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r (attempts to) sew a button down blouse for curvy people

 
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Looking back on this project, I don't like the way quilting cotton feels.  I want to find some cotton fabric for a winter shirt.  Local shopping is difficult and expencive.  But I don't know what words to look for when online shopping.

 
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r ranson wrote:Looking back on this project, I don't like the way quilting cotton feels.  I want to find some cotton fabric for a winter shirt.  Local shopping is difficult and expencive.  But I don't know what words to look for when online shopping.

Brushed might be one word to look for.
Satin might be a word to avoid.
Shiny, slippery cotton seems to be in right now, and personally, I dislike the feel.
I love the feel of flannel, but it's not exactly formal and it's hard to find anything but plaid or pajama!
 
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r ranson wrote:Looking back on this project, I don't like the way quilting cotton feels.  I want to find some cotton fabric for a winter shirt.  Local shopping is difficult and expencive.  But I don't know what words to look for when online shopping.



My question is what do you not like about the quilting cotton? Too many factors possible.  What I like and what you do are possibly different things.

If I were saying it, it would be because it's a bit coarsely woven, I like tighter weave finer cotton like Kona cotton.  I also like solid colored flannels, and will use quilting cotton for skirts, but less likely for shirts.

So a bit more information would help us  :D
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

r ranson wrote:Looking back on this project, I don't like the way quilting cotton feels.  I want to find some cotton fabric for a winter shirt.  Local shopping is difficult and expencive.  But I don't know what words to look for when online shopping.



My question is what do you not like about the quilting cotton?



I'm finding it stiff.  I want clothing that drapes a bit more.
I also find that it doesn't allow as much airflow as I want through the cloth.  

But I don't want the cloth to be so flimsy that it is tansparent.  
 
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r ranson wrote:
I'm finding it stiff.  I want clothing that drapes a bit more.
I also find that it doesn't allow as much airflow as I want through the cloth.  

But I don't want the cloth to be so flimsy that it is tansparent.  



Definitely not Kona cotton then. It drapes nice, but no airflow.
 
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Cotton voile, lawn, seersucker and gauze are all good for summer clothing. For colder weather, try flannel, pinwale corduroy and other brushed cotton. Personally I like crinkle gauze for less structured blouse, it feels like wearing air!

There are educational fabric swatches for sale, I remember at one time it was like $10 for package for 30 cotton swatches, also available in silk or wool.
 
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I am way late to this thread,  but I just have to ask...there is a buttonhole attachment for a machine of that vintage?   Could you upload a picture?

I recently acquired a 1901 Singer 27 that looks much like  yours.   It came with a bunch of attachments,  most of which are a mystery to me.

How did your blouse turn out?  For a softer hand, you might want to try viscose rayon.  I got some that could be washed (cold water).  It survived both the washer and the dryer without incident.  
 
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Ellen Morrow wrote:  For a softer hand, you might want to try viscose rayon.  I got some that could be washed (cold water).  It survived both the washer and the dryer without incident.  

As I dove deeper into "cradle to grave" fabric, the chemicals required to make things like rayon, and even "green-washed" bamboo based fabric, the environmental costs are huge and the difficulty "recycling" at end of life is not something I could do on my property. I looked specifically at bamboo as I have 4 different types growing on my land and with how it was publicized as "green" and "renewable" I wondered if somehow I could use it as a base material such as cotton or flax. Alas - not a chance. The *only* thing renewable about bamboo fabric is the bamboo grove - from there it's totally a large scale, industrial process with nasty end-products.

I just wish we could come up with a more environmentally sound way to grow cotton. Growing it industrially is bad for the environment, but I'm not convinced it couldn't be done in a better way. Anyone know of a perennial  cotton tree that will grow on Vancouver Island?
 
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Alas, in my opinion bamboo IS rayon (fabric made by running wood pulp through a chemical process).  The natural alternative is silk.  R wanted a drapier fabric for her blouse and rayon will do that without costing a fortune.

Linen can be soft after a few washings, but it tends to be expensive.  R, I think, grows and weaves her own linen so she knows its ways.

Wool crepe might work, but again, expensive and not easy care.

Quilting cotton is cheap, easy care, and a bit like wearing typing paper.  If there are softer cottons out there, I'd like to know about them.
 
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