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Advice on clearance for tempwood stove

 
Posts: 48
Location: Gate City Virginia
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just bought my first tempwood, i close on this little house on dec 28th. it has a big four feet thick double sided chimney with nice hearth, how close can i possibly sit this little tempwood stove to the brick? i am hoping i can sit it n the center of the little hearth or next to the edge, as close to the brick as i can get it.. any advice ?? sure would appreicate it..
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backside
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dining room
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upstairs
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door to attic
 
steward
Posts: 5050
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Hi Michael, welcome to Permies!  Is there a label on the back of the stove that lists the clearances?  On newer stoves they give distances to combustibles.  My guess (that's just a guess) is that the brickwork is solid so there aren't any combustibles beneath a veneer of brick.  I think the manufacturer tests stoves to give the minimum clearances.  If they don't (ie it's a really old stove), building codes usually say it has to be really far from combustibles just to be safe.  If none of that helps you out, you may be able to get an answer from a stove installer in your area.  If you're putting an old chimney back into service it may be worth having them out anyway to inspect the chimney for safety.  

My homeowner's insurance required me to have a wood stove "professionally" installed so you may want to check on that as well.

Good luck!
 
michael reace
Posts: 48
Location: Gate City Virginia
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thanks..  such a quick reply i love this forum..  the chimney is about 4 feet thick..  not a brick veneer.. its solid.   i have a chimney sweep guy coming to check things out on the 22nd of the month..    dunno if he will help me install the little stove.. but will definitely ask..  i know there is some sheetrock above the brick but its high up..   hoping i can set this stove about 18inches from the brick or so..    will be posting about it when i get it all hooked up and going..  and how it works..
 
Mike Jay Haasl
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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We love it too!  :)   I'm not sure if sweeps are certified/licensed everywhere the same, but hopefully he will know the appropriate clearance.  I'm guessing 18" would be fine.  Enjoy!
 
Posts: 354
Location: SW PA USA zone 6a altitude 1188ft
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I had a wood stove for twenty years and tried to keep it burning constantly in winter. It sat about a foot from the brick chimney. I wouldn't worry so much about the brick as the paint on the brick. My chimney was also painted. What I worried most about was the wooden floor below the stove. I set mine on a layer of oversize brick. Not pavers, the ones with the hollow holes. They were on edge. The problem I had was dust and dirt between the brick. There was no mortar so they got dirty. I'd slide some out and leave the ones the stove sat on and sweep up the dirt. I'd suggest a piece or marble or granite on top of the brick. My cat liked to lay under the stove. I guess when it was not burning wide open or when the ash needed cleaned out.

I only burned hardwood. No pine. Watch the chimney. I checked it with a mirror looking up from the clean out, in daylight. I found the one the gas furnace was hooked to was full of mortar debris, which must of fallen from the chimney liner mortar. The sand had filled up and I couldn't believe there was a way for the fumes to clear. On my current house the furnace flue was paper thin. I think everyone needs to check their flues and their chimneys occasionally. Two houses, two huge problems. Lucky I'm alive.

Anyway watch the creosote, burn smart, but enjoy the stove.
 
michael reace
Posts: 48
Location: Gate City Virginia
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i've had it with the chimney sweeps, and masons.. both sell wood stoves and liners..  given me costs in excess of 3500.000 to line my chimney with stainless  over 800 dollars to put stucco on the outside of my existing top of the chimney that sticks out of the roof very expensive... to use this little stove.. i truly want to use the little stove but i am only wanting to do so if my chimney is safe and am not really very confident in the people who have inspected it..as they did not seem to spend very much time inspecting and went into the sales pitch for a liner...    i want to be safe but there has got to be a cheaper way to vent this little wood stove outside so i can get some use out of it.. anyone have any experience with putting a pipe thru a window???    i am desperate to use some cheap wood heat in my little house but want to do it safely..    (sigh).  from the 5th photo down you can see the side of the house near the back.. there are two windows near the lattice work on the  porch. i would like to vent a stove pipe thru one of these windows.. its the lowest point of my roof... how high would i have to put a pipe for clearance of the roofiline ?   its a long way from the two story peak of the roof..  would i have to run a super long pipe to clear the two story part.. or can i get by with running it shorter since its so far away from the two story roofline..  ??  any advice would be so appreciated...
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michael reace
Posts: 48
Location: Gate City Virginia
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here you can see the two windows i just finished tearing out the floor in this part of the house plan on reflooring and insulating this section my little tempwood is small and would have plenty of clearence front back and sides  in this little area be right near the back door of the home .. i would of course add a proper stove matt and board on the back wall ... before venting out a window..  
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Mike Jay Haasl
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I'm not sure how to do a window exit for a chimney.  I do know that the chimney height is usually a set amount higher than any part of the roof that is within 10'.  So that would work out decently for your shallow sloping roof.

That price does seem high.  My installer just put a SS cap over my existing cement cap.  I can't remember what the liner and cap was but I think it was under $1500. But my memory could be failing too...
 
michael reace
Posts: 48
Location: Gate City Virginia
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thanks mike... I truly thought this was priced way too high, i am sort of running out of options for chimney sweeps, i may have to call some other masons and see if they do liner installs..  i figure these guys know there arnt too many people that install these things and they can charge whatever they want to..  i think my ceiling downstairs is less than 7 foot  6 inches tall and the thimble is about 4eet off the hearth.. so its not a long way to the second floor where its about 7 foot tall .. not much liner pipe to run. i though the price was way over the top.. i paid 800 bucks to have block stuccoed all the way around a house once out in the country..  tons of stucco to do the job.. i may see if i can find this guys number that did the work for me..  i am glad to hear the 10 foot clearance away from the other roofline that would allow me to install a much shorter pipe coming out the side of the house there and give me plenty of clearance for it.. going to check at a wood stove place tomorrow and talk to them about pipe to install it.... i can always do away with the two windows in that end of the room and build out a place for the pipe to go thru the side of the house.. i would build a little chimney there but i have to wait till i get some dozing done as you can see the bank is too close to the house to begin with and i have to keep space to allow the water to flow around it...   thanks so much again..  will post some updates as i get futhur along..   check out my wonky joists post for what we discovered when we tore up the flooring in this section of the house.. oh the fun never ends.. LOl..
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Mike Jay Haasl
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Posts: 5050
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Once they dry out you can burn the joists in your stove

The rules may vary in your area regarding how high the chimney needs to go.  By me I "think" it's 2' higher than any piece of roof that's within 10' of the chimney.

Sorry about your struggles, old houses can be fun...
 
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Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
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