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Stronghold Haywire Klamper Binding Tool by Morgan Enterprises  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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============================
==========Description=========

This affordable tool has an infinite amount of uses.  The only limit is your own imagination!
At 4 oz, 4 inches and only 3 parts, the thousands of uses for this indispensable item will boggle the mind. The Stronghold Haywire Klamper is a powder coated utility tool that is made in America and is useful for binding nearly any two things together aside from skyscrapers! This light, durable and extremely handy tool is a definite for your toolbox, shop, emergency kit or bug out bag.

Bind nearly any two objects together
Repair and fasten hoses at a fraction of the cost of traditional fasteners
Fix wooden handles such as hammers and axes
Create joints from both metal and wooden posts
Build emergency shelter or tools
The possibilities are endless!

This is truly one tool your toolbox should never be without. The Haywire Klamper utilizes common steel wire which means your binding material is easy to stock up on and can be used on wood, metal, rubber, concrete and just about any other type of material imaginable!

The Stronghold Haywire Klamper is the simplest and easiest way to clamp, bind or repair almost any item by way of hardened steel wires wrapped around any item with an amazingly tight hold.

The tool uses hardened wires that wrap around any item with extreme pressure that will securely hold, clamp or repair nearly any item! The Stronghold Haywire Klamper clamps with much greater pressure than a conventional worm clamp!

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==========Contact Manufacturer====
Wes Morgan

Phone: 406.291.1453
Send a Message

Morgan Manufacturing
PO Box 1556
Thompson Falls, MT 59873

=============================
==========Videos=============
The video that introduced me to the Klamper and it's many uses

===
The Inventor doing his trade show spiel



=============================
==========Places to Purchase======
Homepage of the Klamper
Self Reliance Outfitters
Ecwid
Cottage Craft Works


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==========Online Reviews=========
Pantry Paratus
Survival Blog

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===========Images============
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The Klamper Tool - Simplicity
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Easy Tight Wood Joinery
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SHTF Adaptability
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High Price of Hose Clamps
 
William Wallace
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I give this tool 8 out of 10 acorns

This tool is for every type of repair that you never saw coming.  It's for fixing things that you didn't anticipate to break, or for making things that you didn't know that you would need.  If you are a bushcrafter, you need one of these.  If you are a homesteader, you need one of these.  Yes, they cost about 25 dollars, and that isn't cheap ..... but it can save you hundreds of dollars on repairs.

There are a few reasons that I did not give this tool 10 out of 10.  The first is that there are many different DIY wire clamp tools out there.  To be fair, they have been designed to mimic this tool.  If you are on a tight budget, you might think of trying the DIY version first.  The original bought from the company will be machined to work just right, but you can make a model that works and does generally the same thing.  I personally feel that someone should help support the inventor of this great tool, if they are able to.  For something that can get you out of a jam, I personally would want the heavy duty machined version, and not one that I cobbled together from parts.  I don't want my tool to fix things to break.  Since there's the ability to create your own version, I deducted a single acorn for that.

The other acorn deduction still was not for lack of uses of this tool.  The sheer number of uses far outweigh any that you can think of quickly.  This is one of those "limitless" tools.  Once you start to understand how it works, and what you can use it on ... you start seeing how you can use it almost every single day.  You start wishing that you carried one in your car, or with you to work.  You hear someone tell a story, and you realize that their salvation would've been this small little tool.  This second acorn was deducted because of the lack of marketing and videos from the company.  It's difficult to imagine, but there are only really two videos on Youtube ..... for a tool that has thousands of uses.  I linked the video by Dave Canterbury, and I have to give him credit for being the person to have shown me this tool.  Still, his video only scratches the surface of what this tool can do.  If you are looking to purchase this tool, I suggest that you look at either Dave's site (self reliance outfitters), or the actual homepage website (haywireklamper.com).  I really enjoy supporting Dave, because he is the one who showed me this great tool, and has allowed me to show it to all of you.  That's worth an affiliate referral percentage in my book.

I'm a marketing and sales guy.  I love making videos and showing off gear in videos.  I contacted Wes, and talked with him about promoting his product in youtube videos.  Oddly enough, he told me that he gets like 75 requests for that a day.  I say oddly, because there are only two videos on youtube that discuss the haywire klamper at all.  That's quite an odd marketing scheme.  Now, don't get me wrong..... I'm not deducting an acorn because Wes told me no.  I'm not that trivial.  I think that they have done a very poor job at describing what can be done with this tool, and giving it to people in a form that is pleasing.  The main video on youtube is Wes doing his little sales spiel.  I admit that it's a good show of the tool, and it's uses ..... but you can tell that Wes goes to all kinds of tradeshows, and he is just doing his "bit" that he has done many times before.  Yes, this tool is great, but I would like to see some forward thinking uses.

This is a tool that permaculture enthusiasts could find thousands of uses for.  This is a tool that could basically build a homestead.  This tool can help people reduce the amount of toxic glues and binding agents in their house.  This can help people reduce the costs of unnecessary repairs.  This tool is sustainability.  If you buy the wire that is suggested, the repairs will last in the weather for decades.  The wire shouldn't rust.  These are sustainable repairs.  This could turn a normal bushcraft build into permanent-craft. 

The two biggest features of this tool are not the ability to bind something together, but to bind it tightly and permanently.  The turn knob allows you to get torque on the wire and get that super tight fit.  You wouldn't be able to do that with a leatherman easily.  Once you practice with this tool, and master how to create it's bindings, you can make things safer knowing that they will not slip.  It's not a simple tool.  You have to measure the size of wire needed, and fold the wire the correct way to make the clamp ...... but once you understand that, then this tool becomes a breeze to use. 

I probably should have deducted an acorn for the horrible instructions that come with the tool.  They really are inadequate little photocopies that are hard to read.  Luckily, there's just enough information on the website that you can figure out how to use this tool effectively.  The instructions are just there to remind you how to do things as you pull out the tool to use.  Don't expect the instructions to teach you everything that you need to know, or expect the instructions to be easy to follow.  If you get this tool, expect to watch the two videos about this tool several times.  Practice using this tool for different things, and teach yourself through repetition. 

This tool is a solid 8 acorns out of 10.  If there were better videos showing more uses, if there were more detailed instructions, then this tool would be a solid 9 or 10 out of 10. 



 
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I have one, different brand. Got it after it was recommended here:

http://kk.org/cooltools/clamptite-2/

Maybe I haven't found the right gauge wire yet, but I find it kind of clunky and aggravating. I don't use it nearly as often as I thought I would.
 
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This seems like an amazingly quick way to lash together semi-permanent infrastructure.

I want one now.
 
William Wallace
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Mike Cantrell wrote:I have one, different brand. Got it after it was recommended here:

http://kk.org/cooltools/clamptite-2/

Maybe I haven't found the right gauge wire yet, but I find it kind of clunky and aggravating. I don't use it nearly as often as I thought I would.



Yeah Mike, those two tools work completely different, although they both clamp with wires.  I guess they work pretty similarly, but that clamptite looks more difficult to create, and it doesn't seem to finish as easily.  The Stronghold you simply bend it backwards, trim it off and done, where you have to continue twisting the ends for the clamptite http://clamptool.com/pages/single.html ; I think that any of these clamper tools would make a good addition to a toolbox, or a survival bag. 

Kyrt, it's definitely something to make those semi-permanent builds or repairs.  You've hit the nail on the head there.
 
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Looks like great item. Thanks for posting. You convinced me i needed one, but i opted for the clamptite version. If the haywire had a snubby snipper included i probably would have got it.

If im out in a field to make a repair and i dont have snips, the clamptite seems easier to use. I can bend/ twist the wire to cut it, and still wrap it around the pins to tighten it. If i did that with the haywire, the mutilated end might not fit in the required hole.

Its a small difference. Will see how it goes.
 
William Wallace
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wayne fajkus wrote:Looks like great item. Thanks for posting. You convinced me i needed one, but i opted for the clamptite version. If the haywire had a snubby snipper included i probably would have got it.

If im out in a field to make a repair and i dont have snips, the clamptite seems easier to use. I can bend/ twist the wire to cut it, and still wrap it around the pins to tighten it. If i did that with the haywire, the mutilated end might not fit in the required hole.

Its a small difference. Will see how it goes.



Hey Wayne, I contacted the owner of that clamptite, and wanted to see if he would give me a tool to compare to his competitors.  It's his opinion that there is no competition between his and the others.  Of course, that's his opinion.... but it was based on the fact that he says his does much higher PSI of clamping, where others will hold like 35psi hoses.  This makes me interested to test out the units side by side, and see how the claims of similarities and differences stack up. 
 
wayne fajkus
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Theres no doubt that the clamptite will pull it tighter.  It seems obvious when you look at them side by side. Each turn of the clamptite will pull it by the length of the screw thread height. Each turn of the haywire will be the circumference of the dowel(1:1). Either allow you to snug the wire before turning so the number of turns dont seem excessive with either. The clamptite is basically geared, adding torque.

I dont know that i would call that a selling point though. A broke wire or cutting into a rubber hose you want to clamp are 2 reasons i can think of. I doubt that could happen with the haywire. But as a rep, they need to point out something that differentiates their product.

Clamptite has a bushing (plastic washer) that can wear out. Nothing on the haywire looks as if it will wear out.

 
wayne fajkus
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William Wallace wrote:

Yeah Mike, those two tools work completely different, although they both clamp with wires. 



Look at the other instructions. Everything will make more sense. Its the same thing, but different.

http://clamptool.com/pages/double.html
 
William Wallace
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Okay, I see now.  It was the single wrap that has you pass through the tool.  I can see how the double then can be used without tools.  That is, assuming that you don't have to "release the tool by cutting the wire".  This should be able to be accomplished by unwrapping the wire and bending it.
 
wayne fajkus
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Mine came in. Will be playing with it soon
 
wayne fajkus
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Easy enough to use. It spins  easily. I couldnt see any hand callouses after using it a full day, regardless of who is using it.

I think the wire could be broke by over tightening since it turns so easily

Its easily removed without snipping wires, yet snipping is preferred to get rid if the tag end.

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