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Some Edible Mushrooms  RSS feed

 
Posts: 149
Location: near Athens, GA
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I grew up in the mountains of NC, in a temperate rainforest.  My family owned a little grocery store and I grew up roaming the woods, especially interested in my favorite non-meat food, mushrooms.  That said, I am not an expert.  I carry at least 1 field guide with me on every mushroom hunting trip, even after 30 year experience.... and, if there is any questions, I do a spore print to be sure.  I can identify several varieties by sight though.  A question in another post, today, was regarding puffballs.  I may have been unintentionally flippant.  Mushroom hunters identify 4 or 5 mushrooms (usually) that are so easily identifiable and edible as to be called "no brainers" and on nearly all of the lists are giant puffballs.  Here is an old government publication to get aspiring mushroom hunters started.  https://archive.org/details/somecommonmushro00charrich ; Although there are some very good websites, my first recommendation would be to apprentice under an older mushroom hunter (age is a good reference in a field in which fool hearty people may find a quick end).  Barring that, a mycology course at a local college/university would be recommended.  If you have resource to neither, or are stubborn and of a rebellious, independent nature... as am I... The National Audubon Society's Field Guide To North American Mushrooms, David Aurora's books and 100 Edible Mushrooms are good starting places if you are looking for mushrooms to eat.  If you are looking for mushrooms to sell, take extra measures of care.  If you are looking for "other" mushrooms, be especially careful.  We gardeners may take sepp holzer's advice for incorporating mushrooms into our Permaculture systems.  His chapter on mushroom growing is absolutely brilliant.  Sure , paul stamets goes in to more detail.... way more detail.... hundreds of pages of detail.... but, he is a specialist.  If I can attain a fractional level of being a generalist like Mr. Holzer, I will be satisfied.
 
garden master
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Even the Mycologists I know take at least one field guide with them when they go mushroom hunting.

I have just a few that grow on my farm that I know from being shown the good to eat ones. Others I plan on purchasing the spore and growing so I know I'm safe.

 
Wj Carroll
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Location: near Athens, GA
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A good book for wild edibles in Arkansas is by Billy Jo Tatum, "Wild Food Field Guide and Cookbook".  It was published late 60s/early 70s.  It is well written and has great recipes.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Thank you for that title! I will find a copy for my bookshelves.

Redhawk
 
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Wj Carroll wrote:A good book for wild edibles in Arkansas is by Billy Jo Tatum, "Wild Food Field Guide and Cookbook".  It was published late 60s/early 70s.  It is well written and has great recipes.



We knew her years ago, back when the Arkansas Craft Guild still had a big show during the spring festival in Mountain View.  And we have the book inscribed by her...wonderful, smart, fun insightful lady....and yes, it's a very good book too 
 
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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My favorite is Edible Wild Mushrooms  by Fischer and Bessette. It's well organized and easy for a beginner to understand.
 
After burning through the drip stuff and the french press stuff, Paul has the last, ever, coffee maker. Better living through buying less crap.
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