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Posts: 5
Location: Fort Lonesome, FL.
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hello guys ..

my drains are screwed got water coming up in the sink in the kitchen when i do my laundry
i am thinking a collapsed pipe before the septic so i want to cut a hole in the wall and just route the pipes outside.

banana circle for the laundry

but what about the greese .. we collect the greese in a can but when we scrub the dishes im sure that screws the pipes.

that said
anyone have any setups for this problem ?

i have seen many online but i want your opinions on what i should do

i was thinking of routing a 2" pipe out the kitchen and then attaching laundry and running out to the same spot .. but wont greese and stuff kill the banana circle ?
i also got mad nature and 4 big dogs
 
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I've no personnel experience, but up here (NY) they used what the called a dry well.  Meaning a buried settling tank that would then slowly drain downhill. 

I like the idea of some sort of settling tank or barrel. Just to keep your solids a chance to settle. At my place I was concerned with soaps in my dish water, so I'm not collecting that water at all.  But I suspect the concentrations are so low that I could use it for anything but drinking - so maybe I should.
 
Posts: 224
Location: Southern Arizona
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What I've done is separate the drains on my double sink in the kitchen.  The wash sink (with food particles, grease, etc.) still goes to the septic tank, but the rinse sink drain pipe goes out through the wall and then into a branched drain system into mulch pits around 3 small cherry trees.

By only using the rinse sink greywater I avoid all the hassles with filtering out the food particles and grease traps, and of course the ongoing need to constantly clean said filters and traps.

This won't fix your problem, but then if you can't fix it yourself you REALLY need to hire a plumber, ignoring the problem is not a viable option in the long run.
 
pollinator
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Location: Sierra Nevadas, CA 6400'
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Before you re-pipe everything… do you have any cleanouts installed? That's the usual way of cleaning out blockages. Grease, mineral buildups, hair — something will inevitably block up your pipes. It's pretty standard practice to install cleanouts every 100' or so in between the kitchen and the septic. They're designed so you can easily throw a snake down them and clean out any blockages.

As per just piping out your water, it really depends on what you put down your drain and where the pipe ends in. I'd recommend the Builder's Greywater Guide and Create an Oasis With Greywater from http://oasisdesign.net/ to get a better handle on greywater systems.
 
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I'm a plumber by trade, most grease clogs I've dealt with happen within the first seven feet or so of the kitchen sink.  I have seen a pipes literally 100 percent full for several feet. If there is a clean out available you could try that but all your doing is pushing " chunks" farther down.  PVC is cheap, if you can locate the clog and get to the pipe, just cut out about 10ft at the problem area. You don't dump grease down the sink you mentioned.  As you probably know, chemical drain openers are not good for the little creatures that live in your septic tank.    Larry
 
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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The way we keep the grease from going down the drain is to jar it for the grease pit we have which contains some wonderful bacteria that love to eat grease.
Plates and other residual containing cookware gets licked clean by the dogs (they love this treat) then the dishes are sterilized so we can use them again.
Our gray water heads to a settling tank then to a filter bed and from there to the gardens.

We don't use much grease or grease containing foods but on occasion we do fry some foods.
Wolf did an accounting one month and we average about 2 liters of grease from all sources, including the deep fryer over a month period.

Redhawk
 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I'm setting up a wood chip n' worm filter for my sink effluent.
I won't be pouring grease down the drain(it's too useful anyway!),but the residuals from the dishes should  be felt with by the compost worms and micto biota.
 
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