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How to stop moss dominating grass?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 56
Location: Leicester, UK 8b,
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Hi, my dad has pasture on sw Scotland. Prob zone 7. He is finding that with the high rainfall and low light levels mosses are beginning to dominate over the grasses and the pasture quality is deteriorating rapidly. Please can anyone suggest any remedies? His soil is  pH 5.3 so we have been wondering how to raise this without the cost of liming. Also very wet - rushes grow on the top of the hill.
ideas been put forward ;
Grow lotus uloginosis (greater birds foot trefoil) to help the nutrient levels.
chain Harrow the field to reduce the moss, sow fescue and bent~acid tolerant, strong growing grasses?
Show chicory to open up the soil?

Has anyone any ideas please?
 
Posts: 832
Location: Graham, Washington [Zone 7b, 47.041 Latitude] 41inches average annual rainfall, cool summer drought
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If you can get some kind of palatable forage to grow, high frequency mob rotational grazing with plenty of litter trample should help smooth out that PH to some extent over time.

If the moss is really bad it might be wise to have pigs tear it up then lay down fast growing annual summer forage/cover crop to plant into around August/maybe September
 
Posts: 20
Location: Alberta, Great White North zone 4
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I recomend the book fertility pastures by newman turner. Its a good book about pastures and its written by a guy with a jersey heard in your part of the world.
 
pollinator
Posts: 375
Location: Southern Arizona. Zone 8b
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Grow blueberries?  

Might be more profitable than pasture, and the soil pH and moisture sound like just the ticket for blueberries or cranberries.
 
cesca beamish
Posts: 56
Location: Leicester, UK 8b,
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Thanks for all the ideas. Pigs is a possibility. I don't think he'd want to start a new project of acres of fruit but I do prefer the method of going with it rather than fighting it.
 
pollinator
Posts: 880
Location: Longbranch, WA
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Chicken tractors or rotational chicken free ranging is a good option. You can find segments on how that worked on the You tube channel Swedish Homestead has success with it.
 
pollinator
Posts: 816
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Simply spraying a diluted mixture of dish soap and water onto the moss will kill it.  But for a pasture, that would be a lot of dish soap.

Iron metal shavings will also kill moss.  If you know someone who turns brake rotors, get a big bunch of metal shavings from them and then scatter them around on the moss.  You could approach anyone who machines metal parts --- but it needs to be shavings from steel or iron -- basically, anything that rusts.  You don't want any shavings from stainless steel or aluminum or any non ferrous metal, or you'll have sparkly silver glitter out there for the rest of your days. 

Fundamentally, anything you do to rid the land of moss will only be temporary unless you change the underlying conditions that are causing the moss to thrive.  More sunlight, better drainage . . . that sort of thing.
 
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