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Any idea how to make use of sea salt minerals into our soil ?

 
Mostafa Ismail
Posts: 55
Location: south of Giza Egypt . Home in cairo
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I know that most of  soil minerals ends up into the seas and oceans .

if it so we don't have to look any further to get the minerals into our soil .

here in Egypt I know farmer from different place spry salt into their clover fields  before they flood their filed with water

and they assure me with the great results they get and how green clover get , am talking here about very fine fertile clay soil


so is there a way to make use of the sea salt ?

is there a way to get the best of it ?

can we add some to the compost ?
 
wayne fajkus
Posts: 608
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It's not uncommon to dilute sea "water" at a rate of 10 parts water to one part seawater. If you are dealing with the extracted mineral (no water ), some googling and math should get you to the same ratio.
 
Su Ba
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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I don't have answers for you, but I can relate what I do on my own farm.

I collect seawater from the ocean about 15 miles from my farm. 3 times a year, using a handheld watering can, I lightly sprinkle my growing beds. I use enough just to wet the entire surface of the soil, but not soak into the soil below the surface. Because I do not have a high salt content in my homemade compost (my livestock feed is not high in salt, thus their manure is not high in salt), plus the fact that my farm experiences leeching due to heavy tropical rains, I do not see adverse salt effects in my soil. After sprinkling the seawater, I immediately lightly till it into the top 3 inches of garden soil.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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You can use quite a bit more salt water on a field with out adverse things happening than most people think.
If you want to make use of sea water, then most fields can handle around 200 gallons per hectare once every 3 years.
If you are going to use the mineral salt then you can use as much as 50 pounds per 1000 sq. feet with no issues at all.

Keep in mind this is not something you do as a yearly treatment, every 3 to 5 years is a good schedule if your soil is mineral poor. 

In either case you are not going to create a "salinity" problem since you aren't saturating the soil, but instead setting up a leaching situation.
The salts will slowly work their way down into the soil, the plants will take up those minerals that become available through bacteria and fungi interactions.
The end result will be better friability and mineralization of the treated soil.

Redhawk
 
Su Ba
pollinator
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Yes, I've never seen any salinity problems yet on my farm, and the plants in the treated beds seem a bit more robust and healthy looking (though that may be just wishful thinking on my part). But the annual complete soil test comes back with better levels each passing year.

I'm a believer in micro nutrient application. Apoly a little bit at a time, but frequently. Since I'm in the tropics where leeching is an issue, micro applications works for me.

I'm just now learning more about soil science. Truthfully, I'm skipping anything that doesn't apply to my own area. This is going to be my one and only farm, so I just skim over the material about other soil types and locations. But I'm learning that different methods and results are really dependent upon one's soil type and weather. Lots of variables!
 
Mark Morgan
Posts: 16
Location: Jackson, Michigan Zone 5
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I had a friend tell me about putting salt solution on asparagus. My asparagus patch had been doing very poorly even after 4 years from planting the crowns. I made a heavy brine solution in a five gallon bucket and applied it to the whole bed. I have only applied the salt once, the first year we had decent size spears for the first time. It's been four years since I put the brine on the asparagus bed and we continue to have very large and tasty spears. All the other plants in the garden would not stand up to the amount of salt we put on this particular bed. I agree with what others have said not very much and not very often when it comes to salt. There are other ways to re-mineralize your soil and not have to worry about too much salt.  

Check out this article I wrote about Basalt Rock dust. Basalt rock dust helps grow plants

The article describes how volcanic rock dusts help plants grow better. Towards the end of the article there are descriptions of things to get you started with rock dusts.
 
Angelika Maier
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Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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I don't live by the ocean, but how much sea water per m2?
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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I usually recommend application of solution (sea water or dissolved sea minerals) of 5 gallons (20 L) per square meter.

Redhawk
 
Libbie Hawker
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Location: Friday Harbor, WA
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Around here, a lot of people mix eel grass or kelp into their compost bins to get sea minerals. But we have easy access to public beaches and you can just gather up what you need from the shore. What part of Egypt do you live in? If you're in the northern part of the Delta, you might be able to gather kelp from beaches for composting.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Mostafa, yes you can make great use of sea salt on your fields and you can do it in small amounts so you don't have to worry about overdoing it.
I use about 1/2 dry Liter for every sq. m of garden space, sprinkle the sea salt as evenly as you can and you should be good to go.
In your area you should be able to do this every growing season with out any worries of build up of salinity.

Redhawk
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
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