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Using allelopathic trees in mulch?

 
Scott Reid
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Location: Northeast Utah zone 6B
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Primary concern here is whether using woodchips from trees with allelopathic properties is a good idea or not.

Much of the land in my area tends to be covered with juniper trees and its a high probability that any land we buy will have said trees on it.
That being said, is it safe to use wood chips from such trees for mulch?

Thank you for your input.

EDIT: Updated with proper term (I hope)
 
Rebecca Norman
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What are trees with anaerobic properties?
 
Judith Browning
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Did you mean 'allelopathic'?
 
Scott Reid
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Heh, yes thats what I meant.

Sorry for the goof.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Juniper trees exude the allelopathic compounds from their roots.
The other concern many have is the acidification of soil by juniper chips, this is a minor concern in reality, the needles will give more acidity than the wood chips.

I usually recommend keeping juniper wood chips to paths unless you first compost them enough that they begin to turn a brownish color, but that is mostly so you don't put the sap on the soil.
Junipers, like pines, have resinous sap that will burn quite well, because the sap contains the allelopathic compounds but in smaller quantites it becomes prudent to let the wood chips age at least 6 months before using them in garden areas.
It is more a play it safe thing over a must do thing though.

If you have an area you want to plant blueberries or serviceberries in, then that would be a great place to use the needles as mulch or even dig them in the top six inches of soil.

Redhawk
 
Marco Banks
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I use eucalyptus tree mulch in my food forest.  Nothing will grow around it for the first 18 months so its a great mulch for killing grass and letting a piece of land lay fallow for a year.  In that way, any carbon is good carbon.

But I don't put it everywhere, and certainly not in places where i'm growing baby plants from seed.  You can use it as mulch around established plants, but you've got to be careful.  I don't pile it up too thick or too close to a small pepper or whatever other young plant I'm seeking to get established.   It doesn't harm other trees that are established.  But once it's been on the ground for a year or two, it's good stuff and you can just rake it back and plant right into the improved soil below it.

If I had space, I'd just pile it up and let it lay for a year or two before I use it, but I don't, so I don't.  But there is always somewhere that needs a heavy layer of chips where I don't need to plant right away.
 
Scott Reid
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Location: Northeast Utah zone 6B
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Thanks for the input.

This is good stuff to know since I will undoubtedly have much juniper to deal with.
I don't want to waste anything by unnecessarily burning stuff that I can put to use in some fashion or another.
 
Tyler Ludens
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There's rarely a need to burn brush, in my opinion.  Low windrows of brush can be placed on contour to slow run-off.  Brush can be buried as hugelkultur or buried wood beds.  Large amounts can be used as brush dams in gullies.

 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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