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Growing Oysters on Straw in Burlap Bags  RSS feed

 
Dennis Bangham
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I have a couple very colonized 5 lb sawdust bags of oyster.  Warm Blue and Elm.  I want to see if these will grow on straw after soaking in soap and then a hot water lime bath. 
How should I do this?
Do I put the substrate (mycelium/straw) filled bags into plastic bag to keep out contamination. A month maybe?
Should I treat the burlap (peroxide)? 
Or am I overthinking this?
Any suggestions appreciated.
 
John Saltveit
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You could heat the straw for one hour in filtered/well water at 140-160 degrees F.  I wouldn't put them in a plastic bag-anaerobic rot.  Soap? Why?
Keep Elm oyster and Blue oyster separated. They are different species and can compete.
You can cook the burlap bag. Burlap is much better than plastic.
You're on the ladder.  Congratulations.  You rock!
John S
PDX OR
 
Casie Becker
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I'm trying to grow mushrooms for the first time, myself and so just recently went through a lot of the permies threads on this topic. In addition to the similar threads recommended at the bottom of the forum, you might want to read https://permies.com/t/21402/Oyster-mushrooms-grown-shredded-sterilized.
 
Dennis Bangham
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I got the burlap ideas from a fungi perfecti. Instead of Chips I did pasteurized straw.  The guide was The Mycleium Running Oyster Patch" that comes with the Oyster Order that I found on the internet.
Here is the key paragraph.
"A slight variation to this method is to stuff the inoculated chips into an untreated burlap sack to make a “Mycobag”. Be sure to use untreated food grade burlap for this application (e.g., a coffee bean sack). Soak the burlap in a .3% hydrogen peroxide solution for 1 hour to help eliminate potential contaminants prior to putting the inoculated chips into it. Once the bag is full, tie it closed. Put the burlap sack in a larger clean plastic bag, tying the plastic bag closed around the neck of the burlap. This will allow the neck of the burlap to act as a wick for air exchange in the bag."
The soap and Lime method was taken from a "Lets Grow Mushrooms" video by Mark Keith.
I am guessing that one month is long enough for the spawn to colonize the straw.  I will keep the bags in the shade and bring them inside for days that get above 90F.  

I am new at growing so everything is an experiment.

Thanks for the help.
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