tataxacum officinale, portulacca oleracea and plantago mayor.

The thing is the i found this plants in parks where people bring thir dogs to pee and shit.

Do you think it would be dangerous to eat this plants?
If a dog is sick and pee over a plant and then i ate it , could this be dangerous for me , what do you think?
 
Douglas Campbell
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Dog poop can carry multiple pathogens, including long-lived cysts of nematode worms, Toxoplasmosis, enteric bacteria and others.  All of these would likely b killed by thorough cooking (boiling).
Dog pee might carry pathogens, but might also be contaminated with medications like anti-helminthics (worm medicine) etc.  Medications would not necessarily be destroyed by cooking.

 
Ronaldo Montoya
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Douglas Campbell wrote:Dog poop can carry multiple pathogens, including long-lived cysts of nematode worms, Toxoplasmosis, enteric bacteria and others.  All of these would likely b killed by thorough cooking (boiling).
Dog pee might carry pathogens, but might also be contaminated with medications like anti-helminthics (worm medicine) etc.  Medications would not necessarily be destroyed by cooking.



So , you dont recommend to eat these plants.
I dont like to cook green vegetables i prefer to eat them raw , isnt there a way to make these vegetables appropriate for human consumption?
 
Douglas Campbell
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I would not eat plants potentially contaminated with dog excreta, and short of thorough cooking for pathogens, I know of no way to reliably decontaminate them.
In fact, nematode eggs are tremendously resistant most treatments, and most dogs carry them.
 
Rebecca Norman
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The plants you mentioned being interested in there are very common, and you can probably find them in another location without so many dog-walkers.
 
Ronaldo Montoya
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Here in spain people use to pick up dogs poo inmediately after the dogs make poo.
So the poo doesnt stay in the soil , do you think it can still be dangerous?

I found a lot of verdolaga growing over the corners of cement floor, they grow when there are little soil. But i think that maybe dogs can pee there, but not so much.

Do you think it would be dangerous to eat those verdolaga?
 
Galadriel Freden
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Location: West Yorkshire, UK
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I have observed that if there is some kind of landmark dogs prefer to pee on it, so in an expanse of concrete, they would be more likely to pee on the plants growing on it than the concrete itself.  That said, I'm not too worried about pee--if I wild harvest I try to pick things growing above pee height, or away from high traffic dogwalking trails, but if it rained the night before I'll harvest below pee height;  I don't harvest stuff right next to a path or trail, but walk a little ways off it to harvest.  I just wash it off at home. 
 
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