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A tree in my garden...

 
Nathalie Poulin
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Hey guys! (Finally figured out the pictures...ugh...)

I have a tree growing in my backyard and I was told that it's a pear tree, however, it's never born fruit. I was wondering if anyone could confirm that it is, in fact, a pear tree? Perhaps it needs a friend to pollinate it? I've taken a picture of the bark, the blossoms and the whole tree.


The bark:



The blossom:



The full tree:


Here is a picture of my backyard! That's my shepherd/husky, Poe. In the front are 2 raspberry bushes, tons of clover and lettuce. And just behind is my black currant! The second half is a raised bed a la sepp holzer. I put a bunch of compost in between 2 beds and planted pumpkins, peas, borage, tomatoes, leeks, asparagus and peppers. Except for the asparagus, none of them have sprouted. (My dog also dug it up so I had to put it back together as best I could.)
In the pot is an avocado tree that I started growing in January. I did it the ol' fashioned way and let it rot for a few weeks on my counter. I cut it open and it was moudly inside. I buried in the pot and watered it every once in a while. Sometimes I watered it with diluted vinegar because I heard avocado's like acidic soil. After I thought for sure nothing was happening, last week I saw 2 little sprouts! Now I've moved it outside for lots of sunlight!
In order to make the raspberry patch, I needed to move some patio stones. I had my husband and a friend smash them up and I built a herb spiral. I planted mostly everything from seed and I'm starting to see herb sprouts!

 
                                    
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i think what you have there is a callery pear... check it out for yourself  Pyrus calleryana
these trees are planted everywhere in the midwest... they have small round fruit that is bitter until frost and has a lot of grit cells.... very gritty.... it is a good coppice plant and would probably be better in your landscape for that purpose as they are known to have brittle wood and bad crotch angles (lol).... other than that the bees love them... I'm not sure but it may also act to cross fertilize any existing pears that you may have on the property and increase the harvest as well.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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pear trees are NOT self fertile
 
                            
Posts: 126
Location: Ava, Mo, USA, Earth
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I can't tell from the picture, but there are sterile pears that are planted for "ornamental value."  PC-wise, they are useless.  Bradford is the most common.  I'm pretty sure it doesn't even produce nectar or pollen for bees.
 
Jeff Hodgins
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Brenda Groth wrote:
pear trees are NOT self fertile

Ok so maybe you can just graft on a different kind of pear for pollenization, or just plant 1 more tree. You could maybe even get a branch from another tree and shake it around in the existing tree. I don't know enough about pear flowers to know if that would work or not.
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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While most pear trees are not self-fertile, some are.  Since yours have never bore fruit, you must have one of the non self-fertile varieties.  Grafting is one solution, but as mature as your tree looks, I think I would opt for a second tree.

As far as self fertile varieties, my (very incomplete) list shows the following (European) varieties:
Bosc, D'Anjou (red), Fanstill, Flemish Beauty, and Kieffer.
There are also several varieties of self fertile Asian  pears.  When I get my 2 lists a little more complete, I will post them in a separate thread (in "Woodland care".

 
Nathalie Poulin
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Thank you so much for all your replies, I appreciate the help.

Right now I'm deciding if I want to chop that tree down and use it as a hugelkultur bed for a fruit baring tree. The previous owner of this house planted that tree and I feel like he butchered it. He cut it so that it grew really tall and spindly.

I'm thinking of replacing it with a cherry tree. I don't think I could have two trees in my yard because it would block out all the limited sun I get.

I'm in Ottawa, Canada, zone 5a, in case anyone has any suggestions!
 
                                      
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Seckel (European) is another sold/marketed as self fertile. It is supposed to be a very high quality pear....
 
                            
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If it's an ornamental pear you should just graft/topwork it. I'd try something either like an oblique/cleft graft and stuff 3 scions of 3 different varieties on that thing. Or maybe budding in the same manner. Even if it fails and you kill the tree, well then, you've killed a Bradford Pear and made room for something that will play a greater role in your life.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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