Win a copy of Landrace Gardening this week in the Seeds and Breeding forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

building a spinning wheel

 
gardener
Posts: 1813
Location: Zone 6b
212
cat fish trees books urban food preservation solar woodworking greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I play with wood. My suffering better half (hubby) plays with wood. We have woodworking tools, some were built from plans! (www.woodgears.ca)

I found these plans this evening:

http://www.craftsmanspace.com/free-projects/spinning-wheel-plan.html  The design reminds me of some of the modern Ashford looms R Ransom is fond of.
spinning_wheel.jpg
[Thumbnail for spinning_wheel.jpg]
The pretty picture showing what it looks like
 
master steward & author
Posts: 23103
Location: Left Coast Canada
6788
3
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Building your own wheel = AWESOME!

Those look like good plans.  Cute wheel too.  I say go for it!  
Although the picture in the plans and of the wheel doesn't show it, that design is for a double drive spinning wheel.  My personal favourite style.  
On the plans, page 16 and 17, with the part they call the flyer bearing (orifice), might be a bit challenging.  It's a metal piece that will need to be manufactured somehow.  Usually, this is made as one piece with what they are calling 'flyer axel' (flyer shaft).  This makes it stronger and easier to ballance the flyer.  As two pieces, it's easy to get things out of whack which makes spinning difficult.  The orifice also needs to be smooth where the yarn goes.  (I put the common, modern, North American terms in brackets for those parts.  There's a lot of different nomenclature for spinning wheel parts around the world and over time.  No single naming is correct.)

The flyer is going to be the hardest part to get right.  It needs to be well balanced or spinning becomes a chore.  It helps if you have experience spinning on a flyer wheel so you know what it feels like to spin on a well-balanced flyer.  The other challenge is that there are never enough bobbins.  One solution for this is to buy a commercial flyer and build the wheel around that.  That way, you can get as many bobbins as you like - https://www.ashford.co.nz/flyers/product/standard-flyer-single

But of course, that's not necessary.  Lots of wheels have home made flyers.  

Another great wheel to make is a spindle wheel.  Spindle wheels can be much faster and more efficient than flyer wheels, and you don't need the fuss of bobbins.  here's a pdf of a really basic spindle wheel.  

I really like the Indian style spinning wheel.  It's much faster for cotton and silk than any of the modern wheels out there.

 
Deb Rebel
gardener
Posts: 1813
Location: Zone 6b
212
cat fish trees books urban food preservation solar woodworking greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You're typing to a woman who should have been a machinist. I have hardcore hours both in engineering training and shop floor-line experience. I'm building up the equipment and favors to be able to do so.

Remember the chesstok speedweve? I still want to make a variation of those.

Thanks for telling me it's a doubledrive.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 23103
Location: Left Coast Canada
6788
3
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Deb Rebel wrote:You're typing to a woman who should have been a machinist. I have hardcore hours both in engineering training and shop floor-line experience. I'm building up the equipment and favors to be able to do so.



In that case, I recommend a flyer shaft like the one in this post http://www.fullchisel.com/blog/?p=4292



 
Deb Rebel
gardener
Posts: 1813
Location: Zone 6b
212
cat fish trees books urban food preservation solar woodworking greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you, ma'am, great link. Sometime this winter when I turn to this project, YES I will post all the lurid details and the success or reasons I'm taking up drinking and roasting marshmellows over the flaming wreckage...
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 23103
Location: Left Coast Canada
6788
3
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looking through my unmentionably large collection of spinning wheels in the house, I discovered that I have a wheel built to the plans linked to in the first post of this thread, or if not those plans, ones very much like it.

Sadly, the wheel isn't in working condition, but it can be made to work.  If I put a modern flyer on it and adjust the front maiden a bit, I think it will work well.  The wheel I have looks to be built in the 1980s to early 2000s.

Pictures to come soon.
 
Deb Rebel
gardener
Posts: 1813
Location: Zone 6b
212
cat fish trees books urban food preservation solar woodworking greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm all eyes. Please. Right now it's weeds, more weeds, and trying to make some stuff to pay the bills.

I ran across two remainders of skeins of some 15% mohair and 85% virgin wool (originally 190 yards, I think I have two dabs about 10 yards each) from a place called Brown Sheep Yarn on the western edge of Nebraska, Mitchell, NE. Spun and dyed by them it claims.

It's incentive.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 23103
Location: Left Coast Canada
6788
3
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I found a book at the library the other day that might help.  spinning wheel building and restoration by Kronenberg.  

It's definitely worth a read, but I'm not certain if it's worth spending too much money on unless you intend to build/repair many spinning wheels.  If that's the case, then I think the big book of handspinning is a better investment as it teaches the mechanics of how the wheels work so you can know the necessary and sufficient conditions for making a really good wheel.  
 
Don't mess with me you fool! I'm cooking with gas! Here, read this tiny ad:
permies.com affiliate program
https://permies.com/wiki/affiliate
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic