• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

How to breed peppers (Video)

 
Emerson White
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


I thought you guys might enjoy this video.

From here
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Awesome info. Jack Spirko just did a podcast and touched on this a little bit, its cool to see it in practice. Thanks for sharing.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
great video emerson, i did a little bit of hot pepper breeding last season. the seeds are in the soil now and im waiting for them to pop, cant wait to see what i get.
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Since you guys probably know what you are doing, I thought I would ask some questions regarding hybrids.

1. If you plant 2 hybrid plants and they cross pollinate, how does the first generation act? Will the plants from the seeds taken from the hybrid plants produce fruit that is some type of form of the parent plant, or could it be a mixture of both maternal and paternal? And is that considered F1 or F2?

2. Also, this is my understanding and correct me if I am wrong…..When 2 open pollinated plants cross, the plants that are grown from the seed of those plants will be an F1 and will be a combo of both parents. If those F1 plants are crossed with each other and only each other for the next 7 generations and the unwanted characteristics culled out, then that is a new type of hybrid or is it considered a new open pollinated variety?

3. I saw on seedsave.org the following:

PLANT: Separate varieties with short styles (most modern varieties) by at least 10 feet. Varieties with long styles (heirlooms and older varieties) need at least 100 feet to ensure purity. If solitary bees are prevalent, separate all varieties at least 100 feet and place another flowering crop between.

How do you tell the difference between short and long styles? Is this an obvious difference visually?

Hopefully that makes sense.

 
Emerson White
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
1) The first generation of hybrids are F1 hybrids, since their parents were likely to be inbred lines (containing two copied of one set of genes) they will all contain the same two sets of genes. When they breed with each other you can get two copies of one set or two copies of the other or (far more likely) something in between. Since there is so much variation in this second generation (F2) there is no way to ensure what you get out.

2) It's not hard and fast to 7 generations and some traits cannot be dehybridized (fixed in an open pollinated variety) with standard breeding practices. If you want to make a new open pollinated variety remember to plant lots and lots and lots of seeds and make sure that you don't leave them open to any old sailor pollen that comes wafting in to port on a bee.

3)I don't know for certain about this, I'd suggest that you stick with 100+ feet.
 
John Polk
steward
Pie
Posts: 7768
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
240
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There are 5 major species of peppers.  Some interbreed easily, some so-so, and some not at all.  If you plan on crossing peppers, you need to determine if you are dealing with two compatible species.  For quick ref, about ½ way down this page is a chart showing compatibilities:

http://peppermania.com/chile_facts.html
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic