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Permaculture for Regional Planning?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 5
Location: Boulder, CO
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Hi gang,

I'm wondering if anyone can share resources or examples of official Regional or Community Planning that has a strong emphasis on permaculture/ecological/resiliency design?

How does the "planning" profession engage with ecological design?  

Thanks for any tips
 
Posts: 25
Location: South of the the headwaters to the tributary at the final bend of the Monongahela River
bike forest garden trees
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I'm looking for the same information. What city are you thinking of and what are some obvious regional issues that this idea could be intended to fix.
There is the National Green Infrastructure certification program in the US, that recently went national, so you could get an official certification for building "green infrastructure" which includes a lot of permaculture concepts for watershed and storm runoff management. Www.NGICP.org I believe.
I'm in Pittsburgh and the local bureaucrats are dragging their feet on setting the training program up here, otherwise I would have it.
Government agencies that manage infrastructure and environmental problems would be good to talk to. Roads, pollution sources, flooding problems, water lines and sewage infrastructure will all greatly benefit from regional permaculture projects with properly planned watershed management.
 
Donald Johnson
Posts: 25
Location: South of the the headwaters to the tributary at the final bend of the Monongahela River
bike forest garden trees
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Examples...
In Pittsburgh the PWSA is attempting to start a training program to build green infrastructure like swales, constructed wetlands, and water sinks/dry wells to manage the flooding in our valleys from storms.
As far as public works, it's a step in the right direction, but the scope and limited intentions behind the projects isn't enough to qualify as actual permaculture in my opinion...
 
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