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mahogany, sapele, & red grandis sawdust as substrate?

 
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I just found a decent source of sawdust. However, it is 90%  mahogany, sapele, & red grandis. My goal would be to get edible mushrooms and mushroom compost to use in the garden.
Does anyone know anything about the use of these tree species in growing edible mushrooms?
 
echo minarosa
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So the only thing I can find in the forum archives and elsewhere is that people have experimented with mahogany sawdust.with varying levels of success. I have found nothing in fungal literature suggesting it should not be used for edible mushrooms. I have been offered suggestions of potential mixes largely to get the particle size up and increase interstitial oxygen. I would like to use the mixes in garden beds for Stropharia, and also mix with coffee grounds for oyster mushrooms, though when I say this most folks say beds are unsuitable for oyster mushrooms.

Any thoughts?
 
echo minarosa
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So other than a handful of small mushrooms early last year, the two test beds haven't done much. They are covered in burlap coffee sacks to try to hold in some moisture. Last year we had biblical rains the first half of the growing season, then drought for the last. So it probably isn't the best to base any real decisions on. In March 2019, I dug through the substrate and found the mycelium pretty well worked in throughout. I then added more rougher pieces (traps more air) and covered with fresh poplar shavings. Still nothing mushroom-wise.
 
echo minarosa
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I figured I'd update. The two test beds haven't done much despite there being more than a cubic yard of substrate in each bed. Last year I saw maybe 3-4 mushrooms but this year...nothing. I'm trying to be patient, but they look like they might be better served being converted into rhubarb beds.
 
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I dont know anything about the questions you asked but I appreciate you coming back to share your results.  
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