Win a copy of The Tourist Trail this week in the Writing forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Greg Martin

I'll plant and grow a food forest, garden, solar energy, stove building,... trade for RV space.

 
Posts: 109
Location: Nomadic
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
HI Folks. I'm a dyed in the wool permaculture guy. Green thumbed for over 25 years and still love it. Currently everything I own has wheels under it to find a good place to grow again. My solar power plant on a custom motorhome is stored waiting for a new home and garden space. The solar energy system is being wasted. And I'm paying to store it. So I figured I might as well ask to see if a trade for parking and seasonal living/growing space is possible.
I have a cabin in N. Idaho I can rent for $300. It's pretty nice and in the woods. The issue with it is I'll need to pay the rent while I go volunteer doing permaculture in the Winter. It's not in my budget. I'm a sun lover. I follow the sun and the birds South. I use my smaller camper and solar cargo trailer for travel.
I have tools and skills to to build a lot of different things. Designing stoves, energy systems, and construction are other skills I've gotten good at. I did two PDC courses. Temperate and tropical permaculture. The motorhomestead and trailers are in W. Washington. I was going to drive it to Idaho but decided to place this listing first. I was calling it the "mobile permaculture homestead project" for lack of a better name. The motorhome has been redesigned to be more efficient. Added insulation, better heater, big solar energy system, efficient AC. A composting toilet and other improvements are in the works.
I enjoy food forests very much. I've planted and tended some. And diverse hedgerows. But love to grow most anything. I'd like to keep a small permaculture and native plant nursery going. And perhaps do plant tours and native plant and seed collecting.
I had one offer in N. Cal that I like in many ways but a 4x4 is required to enter and exit the property. Well maybe not to exit as its downhill lol. I offered to redesign the steep driveway but it's not in the budget for the foreseeable future. The goal is to have a animal rehab center on that property. Currently some bears and cougars are euthanized in Cal because there's no where for them to go. This is a whole other subject for another thread.
I had another offer of a place in Oklahoma that is nice also. However the land is rented and the owner has little interest in permaculture. It's too much work to risk on such a uncertain foundation. I'm a sincere and dedicated grower looking for sincere place to make abundant and beautiful. Ever since at age 8 I took my Moms potato peelings and tried to plant them in her rose garden. Spring may be sprouting soon. Give me a holler. A community of folks is attractive too. At present I'm in Arizona planning the trip North. I can stop in for a visit on the way??
Any comments or suggestions are welcome. Thanks
 
gardener
Posts: 774
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
170
dog duck chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts pig bike bee solar ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wish we werd on your route but since the Atlantic is between us..... all the very best gor your trip. I'm sure there will be many welcomes along the way!
Mandy
 
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Jeremy,

I have 80 acres in the very southwest corner of Colorado. Raising grass fed animal proteins and gardening. Have a number of construction projects including a greenhouse, stone sauna, and finishing a pole barn. Lots of work to do in the garden space propagating trees and laying out a food forest setup. Have a life times experience with animals to teach! It's currently just my partner and I working on the projects but we have a community of other farmers and families around who come for get togethers and we're close to telluride and durango where there's lots of good culture growing. Let me know if you're still looking, would love to have you for however long you'd like to stay.
Andrew

amriedel87@gmail.com
 
Jeremy Baker
Posts: 109
Location: Nomadic
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you Mandy across the Atlantic. Im a British expat happy to make friends in Europe again. I'm still looking for a place to plant permaculture plantings and tinker on cool projects  I recently found a penpal in England.

Hello Andrew. Thanks for contacting me and I'm definitely interested in a visit. Your project and that area sound great.  I'll send you a email. Jeremy
 
Posts: 29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
PM sent.
 
Jeremy Baker
Posts: 109
Location: Nomadic
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for contacting me Gary. My quest to bring beauty down to Earth continues. I'm definitely learning a lot about what other permaculture people are doing from this great forum. And learning from my current situation with a modified solar motorhome and a converted Van. Winters are the biggest challenge. Practicing permaculture in the South would have definite advantages.
Hooray, it looks like I'm headed to Colorado next via central Arizona. I've gotten two fantastic contacts in Western Colorado now which are on my way back to Idaho. I'm excited to see some of Colorado as I've heard so much about it. And see some of the Canyonlands of Utah. In Colorado I'm going to help survey potential for a micro hydro energy system among other things.
My Winter in Arizona was mostly a flop as far as permaculture is concerned. I found zero permaculture contacts on the West side of the state. I was majorly distracted by the logistics of obtaining dental work in Los Algodones, Mexico. Now that is done I can get back on track. I read about the SE Arizona "Sky islands". This area sounds amazing. I wish I had time and funds to go there now. There is arable land near diverse mountains near Mexico. Sounds great to me!
I was not idle all Winter. I built 2 Solar energy systems. One in West Palm Beach to charge electric Porsche conversions. Another in Arizona to light and power a business with solar. And I improved my solar energy, built a custom heater, modified my expedition rack on the Van, and refined my solar cooking and diet.
 I also planned to go to N. Cal to help with some beautiful land on a mountain but unfortunately it's on hold. A 4x4 is needed to access the property and I don't have one. " Oh Lord Won't You Buy Me A Mercedes Benz 4x4 Sprinter Van". It's a worthy project to also develop a animal rehab center. The Klamath/Siskyou area is amazing.
Ive learned that at 6'5" tall  my regular height van is not comfortable for long term use. I bang my head if I start having any fun. So if I plan to continue doing roving permaculture a high top vehicle, like a Sprinter van, is required (I left my big motorhome in storage until I find a new semi permanent place for it).
  So, in a nutshell, I'm headed back to Northern Idaho to regroup via Colorado.
 It's hard to find a good base to do roving permaculture from. The timing and logistics are difficult. I'll work on my permaculture charismatic megafauna skills.
Funding is a whole other challenge. There's obviously lots of funds in the world for exploitative and extractive activities. Funds for creative and regenerative activities are a whole different challenge. Luckily I don't require a lot. But the initial vehicle infrastructure is spendy even when I do most of the DIY improvements myself. Currently I have a too big and a too small vehicle. It's sounds like the story of the Three Bears. I'm hoping with a Sprinter Van I'll get it " just right". And better fuel mileage.
That's my update for now. Happy Spring

 
Posts: 119
Location: Zone 4b Ontario, Canada
25
goat medical herbs wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Jeremy.
Finally got the chance to view your post, and will be checking this site more often in anticipation of your reply.  I think we could accommodate the season for you, as it sounds like you don't like the snow much.  We are 2 resident PDCs, and 1 Affiliate PDC.  We have many projects on the go, all dependent on workforce and weather.   We are seasonally food self-sufficient, and working to be so for stock feed.  We have taped the maple trees on the property, and are currently collecting sap to make a first time brew of maple beer.  In the fall it will be cider.

Projects on the books for this season:  

Continued work on the outdoor kitchen building the walls with natural materials and more cooking surfaces.  
Trenched hugel beds in the 1/4 acres kitchen garden, and field hugel beds.  
Honey bees, 4 to 6 hives,at the end of the kitchen garden.  
Passive solar dehydrator, and passive solar hot water.  
The commencement of a pole greenhouse.
Creek bed weirs to continue.
Beaver pond harvesting.
Fish ponds to begin stocking.
First solar panel to be installed, with hopes of more to follow.
Continued work in moving off-grid.
Orchard swales and berms to tend.
As well as a small herd of free range dairy goats, free range poultry on the property, and 3 equine.
There are several Farmers Markets nearby, for those interested.

The list may seem lengthy, but "many hands make light work".  The usual ratio is we'll get 2/3 of the way through the list by the end of the growing season.  Hurrah!!

Cheers!
 
Posts: 9
Location: southern IL
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Feel free to message me if ever traveling to/through southern IL
 
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Jeremy... I have 80 acres at 900ft elevation in Northern California. There are apple/fruit orchards and fields that have been cultivated for decades. The property has been neglected for a while, but there is unimaginable potential. There are 2 wells and a year-round, spring-fed creek, complete with swimming holes. Gravel, county maintained road... Easy to get to, yet beautifully remote. Rolling hills and lots of beauty. Would love to meet. Just signed up on this site, so please get in touch. 323.243.6100
 
Jeremy Baker
Posts: 109
Location: Nomadic
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's great to see some responses. Thanks Christopher. I'll call you. I'm almost back to a place to regroup in N. Idaho. The places I visited in N. Arizona, W. Colorado were very worthwhile, educational, and inspirational. I definitely recommend visiting other permaculture sites and folks. Perspective is priceless.  
 I'm excited to build a cordwood addition, heated cob floor, and rocket mass heater/water heater in Idaho this Spring/Summer, 2018. Hope to learn how to document better. Will update soon.
 
gardener
Posts: 1910
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
130
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
PM sent.  Western Colorado  8000 feet private land on national forest inholding.  I think a motor home could go up the road,thepropane truck does.  
 
Posts: 19
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have properties in California. If you want to work and roam the So Cal deserts!
 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Any chance you would be interested in coming to a 112 acre farm in central Kentucky? We have a herd of Dexter cattle.  We are experimenting with a food forest for the last couple of years.  We have fruit trees.  Are practicing some permaculture.  We have a pretty large garden.  We save seeds.  We enjoy harvesting and eating a number of wild foods including a few varieties of wild mushrooms.  We have built and are finishing and continuing to build tiny homes on the farm.  We do bees.  Have a number of ponds on the farm.  One with nice sized fish.  It is a beautiful farm with lots of potential for all kinds of things.

Let me know if you have any interest at all.

Adam
801-618-4935
 
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Jeremy - Since your last post was 5 months ago, I'm guessing you've settled in somewhere for now.  If you're still hoping to head somewhere warm, I may be able to offer a place to park your RV soon.  I'm hoping to buy a small piece of land near Fort Myers, Florida.  I'll be living in a van-sized camper myself while building a ferro cement tiny house.  
 
Jeremy Baker
Posts: 109
Location: Nomadic
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Folks, it’s April, sorry I was absent from this thread for 5 months of Winterlude and regrouping. Hope y’all fared well overwinter and yay it’s Spring!!! No, I have not settled on a place to do Permaculture, community, solar, and steward land yet. My travels got cut short and I needed to move my base to a friends property. That was a process in Winter!!. I’ve been in Washington where I store my old Motorhome. Have been upgrading the Motorhome solar and helping with a couple electric vehicle conversion projects. And doing a lot of reading and thinking. The plan is to fix a better short bus/cargo trailer I found to go visit sites and be semi nomadic. So this season is planned to install a lot of the van and bus conversion materials I’ve collected then sell and donate what’s left. I wish I was building a van or bus together with others. That would be fun. I’ve been catching up on rocket heaters technology wondering if anything could go in a short bus. There is and rocket stoves have come a long way since I was into them 20 years ago. The walker batch stove  and double shoebox 2 stove with glass cook top look very promising.  
But it’s not all work, this Spring I’ve a couple trips planned over the North Cascades to the Methow Valley to continue my nature studies and then down through Eastern Washington, Eastern Oregon, to N. Cal to visit a couple of permaculture sites. Then back to WA to work on the bus conversion and continue downsizing materials. If anyone wants a awesome solar energy system I’d love to bring the equipment I have and help install it. Can always use some productive work along the way to keep the “show on the road”. And of course to visit sites and share Permaculture.
Next week in “April showers” the Allis Chalmers model G electric conversion project for River Farm Community goes into full swing as all the parts will have arrived. After that’s done and I sell some extra solar stuff I plan to take much of May to do the trip previously mentioned. Mays a wonderful month especially if one enjoys botany and birding. April showers bring May flowers.
 All for now.
 My dream still is to check out permaculture sites and offer free suggestions, like a free consulting, and get to know folks. Please contact me if you are interested.
 
pollinator
Posts: 673
Location: Southern Oregon
114
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Jeremy,
I'm in southern Oregon. If you would like a place to stop on the way to Northern California, I would love a visit. PM me if interested.

 
Jeremy Baker
Posts: 109
Location: Nomadic
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Stacy,
Ok, thanks,  I’ll PM you. I’ll be stopping at my mining claim in S. Oregon as it’s a lovely campsite with old growth firs. I bought it mainly to keep it out of the hands of miners and to steward it. But it’s fun for a little gold panning, rock hounding, swimming, and r&r.
 
Kate Michaud
Posts: 119
Location: Zone 4b Ontario, Canada
25
goat medical herbs wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Jeremy.

We are still here in Ontario, if you should come this way be sure to drop in.  

Cheers!  K
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
gardener
Posts: 774
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
170
dog duck chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts pig bike bee solar ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you get brave and cross the Pond, visit us in Galicia!
20190411_081025.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190411_081025.jpg]
20190411_081040.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190411_081040.jpg]
20190411_081117.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20190411_081117.jpg]
 
Posts: 1
Location: Southern California/Southern Sierra Nevada
dog trees tiny house
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Jeremy,

We have 5 acres of off-grid land in the Southern Sierra Nevada in California (elevation 6500') that we bought a little over a year ago. We currently live full-time in Southern California and want to learn more about utilizing permaculture practices/methods at our mountain property and spend more time up there whenever possible. We have tons of pinyon pine trees on our property and deeded access to the South Kern River a couple of miles away. The property is bordered on one side by BLM land. You can read more about Kennedy Meadows & the surrounding area here: http://www.kmpoa.com/ and here: https://www.fs.usda.gov/sequoia.  On our property there's a horse corral that I'd like to fence off and turn into a garden, since we don't have horses. We have a well on the property with running water (including a sink, and two spigots near the cabin & the corral), definitely space for an RV, and we have an outhouse and a tiny cabin (with only one insufficient solar panel, LOL)  that we're working on. I have a lot of ideas for the property, which I'd like to bring to fruition. Please let me know if you are interested in discussing this further, or in visiting when you start traveling south. The South Sierra Nevada is beautiful, and we are also very close to the high Sierra alpine meadows that are great for day trips or even overnight stays. There are lots of wildflowers, too! Safe & fun travels as you embark on your journey.

-Maggie
 
Jeremy Baker
Posts: 109
Location: Nomadic
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nice to hear from you again Kate and Amanda. Wow, the pictures in Visalia look fun. Thanks for that up close look across the pond.
And Maggie, your mountain retreat in the High Sierra looks sunny and bright. The Pinyon Jays are fun to see in that Pinyon Pine Forest. Have you checked out the work of The Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute? They pop to mind for high elevation.
Kate, you get the award for doing Permaculture in Canada.  I think all the folks up there should get some recognition for exploring Permaculture in that climate zone. My friend near Guelph says she still has snow?
Jeremy in the verdure Skagit Valley near the Salish Sea (Puget Sound).
 
Posts: 22
Location: AZ
2
chicken composting toilet greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
if you ever get down to the az nm area just north of mexico  please give us a shout
 
Kate Michaud
Posts: 119
Location: Zone 4b Ontario, Canada
25
goat medical herbs wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Jeremy.

Still interested in having you here at some point, all depending on your travels of course.
Trying to do the solar thing, but honestly it's not my forte, so slow going diy.

Cheers!  K
 
Jeremy Baker
Posts: 109
Location: Nomadic
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kate, nice to hear from you again. It’s understandable that it’s slow going when you are placing energy into many things.  Been there,....I’m still more scattered than would be ideal. But am working towards more focus and clarity this year. There was a Canadian blogger who shared a lot about the challenges of solar in Canada.
solarhomestead.com
 
pollinator
Posts: 240
Location: NW Montana, USA
63
goat purity foraging rabbit chicken food preservation pig bee medical herbs solar ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We've got 'remote' acreage in Western Montana (not far out of Missoula but sparsely populated and quite private) and we've been tossing around the idea of bringing folks up here.  Any situation we entertain should be beneficial and fair for EVERYONE involved.  We have no need for financial contribution, we're looking more for a work/contribution trade.  There is a huge amount that could be done up here.  Roads, greenhouses, and structures are already put in.  We are totally off-grid and live here full-time.  We have a comfortable solar setup and use wood, solar, and propane for cooking, heating, and hot water.  We envision transforming the local ecosystem to help it flourish.  We are over 5k elevation and everything is sparse (except the conifers).  We are thinning the over-populated forest of sickly trees (it was logged a couple decades ago and the next crop of trees is struggling a bit), planting fruit trees and edibles, and trying to bring grass/pasture areas in so that the wildlife can move in and flourish.  With nothing but dense conifers and sparse underbrush, there's very little natural food for wildlife aside from seasonal huckleberry and cone harvests.  We just brought bees in a week ago to see how well they do up here.

We are "permie newbies" but we're implementing everything we can think of and read about.  The basic concepts motivate us but we lack the experience of applying those concepts.  And we're SUPER BUSY getting the farm on its feet as well as working to help fund everything; property is paid for but we still have infrastructure and fuel costs of course.  Permaculture is definitely a passion for both of us but two people can only do so much each day!

Anyway.  If you like sun, we get LOTS of it at this elevation.  If you like heat though, only a snow bird would want to be up here.  The roads are clear/passable late April thru November or so, depends on the year though.  No 4WD needed if there's no snow on the road.  The snow is 90% melted right now (only the most sheltered draws still have snow pack) and our days are climbing to 60/70º.  It doesn't really get above 80º in the summer.

We have RVs available for use but also extra room to park and live, dry camp, or whatever.  We have a lot of ground water and clean natural springs.

If you're interested in talking PM me :)

- Jen
 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Howdy Jeremy,

If you are still looking, we have a unique opportunity which is in our ad on permies, which I will copy below in this reply to you.  Unsurpassed opportunities abound here in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana.  If you would like to know more, we would enjoy talking with you.  Here is our ad on permies:

Howdy Ya'll,

Many people have been mystically-spiritually attracted to Montan's Bitterroot Valley (about 50 miles south of Missoula) by some kind of inner prompting.  There are so many desirable features of our area that attracts self-sufficiency oriented type folks.  Though the area leans more to the conservative than the liberal side, the valley is replete with organic farms and a number of thriving farmer's markets.  We do have a few liberal friends and members of our prep group who look past our conservatism because of the unique compatibility of liberals and conservatives alike in caring for the planet via homesteading and self-sufficiency conservation projects.  Personally, if we wore any political moniker other than independent, it would lean toward Libertarian, since Democrats and Republicans seem to be two different sides of the same corporate coin!

There are a multitude of cottage industry type opportunities for self starters here in the valley with or without associating directly with us.  This letter will tell a little more about us in this regard.

My wife, Starr, and I have sponsored a local community service dedicated self-reliance preparedness group, BSOSC, here in the Bitterroot Valley about 5 miles south of Hamilton, Montana, for over 10 years.  We hold monthly meetings with a plethora of homestead skills sets classes.  We have had a blog/forum for over 9 years sharing tons of info to help self-sufficiency oriented folks, which is located at www.bsoscblog.com.  Though quite minuscule compared to permies.com, there are thousands of "How To" and other info postings on the site for which we have had subscribers from all over the world.

Where we differ from typical intentional communities is that we are essentially an independent valley wide group of people with a co-operative style self-reliance preparedness group, each with their own places, yet always sharing information and helping each other.  Some of the members (like us) are capable of offering internships/part-time jobs, etc., with either living or RV facilities available.  

Permaculture is a major area of emphasis in the BSOSC group, probably because a few of us are so gung-ho about it.  We have done a wide array of self-sufficiency projects, along with teaching classes about those developments in shelter, water, food production, alternative medicine, alternative energy, alternative transportation and alternative economy of barter and cottage industries.

Though dabbling around at it for 7 years, only in the last 3 years have I been seriously dedicated to experimenting with different plants and methods in food forest permaculture development.  We have one food forest of a 1/10th acre that is coming along well and a second larger food forest well into development, though not as far along which is primarily focused on nut trees and fruit trees.  We have had for the last 11 years, a huge raised bed, semi-permaculture garden which is about half into perennials such as apple trees, grapes, raspberries and blackberries and others.  I am working toward turning a large portion of it into Hugulkultur beds as we have done in the other two food forests.

We have had 2 attached greenhouses for the last 10 years, one of which is a pyramid (for the energy generation) formerly used for aquaponics that is now temporarily mostly inactive.  Last fall I started our 3rd, our "MAGS" Greenhouse (Modified Annualized Geo Solar)  which is primarily done and in a functional state.  We are excited that this will provide for our cold country (here in Montana, inexpensive to heat) year round organic food  production via the quadruple heating functions of climate battery, solar, geo source and hydronic via wood stove pumping of hot water and hot air through the system.  We started thousands of seeds in it in February.  For the last few months we have been giving plants away to group members and pretty much whoever wants them.

We have completed many other self-reliance homestead projects, with some yet unfinished or in need of more improvement.  The work never really ends on a homestead, but when it is such an enjoyable evolutionary process, the work is more fun than any drudgery.  Being a daily creator of advancing some current project or embarking upon a new one, we never have a boring day!

We have accomplished numerous homestead projects within all 7 of the preparedness task forces of the BSOSC (Bitterroot Survival Outfitting Systems Co-op) which are taught in the lessons of our monthly meetings and are listed in survival hierarchy of importance on our www.bsoscblog.com.  These include mental/spiritual preparedness, shelter types, water source development, alternative energy, alternative (natural) medicine/health, alternative transportation, protection, personal cottage industry type businesses for economic development, gold/silver and barter systems.  These are the primary categories from which we have had hundreds of classes in our meetings over the years.

We have always been open to having people participating on our homestead, but due to some irresponsible, unmotivated people, have grown very cautious in offering an opportunity to live here and work part time for housing and utilities.  Many people talk the talk, but miserably fail to walk the walk.  Three times we have invited people who pompously talked the talk, only to later discover their total lack of accountability/responsibility and lack of industry to simply be the best person they could be.  Maybe we are too gullible in trusting people, that they are telling the truth and will do what they say if we give them the opportunity!

It is obvious that we must check out people more carefully while in turn, gladly offering them opportunity to thoroughly check us out.  With our 22 years of community service/activism here in the valley we are prepared to furnish personal, business, political, activism references someone may want.  We would only request equal reciprocation from anyone requesting the references on us.

Therefore, we request verifiable personal and professional references from anyone before our committing to offer an opportunity again.  At the moment we have somewhat limited living facilities to offer.  We do have an RV spot.  The limitation is that the mobile home we have on the back of our homestead suffered a broken pipe and subsequent water damage over the rough winter, which will require considerable repairs be completed before re-occupation.

Our offer to the right person/family would be:
1) Possibly a mobile home place to live with all utilities furnished if and when we succeed in getting time to complete repairs;
2) All the organic, heirloom fruit and vegetable food they want as long as they do their part to help in raising it;
3) A share in organic free range chicken production (meat, eggs) based upon equal participation in facilities, costs, etc.;
4) Access to use of our variety of shops including: welding/fabrication; woodworking; machine; auto restoration/painting and more;
5) Opportunity to start their own cottage industry business via use of our shops/facilities;
6) Meeting like-minded, community oriented new friends and networking opportunities via our BSOSC homestead prep group meetings;
7) Freedom to pursue their own personal pursuits, business with only a part-time committment on our homestead.

For years we had goats, turkeys, cattle, pigs, etc. which we raised and butchered.  When and if the time is right, these could be easily re-instituted...nothing but work, time and money to get all those endeavors going again!

Starr and I are very, very active in working on our homestead and little cottage industry businesses thereon.  Though I am 72 and she is 69, it seems very few half our age work as hard as we do.  This is why I always tell people we do not expect them to work any harder than we do.  It is fun in seeing that nobody believes our age.

If you are curious to talk about possible opportunities and can furnish references, it would be nice to visit with you.  My cell phone is 406-360-2248.  Our home phone is 406-363-3663 and Starr's cell is 406-546-6639.  My email address is jpf@sosgeneralstore.com.  I rarely get on these forums, so please reply directly as I would not want anyone to ever feel offended because they did not receive a response from us if you receive no reply from this posting.

If neither our possible opportunity offering nor the Bitterroot Valley of Montana location is a potential fit for you, we do wish you the very best in your eco-village/intentional community search!

Happy Empowerment Trails,

Jim

Jim Farley
jpf@sosgeneralstore.com  
 
I yam what I yam and that's all that I yam - the great philosopher Popeye. Tiny ad:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!