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Help identifying plants sprouting around new fruit tree plantings  RSS feed

 
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I recently planted seven fruit trees at my folks' property in northern Kentucky (zone 6b). They are all heirloom cultivars, an Arkansas Black, Fuji, and Grimes Golden apples, Methley & Shiro plums, and two grafted Paw Paws. My growing experience comes mostly from apprenticing on a nursery in New Mexico and I became familiar with the weeds and beneficial plants present in the high desert. Here I am unsure about many of the species I have found sprouting in the circles around the trees where I mulched and seeded with red and white clover. I'd like to know what they are before I start pulling and hope this is the right forum to ask. I've numbered each photo below to make it easier for responses.

Any recommendations on the best field guides or methods to begin identifying these on my own?

#1


#2

...plantain?

#3


#4


#5


#6


#7

Center frame, not the euonymus

#8

This and euonymus dominate the hillside. I'm told this species is invasive and metro parks actively try and eradicate it

#9
 
Posts: 145
Location: Courtrai Area, Flanders Region, Belgium Europe
18
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These 2 i have in my garden.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliaria_petiolata

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficaria_verna

I use both in salads. Pileworth (Ficaria verna) i only use before flowers appear.


In frame 8? You have something that reminds of some specios of cress but i don't have the gang of it to enlarge the pictures. So i'm not sure.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardamine_hirsuta


I noticed a mistake in my comment nummer 8? = number 7. The cress it reminds me off - is cardamine or bitter cress in English. Looks like that plantfamiliy anyway. The picture does not show enough detail. If it is bitter cress - then it also good for salads.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardamine

 
Posts: 46
Location: Oklahoma - Zone 6b today 7a tomorrow
5
chicken food preservation forest garden
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1 looks like Virginia creeper. 2 is not plantain. It has parallel veins from stem to tip.
 
Posts: 19
Location: Northern Kentucky
3
forest garden homestead
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Number 3 is a wood nettle
4 appears to be a young honeysuckle
5 is wild mustard at the flowering stage, second year growth, and 9 it's also wild mustard in the first year rosette stage.
8i believe is the pilewort https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficaria_verna
Also appears to be some common ground ivy growing with it
 
Posts: 5
Location: Western Massachusetts
3
chicken goat pig
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Thomas Elpel's Botany in a Day is good for N American plant ID

Eat up that garlic mustard! It's loaded with vitamins and antioxidants. You can also dry it and use it as a gomashio-like seasoning or infuse apple cider vinegar with the fresh plant (aerial parts).
 
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2 looks a lot like calendula
 
pollinator
Posts: 247
Location: Maine, zone 5
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food preservation forest garden homestead solar trees wood heat
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5 and 9 are garlic mustard.  You may want to pull that out to keep it from getting out of hand.  Good news is that you can find recipes for it online.
 
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