Win a copy of Straw Bale Building Details this week in the Straw Bale House forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
stewards:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Mike Barkley
  • Shawn Klassen-Koop
  • Pearl Sutton

Mushroom bench  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 245
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
66
fish food preservation forest garden fungi homestead cooking solar trees wood heat woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A few years ago i did an attempt at growing mushrooms with myceliumplugs. I cut a log, drilled holes ,banged plugs in, dug a hole , put the log in and waited two years, nothing happened. Two days ago, I went out cutting trees in the wood and this tree had fallen on the path, the tractor couldn't pass, i cut the logs and noticed the mushrooms. I took them back home.
I figured that these are well infected by mycelium and the mushrooms look like young oyster-mushrooms to me.
I've dug two holes at the pond, where the overflow is, 2 feet, half a meter and added two pvc pipes to water them if they need it in summer.
Once they have fruited i'm going to cut them level and attach an oak plank on top so the thing can function as a bench at the pond, for two years at least, i hope. I am going to get more of the tree that was in the pathway and put it under the bench on the ground, i hope the mycelium will enter this wood as well. See if that works.
I was being enthousiastic, maybe they're not even edibles, anybody fancy a remark about this mini project?
Thanks.
photo1.JPG
[Thumbnail for photo1.JPG]
Oysters??
photo2.JPG
[Thumbnail for photo2.JPG]
Logs
photo3.JPG
[Thumbnail for photo3.JPG]
Hole
photo5.JPG
[Thumbnail for photo5.JPG]
Tree trunks
 
pollinator
Posts: 909
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
38
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It looks like a good project to me. After fruiting, the logs may not be solid enough to hold a bench.

I can’t tell for sure if they are oysters, but I’m not an expert. Haven’t seen them that color before, but I know they vary a lot. Knowing the location helps with ID.
 
Posts: 137
Location: Maritimes , Eastern Canada
9
fish food preservation forest garden homestead kids pig trees wood heat woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So these are not the logs you innoculated I take it?  Better be very sure of identification. I would take one to someone who knows them. Not worth eating any without 100% sure ID.

I have innoculated ash logs with shitakes , they worked out well , although in future I would try a denser less dry wood. The slugs love them as you  can see by the photo. Also a sign that they are edible. In other words, wild shrooms that have been nibbled on are in most cases edible. If they are pristine looking and purple or brightly colored they CAN be poisonous.
SANY1883.JPG
[Thumbnail for SANY1883.JPG]
shitakes on ash logs
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 909
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
38
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The color looks like a bolete species. Do they have gills or pores?
 
Mark Deichmann
Posts: 137
Location: Maritimes , Eastern Canada
9
fish food preservation forest garden homestead kids pig trees wood heat woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those are NOT boletus. They clearly have deep gills , not the typical smooth underside with pinholes that are hard to mistake in all the Boletus edible and not. They are also on a log which is not the habitat of Boletus which is typically found on forest floor/leaf litter/grass.

There are many species that grow on trees/logs , and they are not generally well known to the average person so I would consult an expert. And definitely Not eat them!
 
pollinator
Posts: 204
Location: Sask, Canada - Zone 3b
50
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Hugo Morvan wrote: anybody fancy a remark about this mini project?  


Looks good, though I doubt your bench will gone in 2 years. It took 6 years for some 1.5 foot high stump-seats I had in my yard to degrade, and that was after they were thrown into a tall grass in a shaded area.

Mark Deichmann wrote: The slugs love them as you  can see by the photo. Also a sign that they are edible. In other words, wild shrooms that have been nibbled on are in most cases edible. If they are pristine looking and purple or brightly colored they CAN be poisonous.


I wouldn't agree with that observation, considering slugs can eat even the most poisonous of mushrooms. When looking at a snail's attributes, it makes sense from an evolutionary perspective that they have developed immunity to most mushroom toxins, as mushrooms seem to be the ideal slug-food. The same can not be said for humans and mushrooms.

In addition to the brightly coloured poisonous ones, are those that resemble white button mushrooms in earlier stages of development, such as the death-cap(Amanita phalloides) in the slug reference above. Mushrooms in the genus Amanita are responsible for the most fatalities among mushroom foragers.

---

As for the mushrooms in the OP, they look to be grey oysters for a few reasons, but I still wouldn't eat them. I have a general rule to not eat any wild mushrooms and since the mushrooms in the OP would amount to $5 worth of oysters, I wouldn't bother chancing it.

Just so no one is scared off mushroom foraging by this point: an easy to identify edible one that is fairly common to find is fairy ring mushrooms.
 
Posts: 13
Location: Reno, NV
fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What you got on your logs looks like oyter to me. Good job!
 
gardener
Posts: 5731
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
818
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
First off you should not have buried the log(s) you inoculated, that prevented the mycelium from being able to grow rapidly, and it gave opportunity for other mycelium to invade,  you might get something from those in another few years.

Those appear to be gray oysters but a spore print would be more definitive or you could take a few to a local expert mycologist if you have one.

The best rule of thumb about mushrooms is "if you don't know for certain, don't eat it", all you get is one mistake, it will be your last mistake most likely.
 
Hugo Morvan
pollinator
Posts: 245
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
66
fish food preservation forest garden fungi homestead cooking solar trees wood heat woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, some sort of succes! While i was away for 3 weeks, the oysters flushed, and dried up!
Weather is mad hot in Europe, 16 degrees today, should be like that in april, it's 24 februari.
Bummer i can't eat them, but they'll be back in autumn.
I do watch out which mushrooms i eat, since once i was about to cook and eat some that where hard to identify when my girlfriend one last time went through the book and identified them as seriously bad ones. But there are no dangerous doppelgangers to oyster mushrooms in europe, as far as i know.
IMG_1048.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_1048.jpg]
 
today's feeble attempt to support the empire
Native Bee Guide by Crown Bees
https://permies.com/wiki/105944/Native-Bee-Guide-Crown-Bees
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!