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Chicken coop material list  RSS feed

 
Barn Gulian
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Hello, all,

Recently I've purchased DYI chicken coop plan with an included material list, but I'm not so sure if it's made according to the US standards and if I'll be able to find all materials in some shop in Houston where I live
Please check the pictures I've attached. Can anyone help me on this issue?

Thanks a lot in advance!
MaterialList_Page_1.jpg
[Thumbnail for MaterialList_Page_1.jpg]
MaterialList1
MaterialList_Page_2.jpg
[Thumbnail for MaterialList_Page_2.jpg]
MaterialList2
 
James Freyr
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All the materials will be available at a hardware store/lumber yard. All the dimensions listed are the final cut sizes which you'll have to do on site. For example, buy a 16' 3x3 to cut to the 13'9". If they don't have 3x3, you'll have to buy a 4x4, which is really 3.5x3.5" and rip a half inch off two sides. All plywood comes in 4x8 sheets or smaller, so you'll have to butt two together and make a cut to meet the 13' 6 1/4" length. The profiled roof sheeting I'm guessing are steel roof panels, and those are generally sold by gauge, like 29 or 26 gauge steel, not in inch fractions.
 
Mike Jay
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Sorry but very few of those are standard sizes.  The only one that is common in the US is the 2" x 2" pine.  It looks to me like it was a design for some other region that was just converted into US measurements (eg. 21/32 yards of sand).  I'm going to go way out on a limb and assume that you don't have a large table saw or other way to rip a 4"x4" timber down to 3"x3".  I'm thinking you will need to adjust the plans to work with 2x2's, 2x4's and 4x4's.  Please note that while they are called that, the actual sizes are approximately 1.5" x 1.5", 1.5"x3.5" and 3.5" x 3.5".

I'm guessing you don't get much snow in Houston so there is a decent chance you can substitute 2x4's for the 3x3's.  Unless hurricanes require other construction details...  Keep in mind 2x4's in a roof are much stronger if set up the tall way vs the wide way.

I don't know US brick sizes but I'm guessing those aren't standard either.  I believe our bricks are a bit under 8" long but I'm not sure.

As I look at the dimensions, this looks like a curious design.  Is it a 15' long by 6' wide building with the roof ridge running the narrow direction?  Is there a picture of the assembled coop that you could attach?
 
Barn Gulian
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As a result of the search on the network, I found a manufacturer's website where I found necessary beam sizes. So it's all the same standard sizes if they are on sale?
Another thing: I found  Commercial softwood lumber dimension chart - nominal and actual sizes, where the dimensions from my material list are present.
So, where is the truth?
 
Mike Jay
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As usual the truth is in the middle somewhere.  You will probably never find a 3x3 pine timber at Home Depot.  You probably won't find it at a local lumber company either.  But if you search hard enough or custom order from a sawmill you can probably find a 3x3 timber somewhere out there.  And per the internet the actual size would be 2.5" by 2.5".  So if you want to spend a bunch of time and probably extra money finding wood that matches the material list, go for it.  If you want to get it built with commonly available materials from a big box store, you'll probably have to get creative and substitute. 

By the way, that first website is listing "rough sawn" lumber.  That means it is straight off of the saw and has more texture.  It also means that it will likely be 3" by 3".  After a sawmill makes "rough" lumber, it is then planed down to be smoother and straighter and that's why it ends up smaller (2.5" by 2.5"). 
 
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