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Cedar Trees?

 
Posts: 154
Location: NE ARIZONA, Zone 5B, 7K feet, 24" rain
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Maybe my eyesight is changing... or I'm just not seeing it.
I'm never seeing how Cedar Trees proliferate.  Do they have seeds?  Do they spread naturally like love, or hate?  Can I cut sprigs, and root them?
 
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My cedar trees are Ash Juniper; they produce seeds on both male and female trees.  The females have blue juniper berries and the males have tiny little "cones".  Both are a seed as I have had trees come up from both.

I don't think a cutting will root but I have not tried it.  I have just too many baby trees to consider that.
 
Dean Howard
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Anne Miller wrote:My cedar trees are Ash Juniper].

I'm confused.  My Juniper trees (Alligator, Shagbark) are not the same as my nearby Cedar Trees (Blue, Red).  I look for seeds and cones, and have never seen any.  Juniper seeds are pea sized and bigger, but I haven't seen any cones or berries on the Cedars.  Maybe it's because they are tiny and have fallen?

 
pollinator
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Dean Howard wrote:Maybe my eyesight is changing... or I'm just not seeing it.
I'm never seeing how Cedar Trees proliferate.  Do they have seeds?  Do they spread naturally like love, or hate?  Can I cut sprigs, and root them?



If by cedar you are, in fact, referring to red cedar (which is actually Juniperus vulgaris) then the best way to propagate them is to allow birds to eat the "berries" (as Anne Miller mentioned, those are actually the seeds) and then dig up the resulting seedlings you will have EVERYWHERE in a matter of months. Try just sticking them straight in the dirt. (Although, like a lot of things that birds eat, they tend to germinate best after being processed through a bird's gut, red cedar being such a prolific spreader and opportunistic invader of any space it can find to grow in, you probably don't need to help it out much.)

If you want a few seedlings without waiting for the seeds to get that far, why not just come dig up some of the many millions of them we are constantly having to cut down? They're great food and shelter trees for wildlife, but sometimes it is nice to have a few other plants around. Cedars are super invasive and they produce a chemical in their "leaves" that suppresses the growth of other plants within their drip-line. (You may want to keep that in mind when you plant them or try to plant anything under them.) Seriously, if there is someone in your area with cedars, they will probably beg you to come dig some of the seedling trees out of the ground.

Also, I could be wrong but I doubt cuttings would work because red cedar is one of those species that will not grow back when cut down. Trees like elms, oaks, etc will send up new shoots from a stump, but once you cut a cedar, it's dead. That may have nothing to do with anything, but it strikes me that if something won't come up from a stump--with roots still in the ground--it probably won't root from a cutting. I've also never seen a branch from a cedar root where it touched the ground as some shrubs and trees will do. Just a thought ...
 
Anne Miller
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Juniperus deppeana Steud.
Alligator juniper, Checkerbark juniper, Western juniper, Oakbark cedar, Thickbark cedar, Mountain cedar, Tascate, Tacate, Tlascal

Alligator juniper forms a broadly-pyramidal or round-topped crown. The distinctive bark is furrowed into checkered plates. Fragrant, dark blue-green, scale-like foliage and copper-colored fruit are other landscape characteristics.

Propagation
Propagation Material: Seeds
Description: Seed can be sown outdoors in fall or stratified and sown in spring. Seed germination is often poor, so a large quantity of seeds should be sown.
Seed Collection: Collect seeds from late summer through fall when it has turned its ripe color. Thoroughly dry and clean seeds to avoid mold and overheating. If not planting immediately, air dry before storing. Store in sealed containers at 20-40 degrees.
Seed Treatment: Stratify at 41 degrees for 30-120 days.

https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=JUDE2
 
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Dean Howard wrote:Maybe my eyesight is changing... or I'm just not seeing it.
I'm never seeing how Cedar Trees proliferate.  Do they have seeds?  Do they spread naturally like love, or hate?  Can I cut sprigs, and root them?



If you are talking about true Cedar trees, they have cones with seeds (like pine trees).

If you mean  Junipers then they have to first be female trees to seed, Junipers will have either miniscule cones or they will have "juniper berries" but only the female trees will have these.

Redhawk
 
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we have white cedar up here and it has tiny cones that carry a few seeds in them. slow growing compared to red cedar but makes nice hedges you don't need to shear often. wood id just as aromatic as the red.
 
pollinator
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This post points up the importance of determining accurate identification, involving Latin names, and perhaps the posting of photos to gather opinions.  Many species are called "cedar" both within North America and worldwide....Juniperus, Cedrus, Chamaecyparis, Thuja may be being referred to in these posts.  In Australia, "white cedar" is in fact Melia azederach, commonly called chinaberry in the American South!  You can imagine what kind of trouble this can lead to when referring to edibles and medicinals!
 
Anne Miller
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What I found interesting while researching yesterday is that the different species of these type of trees all have their own characteristics. Some of the red cedars don't produce seeds until they are ten years old.

I like cedar trees but can only give information on the ones on my property that I can observe their growth patterns.

The link 'wildflower.org' that I gave for the Alligator Juniper has information on other types of "Cedars" if one wants to do the research.
 
steve bossie
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Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
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Alder Burns wrote:This post points up the importance of determining accurate identification, involving Latin names, and perhaps the posting of photos to gather opinions.  Many species are called "cedar" both within North America and worldwide....Juniperus, Cedrus, Chamaecyparis, Thuja may be being referred to in these posts.  In Australia, "white cedar" is in fact Melia azederach, commonly called chinaberry in the American South!  You can imagine what kind of trouble this can lead to when referring to edibles and medicinals!

the eastern white cedar I'm talking about is Thuja occidentalis.
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